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Coffee makers

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  • lynn_glenmontlynn_glenmont Member Posts: 8,696 Member Member Posts: 8,696 Member
    I don't expect any converts, but the reason an electric percolator makes the best coffee is the temperature. A french press starts out around 180F and goes down from there. By the time if is poured it is closer to 160 and that is starting with a boiling kettle.

    Electric percolator superheats the water in the base (steam) and delivers very close to boiling water, over and over again. Hence the full bodied flavor not possible with a French press. If I could tell you how many lab experiments were conducted on this you would laugh out loud. But, trust me. it has been extensively researched.


    By the time I drink it, it's going to be a lot less than 160F, no matter what it started out. You can't taste the coffee if you burn all your tastebuds. :smile:

    Seriously, though, was the research on the temperature of the water in the different methods, or the taste of the coffee in the different methods? The hotter the water when it hits the beans, the more likely you are to extract the bitter flavors, is my understanding. There's a reason why cold brew is so popular.
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 19,847 Member Member, Premium Posts: 19,847 Member
    I don't expect any converts, but the reason an electric percolator makes the best coffee is the temperature. A french press starts out around 180F and goes down from there. By the time if is poured it is closer to 160 and that is starting with a boiling kettle.

    Electric percolator superheats the water in the base (steam) and delivers very close to boiling water, over and over again. Hence the full bodied flavor not possible with a French press. If I could tell you how many lab experiments were conducted on this you would laugh out loud. But, trust me. it has been extensively researched.


    By the time I drink it, it's going to be a lot less than 160F, no matter what it started out. You can't taste the coffee if you burn all your tastebuds. :smile:

    Seriously, though, was the research on the temperature of the water in the different methods, or the taste of the coffee in the different methods? The hotter the water when it hits the beans, the more likely you are to extract the bitter flavors, is my understanding. There's a reason why cold brew is so popular.

    I tend to dislike percolator coffee because it tastes harsh to me, but I figured that was just another example of me being a cranky idiosyncratic philistine, similar to preferring overdone or even browned eggs over runny or "creamy" ones. 🤷‍♀️
  • wilson10102018wilson10102018 Member Posts: 984 Member Member Posts: 984 Member
    I don't expect any converts, but the reason an electric percolator makes the best coffee is the temperature. A french press starts out around 180F and goes down from there. By the time if is poured it is closer to 160 and that is starting with a boiling kettle.

    Electric percolator superheats the water in the base (steam) and delivers very close to boiling water, over and over again. Hence the full bodied flavor not possible with a French press. If I could tell you how many lab experiments were conducted on this you would laugh out loud. But, trust me. it has been extensively researched.


    By the time I drink it, it's going to be a lot less than 160F, no matter what it started out. You can't taste the coffee if you burn all your tastebuds. :smile:

    Seriously, though, was the research on the temperature of the water in the different methods, or the taste of the coffee in the different methods? The hotter the water when it hits the beans, the more likely you are to extract the bitter flavors, is my understanding. There's a reason why cold brew is so popular.

    Cold brew may be popular but it would never stand up in a blind tasting if compared to just about anything made conventionally and then cooled down.

    The aromatic esters that come off the beans early and at lower temperature are quite acidic. Very bitter. The higher temperature extractions are quite full bodied and mild. In an instant coffee spray tower, they blow off the esters into a scrubber and discard the condensate. Some makers use the esters in secret process.

    You could easily see these principles at work by tasting the french press grounds with a second flush of boiling hot water. It will be unappealingly weak. But not bitter.
  • L1zardQueenL1zardQueen Member Posts: 8,645 Member Member Posts: 8,645 Member
    I use a double walled stainless steel French press. I heat the water to 190F and then pour over fresh ground beans. I let steep for 4 minutes. It is perfectly hot and delicious.
  • LisaGetsMovingLisaGetsMoving Member Posts: 606 Member Member Posts: 606 Member
    We love our Bunn with a thermal carafe, I think it's now called a speed brew. It brews a cup or 12 cups in about a minute. Coffee tastes good too, provided you start with good beans. The thermal carafe keeps the coffee hot for about two hours. We've only had 2 coffee makers in the last 28 years, both Bunn, so they last a long time. They're expensive but worth it.

