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What is "fit", to you?

WandRsmomWandRsmom Member Posts: 253 Member Member Posts: 253 Member
This may not need to be in the debate section but I wasn't sure where to put it.

I am just curious If there is an image of a "fit" person that you have, for yourself or in general. Like is your idea of fit based on a specific fitness goal, a specific physique, or BMI ?

Did you have a vision of what it meant to be "fit " at one time and it's changed for whatever reason?

Would love to see people's thoughts.
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Replies

  • WandRsmomWandRsmom Member Posts: 253 Member Member Posts: 253 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    My definition of me being fit is going to be completely meaningless to everyone but me and a yogini friend, but it's to be able to do my Om Namah Shivaya Inna Gadda Divida yoga routine regularly without hurting myself :lol:

    It takes cardiovascular fitness and upper body strength that I had when I was a full time yoga teacher and worked out regularly. I was also 40 pounds lighter back then.

    This fantastic! This exactly the kind of answer I was hoping for, *because* it's personal to you.


  • LGreenfield7LGreenfield7 Member Posts: 72 Member Member Posts: 72 Member
    ooooooo, I really like this question.... I feel like i classify "fit" and "healthy" differently. I think being fit is more tied into performance and aesthetic. For example, being a body builder, powerlifter, professional hockey player. All these guys and gals would have excellent performance and physiques but the starvation that a body build experiences is NOT healthy. The stress on athletes and powerlifters body's is not considered healthy. I think that health is more about conducting exercise in a way that encourages good motion, cardiovascular strength and a well balanced diet. My thoughts are very jumbled up on the topic.
  • Ddsb11Ddsb11 Member Posts: 608 Member Member Posts: 608 Member
    I agree with this definition: Physical fitness is a state of health and well-being and, more specifically, the ability to perform aspects of sports, occupations and daily activities. Physical fitness is generally achieved through proper nutrition, moderate-vigorous physical exercise, and sufficient rest.
  • KHMcGKHMcG Member Posts: 1,081 Member Member Posts: 1,081 Member
    I exercise for fun
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Member Posts: 7,194 Member Member Posts: 7,194 Member
    Fit does have a certain aesthetic component to me, but it's pretty varied. Mostly it has to do with performance, both athletic and functional. One could look great but if one gets winded walking up a few flights of stairs, then one isn't really fit. But of course one could be fit in the context of one activity (I'm back in running shape) but not be fit at something else. It really depends on context what I would mean by the term.
  • JthanmyfitnesspalJthanmyfitnesspal Member, Premium Posts: 2,744 Member Member, Premium Posts: 2,744 Member
    I think it is most important is to be "reasonably fit," which just means you can do a range of normal activities with relative ease, such as taking a walk perhaps up a modest hill, riding a bike, carrying your groceries in from the car, that sort of thing.

    Levels of fitness above that are not required, but can be achieved subject to personal preference-- basically how much time you want to invest in training for them. But, there are many things to focus on in life, and achieving a high-level of fitness is only one of them.
  • LietchiLietchi Member Posts: 2,060 Member Member Posts: 2,060 Member
    For me 'fit' means having good cardiovascular fitness and having a fair amount of (functional) strength.

    Being able to lift fairly heavy boxes when moving house, doing several flights of stairs without getting winded, stuff like that.

    I don't really have a specific physique in mind with that (looks can be deceiving), but I'd associate it more with people of an 'average' build (healthy bodyfat level, not too low, and slightly more than average muscle mass).
  • Speakeasy76Speakeasy76 Member Posts: 519 Member Member Posts: 519 Member
    I think there are different kinds of "fit," with being physically fit just one component. One can be what many would consider "physically fit," but me a mess emotionally.

    As far as being physically fit, I think of it as 2 categories: functionally fit, and aesthetically or "train smart/hard for several years" fit. Within that, as within anything else, there are varying degrees. I'd consider myself functionally fit for the most part: I'm strong enough to complete things I need to do like lift heavy objects and walk up a couple of flights of stairs without getting winded and walk several blocks easily. However, I have some chronic aches/pains that even sometimes make ADL's a bit more difficult, despite working out/strength training regularly.

