Craving

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Replies

  • Rocinante314
    Rocinante314 Posts: 13 Member
    Stress is hard, and I am not sure what to say on eating, dieting, and stress. I live a pretty stress free life (Kids are grown :smile: ) I think the stress is something to address first. Love yourself even if you let yourself eat for fun. My struggle is eating out of boredom, and my job is in front of a computer. Practice love and forgiveness, even to him during this time, and radiate love to your children. Let the lawyer take the stress. I hope for you. This will pass. Stay on the exercise as it helps your mind deal with situations! Take care and good luck!
  • tinkerbellang83
    tinkerbellang83 Posts: 9,058 Member
    freda78 wrote: »
    Pick an easier weekly weight loss goal. 1200 is too low. The higher your calorie goal but still lose weight is best.

    Inevitably when people talk about cravings some one will say "eat more". If only it was that simple as "eating more" really doesn't work, if it did cravings would not be something you get even when you "eat more".

    Personally, I also find the suggestion of eating a less calorific alternative to the food being craved does not work either as I would eat that and still want the craved for foods.

    So for me, the only answer is having the will power to resist and for me, I do find it easier in the long run when I do resist as giving in today can lead to me giving in again in a few days time while when I resist the craving become less frequent.

    And instead I have planned treat days when I allow myself to have some of the food I do not have as part of my day-to-day "diet plan", for example bread, cheese and chocolate, and do not count the calories. I buy on the day and only what I am going to eat that day. This I find, in the main, keeps the cravings at bay as I know around once a month I am going to be having the very foods that I get cravings for,

    The reason the answer is often "eat more" is because many people pick a rate of loss that is too aggressive, often going for the fastest rate of loss, rather than a more sustainable rate of loss. If they are choosing a rate that is too aggressive there is a strong likelihood that the cravings are down to being actually hungry because they're not eating enough to fuel their daily activity/exercise sufficiently. I always find my cravings are worst if I tell myself something is off limits except for one or two things that I consider trigger foods for which Willpower is the only way.

    Based on the stats given, if OP were to choose 1lb per week instead she'll have around 1400 + exercise calories to play with instead of 1200 + exercise calories and that will leave a little extra room for things they enjoy but perhaps in smaller portions, which may be the difference between them sticking to it long term and losing the weight albeit slightly slower than giving up because they find it too dificult.

  • mcaesar811
    mcaesar811 Posts: 23 Member
    Thank you everyone!!! All of the advice is so appreciated!!
  • freda666
    freda666 Posts: 338 Member
    freda78 wrote: »
    Pick an easier weekly weight loss goal. 1200 is too low. The higher your calorie goal but still lose weight is best.

    Inevitably when people talk about cravings some one will say "eat more". If only it was that simple as "eating more" really doesn't work, if it did cravings would not be something you get even when you "eat more".

    Personally, I also find the suggestion of eating a less calorific alternative to the food being craved does not work either as I would eat that and still want the craved for foods.

    So for me, the only answer is having the will power to resist and for me, I do find it easier in the long run when I do resist as giving in today can lead to me giving in again in a few days time while when I resist the craving become less frequent.

    And instead I have planned treat days when I allow myself to have some of the food I do not have as part of my day-to-day "diet plan", for example bread, cheese and chocolate, and do not count the calories. I buy on the day and only what I am going to eat that day. This I find, in the main, keeps the cravings at bay as I know around once a month I am going to be having the very foods that I get cravings for,

    The reason the answer is often "eat more" is because many people pick a rate of loss that is too aggressive, often going for the fastest rate of loss, rather than a more sustainable rate of loss.

    I get the idea behind the suggestion but unfortunately for many of us cravings are not a function of hunger.
  • tinkerbellang83
    tinkerbellang83 Posts: 9,058 Member
    freda78 wrote: »
    freda78 wrote: »
    Pick an easier weekly weight loss goal. 1200 is too low. The higher your calorie goal but still lose weight is best.

    Inevitably when people talk about cravings some one will say "eat more". If only it was that simple as "eating more" really doesn't work, if it did cravings would not be something you get even when you "eat more".

    Personally, I also find the suggestion of eating a less calorific alternative to the food being craved does not work either as I would eat that and still want the craved for foods.

    So for me, the only answer is having the will power to resist and for me, I do find it easier in the long run when I do resist as giving in today can lead to me giving in again in a few days time while when I resist the craving become less frequent.

    And instead I have planned treat days when I allow myself to have some of the food I do not have as part of my day-to-day "diet plan", for example bread, cheese and chocolate, and do not count the calories. I buy on the day and only what I am going to eat that day. This I find, in the main, keeps the cravings at bay as I know around once a month I am going to be having the very foods that I get cravings for,

    The reason the answer is often "eat more" is because many people pick a rate of loss that is too aggressive, often going for the fastest rate of loss, rather than a more sustainable rate of loss.

