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What is "fit", to you?

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Replies

  • J72FIT
    J72FIT Posts: 5,960 Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    IMO, "fit" is applied to the physical fitness you need to do whatever sport, hobby, job, etc. If you can do it well without gassing out or passing out, then you're fit for it. I'm fit for kickboxing, but not for long distance running. Same for weight lifting, but not for working on a farm.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    Yeah I would also add there is the idea of general fitness, being fit for every day life and sport specific fitness. And of course within that context are different levels of fitness...
  • mummysinthekitchen
    mummysinthekitchen Posts: 12 Member
    Sorry, late to the party as always.

    My idea of fit for myself is to be able to wear a bikini at the beach with my kids and not have my girls gain an idea of body hating or being ashamed of how they look from watching me.

    Also, to be able to keep up with my Son and his love of mountain biking and hiking for hours.

    I'm not quite there yet on any score but I will be this year!
  • Beverly2Hansen
    Beverly2Hansen Posts: 378 Member
    Not fighting for my life when I walk up a hill for starters. Catching my breath after running across a street quickly. Being able to walk 5 miles a day. 30 legitimate push ups per day, 30 weighted squats per day and 30 donkey kicks. I consider that "fit". To be fit and healthy though I must also have a decent diet and weigh 130-140lbs at 5'5".
  • LisaGetsMoving
    LisaGetsMoving Posts: 664 Member
    edited April 2021
    My idea of fit is keeping up with the grandkids.
  • SabrinaJL
    SabrinaJL Posts: 1,579 Member
    edited April 2021
    WandRsmom wrote: »
    For me personally my idea of fit, *for myself* has changed over the yrs. I grew up (born in 79) believing i was *too large * to be fit for a woman. I was not overweight just what ppl called " broad shouldered , tall "... " Built like a linebacker" (direct quotes said to me basically from birth). And at that time women were to be Kate Moss thin. They weren't meant to be so "large"

    Yep. I got those exact same comments (also, "strong for a girl"). I didn't really realize what they were talking about when they said "broad-shouldered" until I lost weight and started trying to buy nice women's clothes (instead of wearing unisex tshirts all the time). Then I was like, "Oh. That's what they mean." It's annoying when clothes shopping but when I looked at my sister-in-law and her narrow, rounded shoulders, I realized I actually LIKE my broad shoulders.

    For me, fit is not getting winded when doing doing moderately strenuous things, being able to lift a decent amount without struggling and not having any weight-related health issues. I was put on blood pressure meds when I was 24. One of my main goals was to be able to stop taking them and I achieved that goal after a year of tracking, running and weight lifting.

  • kenyonhaff
    kenyonhaff Posts: 1,377 Member
    I think there are different kinds of "fit," with being physically fit just one component. One can be what many would consider "physically fit," but me a mess emotionally.

    As far as being physically fit, I think of it as 2 categories: functionally fit, and aesthetically or "train smart/hard for several years" fit. Within that, as within anything else, there are varying degrees. I'd consider myself functionally fit for the most part: I'm strong enough to complete things I need to do like lift heavy objects and walk up a couple of flights of stairs without getting winded and walk several blocks easily. However, I have some chronic aches/pains that even sometimes make ADL's a bit more difficult, despite working out/strength training regularly.

    Aesthetically fit to me is someone who "looks" strong: muscularly defined, can lift really heavy, etc.

    This got me thinking to an article I read a few years ago about the exercises you should be able to do if you think you are "really fit," and I could (and still can) only do a few. I had to look it up and see if I could find it (I did), and here they are:
    1. L-Sit
    2. Windshield Wipers
    3. Push Up
    4. Pistol Squat
    5. Candlestick Roll
    6. Handstand

    https://www.shape.com/fitness/workouts/best-bodyweight-exercises-strength?ref=quuu&utm_campaign=buffer&utm_content=buffer4d044&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com

    I STILL cannot do an L-sit or full range unsupported Pistol Squat.

    You always have to take this with a grain of salt, because there are different ways to be physically fit. There's not one universal measure.

    For example:

    In high school I was a competitive swimmer. There was a mile run that determined if you were as an athlete on an approved team, allowed to opt out of heavy cardio days. There was no other test. So yeah, all us swimmers--even the ones going to States--did terrible on this test. Was this a valid measure of cardio fitness for us? Not really.

    This can also become an issue with fitness standards based on male bodies. When tests are on discrete exercises (sit ups, push ups, etc.) women do less well. However, does the amount of push ups done mean a person is more able to handle a combat situation, or negotiate a burning building, or act as a lifeguard?
  • g2renew
    g2renew Posts: 145 Member
    To have enough strength, energy, and focus to do what needs to be done for the length of time it takes to do it and then some left over for 'fun' activities. It is at this point, a hope for the future:-).
  • To me fit is being able to enjoy everything life can bring and not think twice about doing it because your to big!