    We had a Keurig for our RV and it was OK for that. I don't like all the pod trash, prefer fresh ground beans and even if you use the refillable pods, it's just a constant state of mess and clean up to make several cups of coffee. We eventually switched the Keurig in the RV out for a french press and put the Keurig in the shop for visitors.
    edited January 25
  • MsCzarMsCzar Member Posts: 375 Member Member Posts: 375 Member
    Am I the last person on earth to use a stove-top percolator? I own a Krups espresso machine and a good French press. I like them both, but I still prefer my ancient percolator.

  • MikePfirrmanMikePfirrman Member Posts: 2,494 Member Member Posts: 2,494 Member
    You all are making me want an electric percolator. When my Mr Coffee dies (and it will, they last like 3 years, like clockwork), I'll look into getting one. Haven't used one of those since my camping days in college.
    edited January 25
  • L1zardQueenL1zardQueen Member Posts: 8,645 Member Member Posts: 8,645 Member
    I know. I want a percolator now.
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 19,847 Member Member, Premium Posts: 19,847 Member
    MsCzar wrote: »
    Am I the last person on earth to use a stove-top percolator? I own a Krups espresso machine and a good French press. I like them both, but I still prefer my ancient percolator.

    I've used a campfire-top percolator: Does that count? 😆
  • L1zardQueenL1zardQueen Member Posts: 8,645 Member Member Posts: 8,645 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    MsCzar wrote: »
    Am I the last person on earth to use a stove-top percolator? I own a Krups espresso machine and a good French press. I like them both, but I still prefer my ancient percolator.

    I've used a campfire-top percolator: Does that count? 😆

    Yes. Lol. I just ordered one for camping.
  • lynn_glenmontlynn_glenmont Member Posts: 8,696 Member Member Posts: 8,696 Member
    I don't expect any converts, but the reason an electric percolator makes the best coffee is the temperature. A french press starts out around 180F and goes down from there. By the time if is poured it is closer to 160 and that is starting with a boiling kettle.

    Electric percolator superheats the water in the base (steam) and delivers very close to boiling water, over and over again. Hence the full bodied flavor not possible with a French press. If I could tell you how many lab experiments were conducted on this you would laugh out loud. But, trust me. it has been extensively researched.


    By the time I drink it, it's going to be a lot less than 160F, no matter what it started out. You can't taste the coffee if you burn all your tastebuds. :smile:

    Seriously, though, was the research on the temperature of the water in the different methods, or the taste of the coffee in the different methods? The hotter the water when it hits the beans, the more likely you are to extract the bitter flavors, is my understanding. There's a reason why cold brew is so popular.

    Cold brew may be popular but it would never stand up in a blind tasting if compared to just about anything made conventionally and then cooled down.

    The aromatic esters that come off the beans early and at lower temperature are quite acidic. Very bitter. The higher temperature extractions are quite full bodied and mild. In an instant coffee spray tower, they blow off the esters into a scrubber and discard the condensate. Some makers use the esters in secret process.

    You could easily see these principles at work by tasting the french press grounds with a second flush of boiling hot water. It will be unappealingly weak. But not bitter.

    I drink my coffee black, no sugar. Cold brew is so far from bitter that it's just short of too sweet to drink. And acidic and bitter are two different things, correlating to two different kinds of taste receptors.
  • DancingMoosieDancingMoosie Member Posts: 7,133 Member Member Posts: 7,133 Member
    I use a brew'ngo. I also have a stovetop percolator. Really thinking I should have gotten electric. It takes about 15 min to brew in my percolator, and then it is way too hot to drink for a while, and I don't have time for all that.
  • wilson10102018wilson10102018 Member Posts: 984 Member Member Posts: 984 Member
    I don't expect any converts, but the reason an electric percolator makes the best coffee is the temperature. A french press starts out around 180F and goes down from there. By the time if is poured it is closer to 160 and that is starting with a boiling kettle.

