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For my personal training how often should I go the gym

Hey everybody, My name is Mike, my first time to time post here. I love the content. I have a desk job that can make me not move for hours at a time. I am losing weight and my appetite is really low I've been getting into fitness and I was thinking that personal training could be the answer. I was wondering if any of you guys have experience on how often should I go to the gym for my personal training or maybe dietary suggestions? It would be great to hear from any of you. Thank you so much


Mike

Replies

  • SnifterPug
    SnifterPug Posts: 744 Member
    Do you mean personal training as in hiring a trainer? Most people would see a trainer at least once a week and would then get advice on how many other sessions to do during the rest of the week.
  • sijomial
    sijomial Posts: 19,074 Member
    It's not really how many times you go - it's more getting the appropriate volume over the course of a week (or more....). That volume also has to take into account your current fitness level and goals both short and long term.
    You can cut the exercise cake many different ways. You will find many very high volume exercisers here that train every day or almost every day but that's more than likely completely unsuitable for you right now.

    For an example of fitting it in when I had a desk job I cut a deal with my boss to take alternating long and short lunch breaks so I could get to the gym at the office some days and then supplemented around that with late evening sessions in my local gym and did my long bike rides at the weekend.

    Maybe start from how many times can you get to the gym or what frequency fits into your lifestyle best?

    And then factor in what you are actually planning to do at the gym - just weights, just cardio, a mixture?
    Do you need the PT to be there for all the sessions or just to get you started and review periodically?

    Sorry there's so many questions but there isn't a simple answer.
  • ritzvin
    ritzvin Posts: 2,829 Member
    LoverMike wrote: »
    Hey everybody, My name is Mike, my first time to time post here. I love the content. I have a desk job that can make me not move for hours at a time. I am losing weight and my appetite is really low I've been getting into fitness and I was thinking that personal training could be the answer. I was wondering if any of you guys have experience on how often should I go to the gym for my personal training or maybe dietary suggestions? It would be great to hear from any of you. Thank you so much


    Mike

    If looking to start weight training, then typically the most recommended is 3x/week beginner basic full body program (as in you hit each major group once every session and have 1-2 rest days between sessions).

    For cardio, I'd suggest trying out different sports/hobbies/activities, and see which you like most and join groups/clubs/.. for those (which'll sort of set the schedule on that). Sites like meetup.com are one option for finding groups to do things like riding/walking/hiking/.... with and connecting with other groups.
  • LoverMike
    LoverMike Posts: 2 Member
    Thank you all so much for your information on personal training. I'm definitely excited to explore all these options more in-depth. I ran across an article talking about personal training here https://traineracademy.org/training/nasm-study-guide. They mentioned about (NASM) Certified Personal Trainer. Do you guys think when getting a personal trainer I should ask if he is certified? I'd love to hear your input on that
  • nossmf
    nossmf Posts: 2,125 Member
    You absolutely should ask a trainer about their certifications (there are several possible). I cannot testify which are better than others, but part of the question is to gauge the professionalism of the trainer. They need to be able to answer your question and provide proof, have references available, everything you would ask of a potential hire, because that's effectively what you are about to become: a boss for a company of one, with a single employee: the personal trainer. You want that employee to be capable, intelligent, professional, able to get along with you, etc.
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 39,885 Member
    LoverMike wrote: »
    Thank you all so much for your information on personal training. I'm definitely excited to explore all these options more in-depth. I ran across an article talking about personal training here https://traineracademy.org/training/nasm-study-guide. They mentioned about (NASM) Certified Personal Trainer. Do you guys think when getting a personal trainer I should ask if he is certified? I'd love to hear your input on that

    At minimum a trainer should have a basic certification. My trainer has numerous certifications as well as a degree is exercise physiology and a masters in nutrition. He and his wife own their own personal training gym. From experience, I'm a bit leery about PTs who are employees of large commercial gyms. Not that there aren't good ones, but in my experience most of them tend to be pretty new to the industry. I've had a few trainers over the years until I met my current one about 6 years ago and I never really had a good experience with a gym employee trainer. I had one that was working in a commercial gym, but he was his own business and just renting space at the gym and he was very good.

    PTs are expensive, so unless you're loaded once per week with a PT and then homework is pretty common.
  • mjglantz
    mjglantz Posts: 408 Member
    I work out with a personal trainer once/week and replicate that workout (sort of) one more time. If you're asking about exercise I do something EVERY day getting on average 20,000 steps/day. Mix walking with cardio machines at the gym, yoga, stretching. As for diet, I pretty much follow Michael Pollan's advice to eat "real foods, less of it, more plants." Track every day and pretty much stay within my calorie goal.
  • Chieflrg
    Chieflrg Posts: 9,082 Member
    edited October 15
    nossmf wrote: »
    You absolutely should ask a trainer about their certifications (there are several possible). I cannot testify which are better than others, but part of the question is to gauge the professionalism of the trainer. They need to be able to answer your question and provide proof, have references available, everything you would ask of a potential hire, because that's effectively what you are about to become: a boss for a company of one, with a single employee: the personal trainer. You want that employee to be capable, intelligent, professional, able to get along with you, etc.

    No. Unfortunately this is a common misconception.

    A certification is only to get you a job at a commercial gym and nothing else. It's really easy and cheap to get and the information needed to obtain one. The information needed does not follow current evidence and is obsolete and literally garbage. The majority of all commercial trainers really don't have a clue about putting together a program tailored to someone's goals. Their tactics/methods is to tire a person to the point that a client thinks "they must of done really good" without any using proper load management which is key to lower injury risk.

