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Hᴇᴀʀᴛ Rᴀᴛᴇ Cᴏɴᴄᴇʀɴs

ssmith0903ssmith0903 Member Posts: 25 Member Member Posts: 25 Member
𝐼 ℎ𝑎𝑣𝑒 𝑟𝑒𝑐𝑒𝑛𝑡𝑙𝑦 𝑏𝑒𝑒𝑛 𝑔𝑜𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑏𝑎𝑐𝑘 𝑡𝑜 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑔𝑦𝑚. 𝐻𝑜𝑤𝑒𝑣𝑒𝑟 𝐼 𝑎𝑚 𝑤𝑜𝑟𝑟𝑖𝑒𝑑 𝑎𝑏𝑜𝑢𝑡 𝑚𝑦 ℎ𝑒𝑎𝑟𝑡 𝑟𝑎𝑡𝑒 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑖𝑚 𝑛𝑜𝑡 𝑠𝑢𝑟𝑒 𝑖𝑓 𝑤ℎ𝑎𝑡 𝑖𝑚 𝑑𝑜𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑖𝑠 𝑜𝑘.

I seem to be hitting a heart rate around 210 every trip

𝙸𝚏 𝚢𝚘𝚞 𝚑𝚊𝚟𝚎 𝚊𝚗𝚢 𝚜𝚞𝚐𝚐𝚎𝚜𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗𝚜 𝚏𝚘𝚛 𝚊 𝚗𝚎𝚠𝚌𝚘𝚖𝚎𝚛 𝚒𝚗 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚐𝚢𝚖 𝚠𝚑𝚘𝚜 𝚘𝚞𝚝 𝚘𝚏 𝚜𝚑𝚊𝚙𝚎 𝚙𝚕𝚎𝚊𝚜𝚎 𝚜𝚑𝚊𝚛𝚎 🥺♥️
edited April 16

Replies

  • dolorsitdolorsit Member Posts: 92 Member Member Posts: 92 Member
    How are you measuring your heart rate? 210 isn't beyond the bounds of reason, but it isn't likely you'd reach that without knowing you really earnt it. I would double check your device/heart rate monitor by manually counting your pulse beats for 15s. Many types of heart rate monitor commonly misread.
  • ssmith0903ssmith0903 Member Posts: 25 Member Member Posts: 25 Member
    YellowD0gs wrote: »
    210?!?! If you're concerned, you should seek a medical professional, not an internet forum. You might also check to see if you're gym has a certified trainer who can get you started with an appropriate level of exercise for your level of experience. Work your way to health, don't just do it in one jump.

    I am more so asking if others have experienced this and what are some good starter workouts with those obviously out of shape. Not seeking medical advice specifically. I understand though, Thank you for the reply.
  • ssmith0903ssmith0903 Member Posts: 25 Member Member Posts: 25 Member
    dolorsit wrote: »
    How are you measuring your heart rate? 210 isn't beyond the bounds of reason, but it isn't likely you'd reach that without knowing you really earnt it. I would double check your device/heart rate monitor by manually counting your pulse beats for 15s. Many types of heart rate monitor commonly misread.

    I use my apple watch to monitor it and I've checked it. It seems to be fairly accurate. I most definitely can tell when my heart rates reaching that peak and I try to slow it down when it starts getting to that point out of fear of overdoing it I suppose.
  • MikePfirrmanMikePfirrman Member Posts: 2,577 Member Member Posts: 2,577 Member
    Some HR monitors (Polar has been my experience) are wildly erratic. Like @dolorsit said, 210 isn't out of the realm of possibility for a younger person. I regularly hit mid 180s (and sometimes high 180s) and I'm 56. But as a self-proclaimed newcomer that's out of shape, you probably are pushing too hard.

    Pay attention also to how fast your HR is recovering. That's even more important. If you stop or slow down, how long is it taking to go down? If it's not significantly moving down within 30 to 45 seconds, you definitely shouldn't be pushing it that hard.

    Slow and steady wins the race. Don't try to kill it at the gym. Incremental improvements are fantastic and you'll be less likely to hurt yourself.

    I was in a Spin class one time and had been going at it (even overweight) for around a year. A thinner guy that looked to be in shape came in with his wife and tried to push it on his first class. They had to have the paramedics come because he had heart issues. Take it slow and stay safe until you build your cardio base up. HIIT or "Bootcamp" classes are too intense if you don't have some cardio foundation.

    The trick with HR is it's hard to know your max unless you're highly trained (workout for at least 3 to 6 months regularly and can safely push it a bit to even find out what your max is). Once you do know your max, 90% of max feels pretty awful. 95% feels like your drowning because oxygen isn't keeping up to demand for it. I've never seen 100% (and really few should) and don't care to.

    Pay attention to your body. You should not be gasping for air as a newcomer.

    If you have any pictures of what it looks like (from an app), that might help to know if it's regular or a blip.
    edited April 16
  • NorthCascadesNorthCascades Member Posts: 10,457 Member Member Posts: 10,457 Member
    Your HRM is getting the wrong HR.

    Wear a chest strap one day and compare the readings to be sure for yourself. Or stop and do a manual count, only has to happen once.
  • MikePfirrmanMikePfirrman Member Posts: 2,577 Member Member Posts: 2,577 Member
    Apple Watches are pretty famous for ridiculous HR spikes (that aren't real) out of nowhere. I have a feeling that's a glitch.
  • ninerbuffninerbuff Member, Greeter Posts: 45,218 Member Member, Greeter Posts: 45,218 Member
    How's your breathing? Are you gasping for air and can hardly catch your breath?

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

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  • JthanmyfitnesspalJthanmyfitnesspal Member, Premium Posts: 2,815 Member Member, Premium Posts: 2,815 Member
    Count your HR with a stop watch to be sure. Talk to your doctor. Be careful. But, don't give up?
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