new challenge 10 pull ups

I am certain this doesn't sound like a challenge to most of you. However, at the moment, I cannot even do one. Any tips on how to get started ?

Replies

  • Theoldguy1
    Theoldguy1 Posts: 2,270 Member
    To be honest, pretty sure most people in the general population can't do one pull up.

    Per the article linked:

    https://physicalliving.com/how-many-pull-ups-should-i-be-able-to-do/

    "If you want to be a United States Marine, you have to perform at least 3 pull-ups (i.e. males only, for now). That’s a minimum passing grade. If you want to be a U.S. Army Ranger, you have to perform at least 6 pull-ups (12+ is recommended). And if you want to be a Navy SEAL, you have to perform a minimum of 8 reps to get into BUD/S training, but 15-20+ reps is recommended, and necessary if you want to be competitive among your class mates."

    Given the standards for the military it wouldn't be surprising if the typical person couldn't do any.

    I like the information Jeff Cavaliere a trainer and physical therapist puts out. This is his introductory instructional video. He also has several other videos on pull ups.



    Good luck.
  • SnifterPug
    SnifterPug Posts: 746 Member
    I can't do one either. But I'm working towards it. The actual pull up exercises I do are assisted with bands and I am gradually reducing the levels of assistance or increasing volume depending on my current training block. Otherwise exercises to strengthen back and arms will carry over well to the pull up. If you are carrying excess body weight, losing it will help.
  • xrj22
    xrj22 Posts: 133 Member
    Theoldguy1: Thanks!! that video is very helpful. I had not been acquainted with Athlean X. I went to their youtube channel and found several other interesting videos too.
  • Theoldguy1
    Theoldguy1 Posts: 2,270 Member
    xrj22 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1: Thanks!! that video is very helpful. I had not been acquainted with Athlean X. I went to their youtube channel and found several other interesting videos too.

    Jeff Cavaliere is literally one of the best on YouTube. Physical Therapist, Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist worked in those capacities in Major League Baseball.

    Individuals will vary but IMO the advice he gives is directionally correct.
  • sgt1372
    sgt1372 Posts: 3,969 Member
    edited June 2021
    I use to be able to do 20-25 "full pullups" but elbow deterioration has reduced that to zero. I can still do them but, if I do, it will cause severe pain in my right elbow. So, I don't do them anymore.

    I believe that overhead presses, Arnold dumb bell presses, overhead dumbbell presses, lying dumb bell pullovers, push ups (full plank touching chest at the bottom arms fully extended at the top - both flat on the ground head higher than feet and decline w/feet higher than head) and rope climbs (that were all a part of my workout routine at one time or the other) were also helpful to me in developing the arm/shoulder strength necessary to do full pull ups.

    It also helps to LOSE WEIGHT to do pull ups, since the less weight you have to pull up, the easier it should be to do them.

    BTW, it's not a TRUE pull up unless your arms are FULLY EXTENDED at the bottom of the movement and you are not "kipping" to get back up; anything else is cheating IMO.

  • TX_375
    TX_375 Posts: 15 Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    To be honest, pretty sure most people in the general population can't do one pull up.

    Per the article linked:

    https://physicalliving.com/how-many-pull-ups-should-i-be-able-to-do/

    "If you want to be a United States Marine, you have to perform at least 3 pull-ups (i.e. males only, for now). That’s a minimum passing grade. If you want to be a U.S. Army Ranger, you have to perform at least 6 pull-ups (12+ is recommended). And if you want to be a Navy SEAL, you have to perform a minimum of 8 reps to get into BUD/S training, but 15-20+ reps is recommended, and necessary if you want to be competitive among your class mates."

    Given the standards for the military it wouldn't be surprising if the typical person couldn't do any.

    I like the information Jeff Cavaliere a trainer and physical therapist puts out. This is his introductory instructional video. He also has several other videos on pull ups.



    Good luck.

    I was an instructor at the Ranger Training Detachment. Failing to do 6 proper pull ups was responsible for many (if not a slim majority) of Day 1 drops. I'm certain the average high school or college kid can't do one.
  • MikePfirrman
    MikePfirrman Posts: 3,105 Member
    10 is quite a few. There are straps and bands you can use that make assisted ones more reasonable.

