Myfitnesspal

Message Boards Goal: Gaining Weight and Body Building
You are currently viewing the message boards in:

Share your warm up for lifting

Luluetduet8Luluetduet8 Member Posts: 49 Member Member Posts: 49 Member
Hey guys! I’m going to be starting a lifting routine and I’m curious what everyone does to warm up before they start lifting heavy??

Mike matthews says to do four lifts at increasing amounts before lifting “heavy” for that body part, but part of me feels like this isn’t enough and that I should be doing jumping jacks or dynamic stretches.

I would love to hear what you guys do for leg day, back day, chest day, total body, or however you do it! I especially want to hear from people who are great at avoiding injury!
«1

Replies

  • JeffMatchettJeffMatchett Member Posts: 43 Member Member Posts: 43 Member
    Main purpose of the warm up is to get the blood flowing in that particular area. With this in mind full body warmup (like jumping jacks or cardio) is generally useless. It's not targeted well enough.
    Is it your first chest workout of the way? Take 50% weight off your bench or dumbbell press and just do 2 or 3 sets of 15-20 reps before continuing.
    First leg workout of the day? Take 50% weight off your squat and do 2 or 3 sets of 15-20 reps before continuing.
    Etc. I'm sure increasing amounts is fine but seems like overkill.
    Before long you will have an idea of when your muscles are cold or warm and you can cut back or increase your warm up as required.
    edited July 26
  • MaltedTeaMaltedTea Member, Premium Posts: 6,289 Member Member, Premium Posts: 6,289 Member
    Seeing as I workout from home...

    Dancing in front of the mirror for a couple of minutes? 😬 You didn't clarify whether you needed effectiveness as a criteria.

    It just gets me in a lifting (or general exercising) mood if the right DJ mix is going 🤷🏿‍♀️
  • middlehaitchmiddlehaitch Member Posts: 8,369 Member Member Posts: 8,369 Member
    I follow my programme which has ‘warm up’ sets inc.

    When I first started and the weight was easier I thought it a waste, did it anyway. After a few weeks of the weight progressing I really appreciated the warm up sets.

    I had the same feeling about rest periods. To start with too long, now I sometimes have to extend them.

    If I am going in ‘cold’, either temp or an inactive day I will do 5-15 min on the rowing machine just to get things moving.
    If I am going in ‘warm’ either temp or an active day I just get right to my warm up sets.

    Cheers, h.
  • claireychn074claireychn074 Member, Premium Posts: 568 Member Member, Premium Posts: 568 Member
    I do 45 mins conditioning and mobility (I do Olympic lifting so need everything warmed up) before I start lifting. It includes core work (ab roll outs, hanging knee raises) lat work, shoulder mobilisation, lower back work (hyper extensions), I roll my quads with the bar, do body weight squats / lunges, and finally go through the lifts with a broomstick to see if there are any areas of tightness before I touch the bar. Then I’ll do warm ups with the bar specific to my lifts that day (snatch contact, high pulls, front rack) before loading the bar.

    My sessions take a while but at my age (47) I can’t snatch or clean and jerk without all that! 🤷‍♂️🤣
  • davew0000davew0000 Member Posts: 124 Member Member Posts: 124 Member
    I am following Matthew’s program and also felt, as a 41yo, just the lifting warm ups were insufficient. I do 5 mins of targeted CV, e.g. rowing on pull day, and some stretching of the muscles involved before starting my warm up sets.
  • LGreenfield7LGreenfield7 Member Posts: 75 Member Member Posts: 75 Member
    If I am going to squat heavy I start with leg extensions and then do 4 warm up sets with the squat movement with 12,7,3,1 reps, than I start my working sets. I will also return to the leg extensions later on in the workout. As far as deadlifting goes, I do my deadlifts almost last on back day. After all my rowing and pulling movements I do a few heavy sets of deadlift with no actual deadlift warm ups. I normally do heavy T-bar, or bent over rows just before my heavy deadlift sets.
  • steveko89steveko89 Member Posts: 2,117 Member Member Posts: 2,117 Member
    As typical for most things, I like Dr. Mike Isratel's approach and have found it effective put in practice.



    Generally, if I have time I'll do some light stretching, mostly T-spine stuff or some basic yoga flows I've come to know from various iterations of working out.