    Aesthetically fit to me is someone who "looks" strong: muscularly defined, can lift really heavy, etc.

    This got me thinking to an article I read a few years ago about the exercises you should be able to do if you think you are "really fit," and I could (and still can) only do a few. I had to look it up and see if I could find it (I did), and here they are:
    1. L-Sit
    2. Windshield Wipers
    3. Push Up
    4. Pistol Squat
    5. Candlestick Roll
    6. Handstand

    https://www.shape.com/fitness/workouts/best-bodyweight-exercises-strength?ref=quuu&utm_campaign=buffer&utm_content=buffer4d044&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com

    I STILL cannot do an L-sit or full range unsupported Pistol Squat.
  • WandRsmomWandRsmom Member Posts: 253 Member Member Posts: 253 Member
    I think there are different kinds of "fit," with being physically fit just one component. One can be what many would consider "physically fit," but me a mess emotionally.

    As far as being physically fit, I think of it as 2 categories: functionally fit, and aesthetically or "train smart/hard for several years" fit. Within that, as within anything else, there are varying degrees. I'd consider myself functionally fit for the most part: I'm strong enough to complete things I need to do like lift heavy objects and walk up a couple of flights of stairs without getting winded and walk several blocks easily. However, I have some chronic aches/pains that even sometimes make ADL's a bit more difficult, despite working out/strength training regularly.

    Aesthetically fit to me is someone who "looks" strong: muscularly defined, can lift really heavy, etc.

    This got me thinking to an article I read a few years ago about the exercises you should be able to do if you think you are "really fit," and I could (and still can) only do a few. I had to look it up and see if I could find it (I did), and here they are:
    1. L-Sit
    2. Windshield Wipers
    3. Push Up
    4. Pistol Squat
    5. Candlestick Roll
    6. Handstand

    https://www.shape.com/fitness/workouts/best-bodyweight-exercises-strength?ref=quuu&utm_campaign=buffer&utm_content=buffer4d044&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com

    I STILL cannot do an L-sit or full range unsupported Pistol Squat.

    Love this! Thank you for sharing. I cannot do a handstand. I mean.. tbh I won't really try. I can do them against a wall with someone spotting me, but my fear really kicks in at the idea of just doing an unassisted handstand 😱😱😱. Nope. No way. 😂And my L sit is unreliable at best. (I have done it a couple times but failed trying more often than not, like 8 times out if ten I am not getting it done.)
  • ythannahythannah Member Posts: 3,686 Member Member Posts: 3,686 Member
    Lietchi wrote: »
    For me 'fit' means having good cardiovascular fitness and having a fair amount of (functional) strength.

    Being able to lift fairly heavy boxes when moving house, doing several flights of stairs without getting winded, stuff like that.

    Realistically, that would be my notion of "fit" also. Being able to pick up that 33 lb bag of dog kibble or the 20 kg bag of traction sand easily. Having a personal level of fitness that allows me to accomplish the tasks I need to.

    Long before I joined MFP I bought some rolls of sod to fill in some areas of the lawn and loading/unloading/carrying those things was a struggle. A few years after I got into weightlifting I bought some more rolls of sod and the difference in the way I was able to handle them told me that I was much "fitter" than the last time I played landscaper.
  • rlang2362rlang2362 Member Posts: 7 Member Member Posts: 7 Member
    I think the term ‘fit’ for me has definitely changed over the years. When I was younger I would have probably said someone who was muscly or toned without really thinking about anything else like diet or if they could run a 5km run. I think now I’m older (40) for me to class myself as fit I would need to eat a healthy nutritious diet, be toned and strong but able to cope cardiovascular wise too.
    I’m a postie and thought I was doing fairly well before this job but now walking 10 miles on average a day carrying a bag between 8-11kg has definitely made me realise I wasn’t and also I gained weight but lost inches so I would never consider BMI anymore rather just look in the mirror
  • LoveyCharLoveyChar Member Posts: 2,997 Member Member Posts: 2,997 Member
    Last time I said "I need to get in shape" (and yes, round is a shape but not the one I'd want one to carry) because I could not do something, for example run 1/3 of a mile, that was when I was not fit. So I worked on getting fit until I could run 20+ miles and to me that was being fit. Yes, it's definitely personal like asking someone what it means to be smart or kind or funny...
  • WandRsmomWandRsmom Member Posts: 253 Member Member Posts: 253 Member
    So. I posted this and didn't answer. I like so many of these replies and agree with them.

