Weight loss myths

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13

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  • Theoldguy1
    Theoldguy1 Posts: 2,473 Member
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    vpeaches wrote: »
    Sometimes nutrition labels will list a food as 0 calories per serving, but truthfully, food companies are allowed to round down to 0 calories if the food item is actually something like 0.4 calories. Multiple servings can in fact accumulate calories- though the amount is negligible, this could be an issue for people who are trying to do a fast.

    No it's not an issue.
  • aacha0908
    aacha0908 Posts: 12 Member
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    I saw a headline as I was checking out at the grocery store : LOSE 56 POUNDS BY MEMORIAL DAY!!!!!!

    The magazine’s “date” was April 25th. Now correct me if I’m wrong, but that’s 56 pounds in 36 days.

    And we wonder why people come here and quit when they don’t lose ten pounds their first week. People’s expectations are so skewed because of unscrupulous media, marketers , and social media.

    I agree about unrealistic expectations, but I also think that lack of commitment plays a huge part in why people quit.
  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,763 Member
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    aacha0908 wrote: »
    I saw a headline as I was checking out at the grocery store : LOSE 56 POUNDS BY MEMORIAL DAY!!!!!!

    The magazine’s “date” was April 25th. Now correct me if I’m wrong, but that’s 56 pounds in 36 days.

    And we wonder why people come here and quit when they don’t lose ten pounds their first week. People’s expectations are so skewed because of unscrupulous media, marketers , and social media.

    I agree about unrealistic expectations, but I also think that lack of commitment plays a huge part in why people quit.

    I think that's true, but I also think it's worth being careful about how we express that and to be strict about how we define it. One myth about overweight people, so maybe not weight loss itself, is that they aren't capable of committing to *anything*, or they aren't disciplined about *anything.* We often assume that excess weight is a sign of multiple serious moral failings. I even catch myself thinking this way sometimes, as an obese person who really knows better!

    So sure, people quit trying to lose weight because they decide it's not something they want to prioritize. I've done that. But in many other areas of my life I've been a very committed and disciplined person. I'm still learning how to do it with this. Some of the skills and habits translate, but not all. And there's other stuff to work through that doesn't apply in other areas - probably part of why I've historically put this one off for so long!

    So well said.
  • aacha0908
    aacha0908 Posts: 12 Member
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    aacha0908 wrote: »
    I saw a headline as I was checking out at the grocery store : LOSE 56 POUNDS BY MEMORIAL DAY!!!!!!

    The magazine’s “date” was April 25th. Now correct me if I’m wrong, but that’s 56 pounds in 36 days.

    And we wonder why people come here and quit when they don’t lose ten pounds their first week. People’s expectations are so skewed because of unscrupulous media, marketers , and social media.

    I agree about unrealistic expectations, but I also think that lack of commitment plays a huge part in why people quit.

    I think that's true, but I also think it's worth being careful about how we express that and to be strict about how we define it. One myth about overweight people, so maybe not weight loss itself, is that they aren't capable of committing to *anything*, or they aren't disciplined about *anything.* We often assume that excess weight is a sign of multiple serious moral failings. I even catch myself thinking this way sometimes, as an obese person who really knows better!

    So sure, people quit trying to lose weight because they decide it's not something they want to prioritize. I've done that. But in many other areas of my life I've been a very committed and disciplined person. I'm still learning how to do it with this. Some of the skills and habits translate, but not all. And there's other stuff to work through that doesn't apply in other areas - probably part of why I've historically put this one off for so long!

    @penguinmama87 Well said, however when I replied to a comment, I was talking about people who start the weight loss journey, and once they get to an obstacle (the pounds are not dropping fast enough, expectations are too high, exercising routine is harder than what they expected it to be, body aches after exercising, not having enough time to read labels or count the calories) quit. Not because their priorities shifts, like you said, but because they were discouraged by an obstacle. I did not say obese people quit because they can't commit to anything.
    I think you are right in saying that some people often assume that excess weight is a sign of multiple serious moral failings, and it is essential to understand that it's not always the case.
  • aacha0908
    aacha0908 Posts: 12 Member
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    aacha0908 wrote: »
    I saw a headline as I was checking out at the grocery store : LOSE 56 POUNDS BY MEMORIAL DAY!!!!!!

    The magazine’s “date” was April 25th. Now correct me if I’m wrong, but that’s 56 pounds in 36 days.

    And we wonder why people come here and quit when they don’t lose ten pounds their first week. People’s expectations are so skewed because of unscrupulous media, marketers , and social media.

    I agree about unrealistic expectations, but I also think that lack of commitment plays a huge part in why people quit.

    I think that's true, but I also think it's worth being careful about how we express that and to be strict about how we define it. One myth about overweight people, so maybe not weight loss itself, is that they aren't capable of committing to *anything*, or they aren't disciplined about *anything.* We often assume that excess weight is a sign of multiple serious moral failings. I even catch myself thinking this way sometimes, as an obese person who really knows better!

    So sure, people quit trying to lose weight because they decide it's not something they want to prioritize. I've done that. But in many other areas of my life I've been a very committed and disciplined person. I'm still learning how to do it with this. Some of the skills and habits translate, but not all. And there's other stuff to work through that doesn't apply in other areas - probably part of why I've historically put this one off for so long!

    Yep, this.

    The reason I got fat and stayed fat - obese even - was not that I could not commit to anything. It was that I spent a long time at the bottom of my own priority list. That mean I committed to just about everything BUT Myself and my own health/well being/fitness in many levels.