    I would certainly ask a trainer for references of their methods working specific to your goal. The commercial gyms management doesn't necessarily want results as much as someone buying a membership and paying for a trainer they provide and benefit from.
  • Chieflrg
    Chieflrg Posts: 9,082 Member
    edited October 15
    LoverMike wrote: »
    Thank you all so much for your information on personal training. I'm definitely excited to explore all these options more in-depth. I ran across an article talking about personal training here https://traineracademy.org/training/nasm-study-guide. They mentioned about (NASM) Certified Personal Trainer. Do you guys think when getting a personal trainer I should ask if he is certified? I'd love to hear your input on that

    Hi Mike. I wouldn't bother asking if they are certified. If you are going to a commercial gym, the gym requires whatever certification level to hire you. They will be certified regardless. Though it really doesn't matter. One really isn't substantially better than the other and the info to obtain a certification is garbage.

    I would ask for references in relation to your goal(s) both short term and long term and what method they utilize proper load management. If they can' t provide that, they more than likely won't do you the service you are willing to pay for.

    I can't stress this enough. A good trainer comes from experience in the gym, not a book. They also follow current and established evidence. Get references of actual results is very reasonable. I'm not speaking of results in the first few months of training of a individual, that anybody can do even by themselves. I'm speaking of long term results of their clients.

    I'm glad you decided to reap the benefits of resistance training and don't be afraid to keep asking questions.

    -Lanny






  • Xellercin
    Xellercin Posts: 175 Member
    First, it's best to be clear on what your goals are.

    What are you looking to accomplish?
    What are you looking for from a personal trainer in terms of helping you accomplish those goals?

    A lot of people just throw everything and the kitchen sink at a new "health" routine, without having any clear goals or strategy in mind for what they actually want to accomplish. So figure that out first, and then deploy your energy and resources towards a plan that makes the most sense for you.

    So, what are you trying to achieve?
  • Theoldguy1
    Theoldguy1 Posts: 2,178 Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    LoverMike wrote: »
    Thank you all so much for your information on personal training. I'm definitely excited to explore all these options more in-depth. I ran across an article talking about personal training here https://traineracademy.org/training/nasm-study-guide. They mentioned about (NASM) Certified Personal Trainer. Do you guys think when getting a personal trainer I should ask if he is certified? I'd love to hear your input on that

    Hi Mike. I wouldn't bother asking if they are certified. If you are going to a commercial gym, the gym requires whatever certification level to hire you. They will be certified regardless. Though it really doesn't matter. One really isn't substantially better than the other and the info to obtain a certification is garbage.

    I would ask for references in relation to your goal(s) both short term and long term and what method they utilize proper load management. If they can' t provide that, they more than likely won't do you the service you are willing to pay for.

    I can't stress this enough. A good trainer comes from experience in the gym, not a book. They also follow current and established evidence. Get references of actual results is very reasonable. I'm not speaking of results in the first few months of training of a individual, that anybody can do even by themselves. I'm speaking of long term results of their clients.

    I'm glad you decided to reap the benefits of resistance training and don't be afraid to keep asking questions.

    -Lanny






    From your earlier posts I realize you don't think much of certifications but in my area to be a personal trainer at a gym with the initials "PF" you need "an interest in fitness and a smile" to be a personal trainer, no certification required.
  • Chieflrg
    Chieflrg Posts: 9,082 Member
    edited November 3
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    LoverMike wrote: »
    Thank you all so much for your information on personal training. I'm definitely excited to explore all these options more in-depth. I ran across an article talking about personal training here https://traineracademy.org/training/nasm-study-guide. They mentioned about (NASM) Certified Personal Trainer. Do you guys think when getting a personal trainer I should ask if he is certified? I'd love to hear your input on that

    Hi Mike. I wouldn't bother asking if they are certified. If you are going to a commercial gym, the gym requires whatever certification level to hire you. They will be certified regardless. Though it really doesn't matter. One really isn't substantially better than the other and the info to obtain a certification is garbage.

    I would ask for references in relation to your goal(s) both short term and long term and what method they utilize proper load management. If they can' t provide that, they more than likely won't do you the service you are willing to pay for.

    I can't stress this enough. A good trainer comes from experience in the gym, not a book. They also follow current and established evidence. Get references of actual results is very reasonable. I'm not speaking of results in the first few months of training of a individual, that anybody can do even by themselves. I'm speaking of long term results of their clients.

    I'm glad you decided to reap the benefits of resistance training and don't be afraid to keep asking questions.

    -Lanny






    From your earlier posts I realize you don't think much of certifications but in my area to be a personal trainer at a gym with the initials "PF" you need "an interest in fitness and a smile" to be a personal trainer, no certification required.

    Yes I hear your words. I'm speaking of the Cert's value specifically which I believe you understand my stance. The ability to get a job at most commercial gyms is the main reason to acquire a cert. There is some random value which is also very specific such as one that allows you to be on a list to train pro golfers and make a handsome paycheck, this has value for those who want to make suitcases of money.

    There certainly are good trainer with and without a cert. I put dollars to donuts that 99% of the successful ones became so because of experience, not the cert. No shame in making money, but personally I have a problem with the fitness industry mostly as it is marketing and not results long term.

    The great thing about PF as a whole it does get people off the couch in some way. Also any stimulus dosed to someone who is untrained will elicit a strength and hypertrophy response. So even a "trainer" who is not experienced can have success for a short period of time in these conditions with nearly any made up or standard programming. The problem lies when the untrained individual no longer responds and needs more.

    I hope I didn't spew a rant here. I just really am geeked about the benefit's of training.