    For leg day I also incorporate a pre-lifting warm-up routine from Squat University. It really emphasizes hip mobility and I've found it really helps me easily get to good depth. On days I bench I will also do a set of swings with the Kabuki Shoulderok, 8-12 per side.
  • billkansasbillkansas Member Posts: 263 Member Member Posts: 263 Member
    I keep my warmup short and sweet because I can't spare the time. First, I hurry on the way to the gym just to get my heart pumping (change my clothes and hustle around getting ready). If I'm deadlifting my warmup is typically: 135 x 5, 135 x 5, 225 x 5, 275 x 3, 325 x 1, and then my working sets (usually in the 360 range for fives). I'm 52 and pretty much injury free these days. I wear a hoodie for the first few warmup sets too. I'm usually kind of excited to begin... I've been following this type of simple warmup for years for all my primary lifts... works for me.
  • deputy_randolphdeputy_randolph Member Posts: 942 Member Member Posts: 942 Member
    Deadlifts: 2x10 leg press with a little weight/2x10 back extension with a little weight/[email protected] dls/1×[email protected] dls (I modified the 5/3/1 warm-up); I usually stretch hip flexors between warm-up sets

    Bench: 2×10 with the empty bar/ 1x8/1×6/1×4 bench: weights for those sets determined by powerlifting coach

    Shoulders: light external rotation movements for 2x10/2×10 OHP
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Member Posts: 9,010 Member Member Posts: 9,010 Member
    Best advice I can give you on warm up is stay specific to the lift itself. Further away in terms of specificity, the less beneficial.

    So if your squatting reps of 6 a general but excellent warm up for a beginner to a advanced lifter would be something incremented towards your working sets. Here is one I might program for a more novel lifter compared to a more advanced.

    MORE NOVEL
    1. Air squats 6 reps
    2. 35 x 6
    3. 55 x 6
    4. 75 x 6
    5. 90 x 6 ( working set)


    ADVANCED
    1. Air squats 6 rep
    2. 45(empty bb) Xreps/sets needed
    3. 135 x 6
    4. 225 x 6
    5. 315 x 6
    6. 405 x 6
    7. 495 x 6
    8. 525 x 6 (working set)

    Injuries don't come from improper warm up per see, they come from improper load management. Use appropriate intensity with adequate volume and your injury risk is low.



  • Speakeasy76Speakeasy76 Member Posts: 823 Member Member Posts: 823 Member
    Foam rolling for tight spots (which for me is a lot, unfortunately)
    Mobility work for all working muscles
    Some activation work for underactive muscles (TA muscles and small back muscles)
    2-3 warm up sets of main lifts
  • richardgavelrichardgavel Member Posts: 997 Member Member Posts: 997 Member
    Foam rolling for tight spots (which for me is a lot, unfortunately)
    Mobility work for all working muscles
    Some activation work for underactive muscles (TA muscles and small back muscles)
    2-3 warm up sets of main lifts

    I would think the foam rolling would be better after lifts not before. Not that I'm an expert 😜
  • JeffMatchettJeffMatchett Member Posts: 43 Member Member Posts: 43 Member
    Foam rolling for tight spots (which for me is a lot, unfortunately)
    Mobility work for all working muscles
    Some activation work for underactive muscles (TA muscles and small back muscles)
    2-3 warm up sets of main lifts

    I would think the foam rolling would be better after lifts not before. Not that I'm an expert 😜

    Both, but doing before hand can be a great way to loosen up muscles that don't often see a whole lot of action. One great example is lower back before squatting.
  • ninerbuffninerbuff Member, Greeter Posts: 45,642 Member Member, Greeter Posts: 45,642 Member
    davew0000 wrote: »
    I am following Matthew’s program and also felt, as a 41yo, just the lifting warm ups were insufficient. I do 5 mins of targeted CV, e.g. rowing on pull day, and some stretching of the muscles involved before starting my warm up sets.
    Actually science shows that stretching of muscle before heavy lifting hampers your progress.

    https://www.bu.edu/articles/2015/stretch-before-exercise-not-so-fast

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png
  • Speakeasy76Speakeasy76 Member Posts: 823 Member Member Posts: 823 Member
    Foam rolling for tight spots (which for me is a lot, unfortunately)
    Mobility work for all working muscles
    Some activation work for underactive muscles (TA muscles and small back muscles)
    2-3 warm up sets of main lifts

    I would think the foam rolling would be better after lifts not before. Not that I'm an expert 😜

    It depends on what your goal is with it, I guess. My goal is to loosen up tight spots and/or overactive muscles beforehand for better performance. I used to do it afterwards, but have read multiple personal trainer's books or blogs (e.g., Bret Contreras) that mention doing it beforehand.
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Member Posts: 9,010 Member Member Posts: 9,010 Member
    Foam rolling for tight spots (which for me is a lot, unfortunately)
    Mobility work for all working muscles
    Some activation work for underactive muscles (TA muscles and small back muscles)
    2-3 warm up sets of main lifts

    I would think the foam rolling would be better after lifts not before. Not that I'm an expert 😜

    It depends on what your goal is with it, I guess. My goal is to loosen up tight spots and/or overactive muscles beforehand for better performance. I used to do it afterwards, but have read multiple personal trainer's books or blogs (e.g., Bret Contreras) that mention doing it beforehand.
    Foam rolling shows no additional benefit of performance of a lift.