    Electric percolator superheats the water in the base (steam) and delivers very close to boiling water, over and over again. Hence the full bodied flavor not possible with a French press. If I could tell you how many lab experiments were conducted on this you would laugh out loud. But, trust me. it has been extensively researched.


    By the time I drink it, it's going to be a lot less than 160F, no matter what it started out. You can't taste the coffee if you burn all your tastebuds. :smile:

    Seriously, though, was the research on the temperature of the water in the different methods, or the taste of the coffee in the different methods? The hotter the water when it hits the beans, the more likely you are to extract the bitter flavors, is my understanding. There's a reason why cold brew is so popular.

    Cold brew may be popular but it would never stand up in a blind tasting if compared to just about anything made conventionally and then cooled down.

    The aromatic esters that come off the beans early and at lower temperature are quite acidic. Very bitter. The higher temperature extractions are quite full bodied and mild. In an instant coffee spray tower, they blow off the esters into a scrubber and discard the condensate. Some makers use the esters in secret process.

    You could easily see these principles at work by tasting the french press grounds with a second flush of boiling hot water. It will be unappealingly weak. But not bitter.

    I drink my coffee black, no sugar. Cold brew is so far from bitter that it's just short of too sweet to drink. And acidic and bitter are two different things, correlating to two different kinds of taste receptors.

    I don't think I said a single thing about cold brew being bitter., Its probably the opposite. Just not very good.
  • lynn_glenmontlynn_glenmont Member Posts: 8,696 Member Member Posts: 8,696 Member
    I don't expect any converts, but the reason an electric percolator makes the best coffee is the temperature. A french press starts out around 180F and goes down from there. By the time if is poured it is closer to 160 and that is starting with a boiling kettle.

    Electric percolator superheats the water in the base (steam) and delivers very close to boiling water, over and over again. Hence the full bodied flavor not possible with a French press. If I could tell you how many lab experiments were conducted on this you would laugh out loud. But, trust me. it has been extensively researched.


    By the time I drink it, it's going to be a lot less than 160F, no matter what it started out. You can't taste the coffee if you burn all your tastebuds. :smile:

    Seriously, though, was the research on the temperature of the water in the different methods, or the taste of the coffee in the different methods? The hotter the water when it hits the beans, the more likely you are to extract the bitter flavors, is my understanding. There's a reason why cold brew is so popular.

    Cold brew may be popular but it would never stand up in a blind tasting if compared to just about anything made conventionally and then cooled down.

    The aromatic esters that come off the beans early and at lower temperature are quite acidic. Very bitter. The higher temperature extractions are quite full bodied and mild. In an instant coffee spray tower, they blow off the esters into a scrubber and discard the condensate. Some makers use the esters in secret process.

    You could easily see these principles at work by tasting the french press grounds with a second flush of boiling hot water. It will be unappealingly weak. But not bitter.

    I drink my coffee black, no sugar. Cold brew is so far from bitter that it's just short of too sweet to drink. And acidic and bitter are two different things, correlating to two different kinds of taste receptors.

    I don't think I said a single thing about cold brew being bitter., Its probably the opposite. Just not very good.

    Perhaps I'm misinterpreting, but I don't know what else this could mean.

    Cold brew may be popular but it would never stand up in a blind tasting if compared to just about anything made conventionally and then cooled down.

    The aromatic esters that come off the beans early and at lower temperature are quite acidic. Very bitter.
  • MsCzarMsCzar Member Posts: 375 Member Member Posts: 375 Member
    I use a brew'ngo. I also have a stovetop percolator. Really thinking I should have gotten electric. It takes about 15 min to brew in my percolator, and then it is way too hot to drink for a while, and I don't have time for all that.