    For me personally my idea of fit, *for myself* has changed over the yrs. I grew up (born in 79) believing i was *too large * to be fit for a woman. I was not overweight just what ppl called " broad shouldered , tall "... " Built like a linebacker" (direct quotes said to me basically from birth). And at that time women were to be Kate Moss thin. They weren't meant to be so "large"

    So I equated fit with, smaller. Smaller than I was, for certain.

    I did eventually become obese. And my goal when I started to get healthier was about weight loss, get smaller. That was it. I did. In fact "get smaller" bout 100lbs smaller. But I didn't feel, fit. Until I started lifting heavy. And then I saw muscle gains and I saw all the things I could do with that "larger body". Suddenly I was feeling strong and energetic. I ran a half marathon, I have lifted so much more than I ever thought I could. I look pretty good, too. But not small.

    So the definition of the word for me has kinda changed over the years. That doesn't mean I put that on others, at all. I don't care about how strong or muscular other ppl are. I like all the responses here, actually.

    And I don't think I will need to keep a certain amount of muscle to feel fit forever, either. I think it's more about being free of previous pressures I put on myself to look a certain way. That alone has me mentally fit.

  • ninerbuffninerbuff Member, Greeter Posts: 44,847 Member Member, Greeter Posts: 44,847 Member
    It can be subjective. Sometimes people see fit as people who have great bodies. Or someone who can run a marathon. But those with great bodies may not be able to do a mile run in under 8 minutes, or a marathoner may not be able to bench press 50lbs. So it may be from who you ask.
    One thing is for sure though. It's a usually a physical aspect of something. Whether it be a sport, a physical hobby (like rock climbing), MMA, etc., "fit" will be dependent on how it's viewed in that category.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

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  • JthanmyfitnesspalJthanmyfitnesspal Member, Premium Posts: 2,744 Member Member, Premium Posts: 2,744 Member
    Excellent thread, @WandRsmom and great answers. I always like hearing from @AnnPT77 and @ninerbuff, who have different, but both very interesting, points of view. What is great about the discussion is that, before investing a lot of time and effort in achieving something, you think carefully about what it is you want to achieve. In the area of fitness, that just means that you set some sort of reasonable goal.

    (BTW: Some goals are less useful than others. I have seen several people set the goal of "seeing their abs" because that's what celebrities often look like. Everyone must know that, when your livelihood depends on it, you may take steps that are quite unnecessary, like having lipo, etc.)
  • ninerbuffninerbuff Member, Greeter Posts: 44,847 Member Member, Greeter Posts: 44,847 Member
    Excellent thread, @WandRsmom and great answers. I always like hearing from @AnnPT77 and @ninerbuff, who have different, but both very interesting, points of view. What is great about the discussion is that, before investing a lot of time and effort in achieving something, you think carefully about what it is you want to achieve. In the area of fitness, that just means that you set some sort of reasonable goal.

    (BTW: Some goals are less useful than others. I have seen several people set the goal of "seeing their abs" because that's what celebrities often look like. Everyone must know that, when your livelihood depends on it, you may take steps that are quite unnecessary, like having lipo, etc.)
    There's a guy in our gym who seems to be pretty fit but ALWAYS does this balance ball exercise. First he'll get on a balance ball and stand on it. Then he'll put it on top of a box job (24") and continue till he's on the highest box jump. I have asked him why he does it and response was for core strength. What's the actual application that this can be used for? No idea.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

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