    Like others, I'm old now and can still do some, but usually don't. I use a band as assistance. But like anything else, you build up on pullups. I'd go to the gym or get a pullup bar and work on assisted ones first until you can do sets of 10. I do that often and, even at 57, that extra bit of help makes it easier on my shoulders. I'd bet that the assistance band I have is like around 15 lbs, but that makes a huge difference.

    It's still the same muscles and you're building up while you're doing them. The device I have (I use it on my Power Tower) is a foot hold with a strap at the top (band assisted). I think I paid like $20 for it on Amazon.

  • swimmom_1
    swimmom_1 Posts: 840 Member
    @MikePfirrman
    Hmmm? Do you know what your band assist strap is called? My son has a pullup bar in a doorway and I can't do one yet. I've dropped 97 lbs and I would love some assistance to work up till I can get stronger and lose the last 30+ lbs to do legit ones. My boys were competitive swimmers and could always do 10-20, at least. It was part of their "dry land" training. When I was in the 120's about 6 years ago I could do a couple.
  • swimmom_1
    swimmom_1 Posts: 840 Member
    @Theoldguy1
    Just watched the video by Jeff Cavaliere, 22 days to a pullup. Its great logic. Unfortunately I work long days, 4/week and I don't see how I could do his plan. But I love it.
  • MikePfirrman
    MikePfirrman Posts: 3,105 Member
    edited January 30
    swimmom_1 wrote: »
    @MikePfirrman
    Hmmm? Do you know what your band assist strap is called? My son has a pullup bar in a doorway and I can't do one yet. I've dropped 97 lbs and I would love some assistance to work up till I can get stronger and lose the last 30+ lbs to do legit ones. My boys were competitive swimmers and could always do 10-20, at least. It was part of their "dry land" training. When I was in the 120's about 6 years ago I could do a couple.

    I looked it up. It's called Intent Sports Pullup Assist Bands. I love it. You adjust the footstrap to your height and then stick your foot in it and it adds around 15 to 20 lbs of assistance. If you want a cheaper one, most people just get a very thick resistance band and tie it at the top and step up onto it. I wanted something a bit safer and more stable and this has worked out great.

    Yeah, those were the days when I could do like 20 of them! Ahh, youth is great!

    During my initial weight loss period, I thought I could still rip off pullups and tore my rotator cuff! That was like 6 months of rehab! I don't even try to do them any longer without at least 10 to 15 lbs of assistance.
  • ecjim
    ecjim Posts: 959 Member
    I didn't watch the video , I don't know if this was mentioned, but stand on a stool at the top position , then lower yourself slowly , repeat until you can pull up
  • golfchess6
    golfchess6 Posts: 64 Member
    I agree that using bands to assist you is probably the best way to achieve a full pullup. If you did find the bands, make sure that it is a clean pull up and that you are not swinging. If you are unable to find bands, I would start by just hanging from the bar. If you don't mind spending a couple of extra dollars, I would get a pullup bar that has different positions. Soon, we will see you doing Archer and Typewriter pullups with ease. Please note that I am not a personal trainer and this is just my own observations.
  • briscogun
    briscogun Posts: 1,077 Member
    edited February 10
    ecjim wrote: »
    I didn't watch the video , I don't know if this was mentioned, but stand on a stool at the top position , then lower yourself slowly , repeat until you can pull up

    Yep, this is how I do it when I'm getting back into it (right now actually).

    I used to be able to knock out 10-12 pretty reliably, but I've been away for a while and can't do even one right now. So for the past few weeks I'm doing the negative aspect; get into the top of the pullup position (I stand on my bench) and then sloooowly lower myself over a 5 second count. Your body actually gets the same workout doing a slow negative as an actual pull UP. You'll feel it.

    I'm doing that 3 times a week right now, and in a week or two ill try to do one again. Usually I get to the point where I can knock out 2-3, then I'll finish my set doing the negatives again, and keep doing that until I can do more and more regular and have to do less and less negatives.

    Good luck!
  • sarah7591
    sarah7591 Posts: 249 Member
    Use the sports band pull up bars. You start with a thick one and then reduce to a thin one. This works for me I have been doing them for years. Really builds upper body strength.