    Foam rolling is basically a self massage that may make you feel good but doesnt improve or benefit compared to proper warm up with specificity. In other words if you're preparing to squat, them warm up squatting.

    If you enjoy foam rolling, no harm. Just no added benefits and takes time that might be considered better allocated.

    I would really take some caution of Contreras' advice and as always do your own research. Some of his evidence is highly misleading.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6543984/

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6543984/
    Unfortunately, the literature on FR that does exist is equivocal and insufficient, which is why the widespread use of FR is to date not fully supported by the available empirical data. In addition, there is currently no meta-analysis that has evaluated the literature and calculated the pooled effects of FR. This creates a gap in the translation from research to practice for strength and conditioning coaches who use FR tools and recommend these products to their athletes (Cheatham et al., 2015).
    edited August 3
  • sgt1372sgt1372 Member Posts: 3,925 Member Member Posts: 3,925 Member
    All that I've ever done to "warm up" before doing a lift is a few reps w/an empty or lightly weighted bar before attempting heavier lifts to make sure that I know that I can do the full range of motion w/o any discomfort or other apparent problem.
  • Speakeasy76Speakeasy76 Member Posts: 823 Member Member Posts: 823 Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    Foam rolling for tight spots (which for me is a lot, unfortunately)
    Mobility work for all working muscles
    Some activation work for underactive muscles (TA muscles and small back muscles)
    2-3 warm up sets of main lifts

    I would think the foam rolling would be better after lifts not before. Not that I'm an expert 😜

    It depends on what your goal is with it, I guess. My goal is to loosen up tight spots and/or overactive muscles beforehand for better performance. I used to do it afterwards, but have read multiple personal trainer's books or blogs (e.g., Bret Contreras) that mention doing it beforehand.
    Foam rolling shows no additional benefit of performance of a lift.

    Foam rolling is basically a self massage that may make you feel good but doesnt improve or benefit compared to proper warm up with specificity. In other words if you're preparing to squat, them warm up squatting.

    If you enjoy foam rolling, no harm. Just no added benefits and takes time that might be considered better allocated.

    I would really take some caution of Contreras' advice and as always do your own research. Some of his evidence is highly misleading.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6543984/

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6543984/
    Unfortunately, the literature on FR that does exist is equivocal and insufficient, which is why the widespread use of FR is to date not fully supported by the available empirical data. In addition, there is currently no meta-analysis that has evaluated the literature and calculated the pooled effects of FR. This creates a gap in the translation from research to practice for strength and conditioning coaches who use FR tools and recommend these products to their athletes (Cheatham et al., 2015).

    Thanks for the info. It seems both articles you posted are the same, but I did find the one that is the meta-analysis of other FR studies. It seems that at best, there just isn't enough evidence to say it's effective, at least for the regular exerciser, but possibly for specific sports athletes. I'm wondering, though, what types of FR was done and for what populations.

    I follow Cori Lefkowith of Redefining Strength, primarily for her prehab/rehab stuff for injury prevention and rehab (not for the workouts themselves). She is a big advocate of FR in combination with mobility work, but not just doing it to do it, but for specific purposes like overworked/tight muscles and injury prevention. She also has several videos on HOW to do it for specific purposes, and adds into other prehab routines. I should add that I also include warm up sets of my big movements for the workout and mobility/activation work. It definitely doesn't feel relaxing at the time, and when I do it is more like the deep pressure massage that can actually be kind of painful!

    I personally have a long history of overworked muscles/tight spots--usually the same ones--and not just from workouts. In fact, I'm much more conscious of using the correct muscles during workouts, but it's my everyday posture that I've had for YEARS that I"m working to correct and has caused issues, as well as my generally body type/resting muscle tone. As a generally anxious person, I have a big tendency to hold my stress in my neck and shoulders, which has created a lot of knots, which I think impacts my workouts. I know that FR is kind of a bandaid and I have to work on the root of the problem, but I do feel it helps, at least temporarily. It may just be psychological, but I guess I could experiment by not doing the FR beforehand and seeing what happens.
  • ritzvinritzvin Member, Premium Posts: 2,806 Member Member, Premium Posts: 2,806 Member
    I just do warmup sets, starting with empty bar and incrementing up to working weight.
  • ritzvinritzvin Member, Premium Posts: 2,806 Member Member, Premium Posts: 2,806 Member
    (I stretch afterward when my muscles are warmed up from the lifting).
Sign In or Register to comment.