    Whoa! I hope that includes the time it takes to bring the water up to a boil. I grind Mayorga Cubano whole beans every morning into either a three cup or two cup stove-top percolator. Yes, I have several! :D Once the perk starts, it's four minutes until it's done. ,

    Edited to add: I also have a Brew-n-Go, but only use it if I'll be super pressed for time in the morning and will be using the to-go mug that comes with that coffee-maker.
    edited January 26
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Member Posts: 7,220 Member Member Posts: 7,220 Member
    I drink way too much coffee, but use a french press or chemex. I have a kettle, which is great with the chemex.
  • wilson10102018wilson10102018 Member Posts: 984 Member Member Posts: 984 Member
    I don't expect any converts, but the reason an electric percolator makes the best coffee is the temperature. A french press starts out around 180F and goes down from there. By the time if is poured it is closer to 160 and that is starting with a boiling kettle.

    Electric percolator superheats the water in the base (steam) and delivers very close to boiling water, over and over again. Hence the full bodied flavor not possible with a French press. If I could tell you how many lab experiments were conducted on this you would laugh out loud. But, trust me. it has been extensively researched.


    By the time I drink it, it's going to be a lot less than 160F, no matter what it started out. You can't taste the coffee if you burn all your tastebuds. :smile:

    Seriously, though, was the research on the temperature of the water in the different methods, or the taste of the coffee in the different methods? The hotter the water when it hits the beans, the more likely you are to extract the bitter flavors, is my understanding. There's a reason why cold brew is so popular.

    Cold brew may be popular but it would never stand up in a blind tasting if compared to just about anything made conventionally and then cooled down.

    The aromatic esters that come off the beans early and at lower temperature are quite acidic. Very bitter. The higher temperature extractions are quite full bodied and mild. In an instant coffee spray tower, they blow off the esters into a scrubber and discard the condensate. Some makers use the esters in secret process.

    You could easily see these principles at work by tasting the french press grounds with a second flush of boiling hot water. It will be unappealingly weak. But not bitter.

    I drink my coffee black, no sugar. Cold brew is so far from bitter that it's just short of too sweet to drink. And acidic and bitter are two different things, correlating to two different kinds of taste receptors.

    I don't think I said a single thing about cold brew being bitter., Its probably the opposite. Just not very good.

    Perhaps I'm misinterpreting, but I don't know what else this could mean.

    Cold brew may be popular but it would never stand up in a blind tasting if compared to just about anything made conventionally and then cooled down.

    The aromatic esters that come off the beans early and at lower temperature are quite acidic. Very bitter.

    It means nothing of the kind.
  • DancingMoosieDancingMoosie Member Posts: 7,133 Member Member Posts: 7,133 Member
    MsCzar wrote: »
    I use a brew'ngo. I also have a stovetop percolator. Really thinking I should have gotten electric. It takes about 15 min to brew in my percolator, and then it is way too hot to drink for a while, and I don't have time for all that.

    Whoa! I hope that includes the time it takes to bring the water up to a boil. I grind Mayorga Cubano whole beans every morning into either a three cup or two cup stove-top percolator. Yes, I have several! :D Once the perk starts, it's four minutes until it's done. ,

    Edited to add: I also have a Brew-n-Go, but only use it if I'll be super pressed for time in the morning and will be using the to-go mug that comes with that coffee-maker.

    Yes, including time to boil. The brew and go brews into my mug(which I prep with protein blended in soymilk) and is ready to drink within a few minutes...just long enough to feed, let my dogs out, pick up their bowls, and let them back in again.
  • youngmomtazyoungmomtaz Member Posts: 1,082 Member Member Posts: 1,082 Member
    MsCzar wrote: »
    Am I the last person on earth to use a stove-top percolator? I own a Krups espresso machine and a good French press. I like them both, but I still prefer my ancient percolator.

    I had not used one for years until two summers ago when we started going up to a friends newly purchased fishing lodge in northern Saskatchewan. It needed some work to get ready for guests that year and this year with his expected influx of guests from the US having to cancel, we went again and did further upkeep to some older cabins that he didn’t not plan on using yet. Anyway, the gas stove and perk made such nice coffee I went and found myself an old beat up enamel perk for the camping gear. Cant wait to use it this summer when car camping. Too bad it is too big for my backpacking adventures.
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