    I get the idea behind the suggestion but unfortunately for many of us cravings are not a function of hunger.

    Myself included, I suffer with binge eating but that is still made worse if I under eat, so it makes sense to first ensure that OP is eating enough before telling them to try and struggle on with willpower alone when undereating might be their only cause for cravings.
  • MichelleMcKeeRN
    MichelleMcKeeRN Posts: 422 Member
    I use to have pretty intense cravings but I think I have it worked out. I allow myself up to 1650 calories a day. If I was really struggling, I would allow myself 2150 calories (maintenance calories). I found when I am having cravings, I often am just hungry. If I eat a nutritious well rounded meal, the cravings go away. Have you tried these things?
  • SouthWestLondon
    SouthWestLondon Posts: 135 Member
    I'm only on week six of this, but I think I love all the same food as you - fried, salty food is the best!

    But things that have worked for me have been:

    1. I don't 'cheat', but I do eat what I want. Thinking of it as cheating just makes the food even more tempting and dangerous - and the 'cheat' mindset always meant that when I slipped up, I would disregard portion control or getting back on the wagon. Now I allow myself to eat whatever I like within my calories. Sometimes (usually weekends) I allow that to be small portions of fried food and take out. This is all about choices - if I choose a high calorie option, I know it means I'll need a smaller lunch and breakfast to fit within my calories. But that's fine.

    2. I try and 'backload' my less healthy choices. In other words, I try and keep my calories down during the day. Low calorie, high protein breakfast and lunch, with no snacking gives me the calories to use on less healthy choices in the evening. This means that if I am craving something during the day, I can have willpower because I can look forward to something tasty in the evening. And it means that I can 'afford' something less healthy in the evening.

    3. Water really helps curb my cravings. I don't actually much like plain water, so I have sugar free squash, but the effect is the same. The water fills me up and staves off some cravings. BUT I do not drink half hour either side of meals. Doing so confuses my brain about whether I'm full from food (which will keep me satisfied for some time), or full from water (which will not satisfy me for long as it passes through my tummy). So lots of water throughout the day (even if I'm not thirsty - just make it a habit) and none around mealtimes.

    4. Work out when you're most susceptible to cravings, and try and plan to use those times in ways that prevent you or distract you from giving in. For me, it's about 11am to lunch time and 4pm to dinner time. During work days, I try and schedule meetings at those times because if I'm in a meeting with people, I can't be eating. And I try and get in a long walk around 5 or 6pm, because then when I get back it's close enough to dinner time that I can hold out. Your activities might be different - find something that works for you - but try and schedule those activities for when you know you're at higher risk of cravings.

    5. I do all this with 1750 calories a day average(5' 8" male, 205lbs now). But I try and stay under that most days to 'save up' calories that allow me a bit more flexibility at the weekend. I would really struggle on 1200 calories, so I'd tend to agree with others that upping your calories to give yourself a bit more leeway to eat some of the foods you like might be sensible.

    6. The main thing is that I always measure, weigh and track my foods. This has been a game changer. Even if I'm making a less healthy choice, weighing and tracking (a) helps me manage my portions and make 'mini-healthy' choices (e.g. four chicken nuggets instead of six etc); and (b) sometimes it helps give me the willpower to resist cravings. My approach is NOTHING is off limits, just record it first. Sometimes, when I'm about to give in, by recording it, and seeing the calories rachet up, that helps me say no, and then I'll delete the food entry and feel quite proud of myself. But if I record it and choose to go ahead and eat it, that's cool too.

  • mcaesar811
    mcaesar811 Posts: 23 Member
    I use to have pretty intense cravings but I think I have it worked out. I allow myself up to 1650 calories a day. If I was really struggling, I would allow myself 2150 calories (maintenance calories). I found when I am having cravings, I often am just hungry. If I eat a nutritious well rounded meal, the cravings go away. Have you tried these things?

    @MichelleMcKeeRN yes, you are so right. Anytime I have a craving and eat a meal instead it usually goes away. I’ve been trying that this week and planning in treats. Like today I knew I would be baking cookies with my daughter so I left the rice out of my dinner and had a cookie.
  • mcaesar811
    mcaesar811 Posts: 23 Member
    @SouthWestLondon great advice!!! Thank you!
  • Hope228
    Hope228 Posts: 340 Member
    I agree with Jogo. I brush my teeth when I am tempted. Also, ice water or a cup of chamomile tea help me. I worked with students that have multiple disabilities for 17 years. If you ever need to talk, friend me. I am sending you a hug. You are going through a lot. Hang in there! <3