    Not that I couldn't commit to anything or work toward anything. I was just the least important thing in my life.

    That's a whole different sort of problem. But it isn't a lack of morals.

    @wunderkindking What you said seems like it was not a failed commitment to lose weight; it is just that your priorities were different.
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 41,874 Member
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    "Body Confusion"
  • Silentpadna
    Silentpadna Posts: 1,306 Member
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    "You might be suffering from insulin resistance....which traps fat cells in your body. You need G_L_."

    Ugh.
  • penguinmama87
    penguinmama87 Posts: 1,158 Member
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    aacha0908 wrote: »
    aacha0908 wrote: »
    I saw a headline as I was checking out at the grocery store : LOSE 56 POUNDS BY MEMORIAL DAY!!!!!!

    The magazine’s “date” was April 25th. Now correct me if I’m wrong, but that’s 56 pounds in 36 days.

    And we wonder why people come here and quit when they don’t lose ten pounds their first week. People’s expectations are so skewed because of unscrupulous media, marketers , and social media.

    I agree about unrealistic expectations, but I also think that lack of commitment plays a huge part in why people quit.

    I think that's true, but I also think it's worth being careful about how we express that and to be strict about how we define it. One myth about overweight people, so maybe not weight loss itself, is that they aren't capable of committing to *anything*, or they aren't disciplined about *anything.* We often assume that excess weight is a sign of multiple serious moral failings. I even catch myself thinking this way sometimes, as an obese person who really knows better!

    So sure, people quit trying to lose weight because they decide it's not something they want to prioritize. I've done that. But in many other areas of my life I've been a very committed and disciplined person. I'm still learning how to do it with this. Some of the skills and habits translate, but not all. And there's other stuff to work through that doesn't apply in other areas - probably part of why I've historically put this one off for so long!

    @penguinmama87 Well said, however when I replied to a comment, I was talking about people who start the weight loss journey, and once they get to an obstacle (the pounds are not dropping fast enough, expectations are too high, exercising routine is harder than what they expected it to be, body aches after exercising, not having enough time to read labels or count the calories) quit. Not because their priorities shifts, like you said, but because they were discouraged by an obstacle. I did not say obese people quit because they can't commit to anything.
    I think you are right in saying that some people often assume that excess weight is a sign of multiple serious moral failings, and it is essential to understand that it's not always the case.

    I think you're right, but the reason I said what I did was because "not being committed" is (in my experience, anyway) frequently a reason to dismiss a person's struggle, who might actually be more likely to succeed if provided with the right resources or support. Learned helplessness is a real phenomenon, but for a person who reaches an obstacle and doesn't know how to get around it, endlessly spinning their wheels isn't really more meritorious than saying, "Well, I'm going to do this other thing instead because I know something about how to do that." I think being open and realistic about what it's like to lose weight helps manage expectations appropriately. If you think dieting is always miserable and endless suffering, then yeah, I'd want to throw in the towel too (and I have, back when I thought that.) A lot of people can endure intense suffering for short spurts of time with a known end point. But if there's no end in sight, yeah, many of them will give up. Who would put themselves through that? It's a good thing it doesn't have to be like that with weight loss.
  • ShrinkingDucky
    ShrinkingDucky Posts: 12 Member
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    The need to eat less bread.

    This came from my stepmother who saw no issue with the amount of porridge (oatmeal), pasta or cheese eaten, it was all the evil evil bread!
  • paperpudding
    paperpudding Posts: 9,017 Member
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    Since I got a lot of disagrees on my "You must use a food scale to weigh all your food" (unsurprisingly), I"ll piggyback off of that:

    The myth that there is a one-size-fits-all approach to weight loss, whether that be using an app like MFP, doing keto, IF, intuitive eating, etc. Nope. Obviously we're all here on MFP because it works for us, is working, or believe it will work. Doesn't mean that one HAS to use it to lose weight, or even track calories, macros, etc. People can and do lose weight using Intuitive Eating...honestly wish I could be one of them. Just because it did/didn't work for you (or you don't think it would), doesn't mean it can't work for someone else.


    Yes, that is true.

    Whilst many of the myths here are clearly myths - so is the food scale must and sometimes it's sister Log everything to the minutest detail

    Clearly counting calories and food weighing is integral to MFP method - but it isn't the only method or pathway to success, nor is using that method exactly the same way as others do.
  • springlering62
    springlering62 Posts: 7,585 Member
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    😮
    From another thread:
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  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,885 Member
    edited April 2021
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    Since I got a lot of disagrees on my "You must use a food scale to weigh all your food" (unsurprisingly), I"ll piggyback off of that:

    The myth that there is a one-size-fits-all approach to weight loss, whether that be using an app like MFP, doing keto, IF, intuitive eating, etc. Nope. Obviously we're all here on MFP because it works for us, is working, or believe it will work. Doesn't mean that one HAS to use it to lose weight, or even track calories, macros, etc. People can and do lose weight using Intuitive Eating...honestly wish I could be one of them. Just because it did/didn't work for you (or you don't think it would), doesn't mean it can't work for someone else.

    Totally agree with this, and didn't disagree, but looking back I suspect the disagrees weren't with saying a food scale is not required for all (which I think is broadly accepted by most at MFP), but the implication that the elimination diet made fat loss faster than a similar deficit. But I am not at all sure you meant that, I just think the prior post might have been interpreted to mean that.

    Or maybe people were disagreeing with the notion that "one has to use a scale" is a myth, as it's rare to find someone who believes that IME.

    You just never know why someone disagrees (and I do wish people would explain if it hasn't already been explained).