Units of liquids

Is there a way to specify quantities in PINTS, I see quarts, cups and ml but in England we usually use pints. Don’t tell me to convert it, I really can’t be bothered.

Replies

  • Elphaba1313
    Elphaba1313 Posts: 149 Member
    grams are better than using cups etc anyway, if you can?
  • Courtscan2
    Courtscan2 Posts: 431 Member
    Create your own entries if you have the raw nutritional data on hand. Although, realistically, googling the conversion rate will be significantly faster, so if you can't be bothered to google the conversion rate, I doubt you'll be creating entries.
    Also, I lived in England for 10 years and all of my measuring cups were in mls and cups, so time to buy new ones, perhaps.
  • KL1887
    KL1887 Posts: 68 Member
    I’m in the uk and I don’t use pints at all. However, there’s no set way to specify pints on here. A lazy way is to say 550ml is a pint however the more accurate is 568ml, when you’re really honing in on the specifics of calories.
    If you really, really can’t be bothered to convert it or find a way around it. Just stop using the product that only comes in pints and comes in a format that is identified as a measurement on here
  • Redordeadhead
    Redordeadhead Posts: 1,192 Member
    grams are better than using cups etc anyway, if you can?

    Not necessary for liquids like drinks, but for food, yes.
  • Redordeadhead
    Redordeadhead Posts: 1,192 Member
    Apart from beer and milk, in my experience in the UK most things are in ml, and even those in pints likely have the ml amount on the label too.

    If you're thinking about something like a beer served in a pub, you can add the word "pint" when you search and many options come up. Perhaps this works for milk too, I'm not sure.
  • sijomial
    sijomial Posts: 19,750 Member
    I'm English too and agree with the above poster.
    Draught beer in pubs (which you can search for - try London Pride as an example) and milk in two or four pint containers are just about the only things that spring to mind that still use pints.

    Soft drinks, bottled beer etc. are in metric sizes. All liquid labelling will include ml/cc.

    I don't think there is really a problem you need to fix, just be a bit more flexible in using a mix of metric and imperial measures. Just like we haven't bought fuel in gallons for many years.

  • BarbaraHelen2013
    BarbaraHelen2013 Posts: 1,876 Member
    Again, English here too, and other than pub measures I can’t think of a single thing that’s still sold in pints. I guess if you still get a doorstep milk delivery in glass bottles that might still be a pint of milk but I’d be surprised. More likely it’s 500ml these days.

    I think it’s maybe time to embrace the metric system and drag yourself into the 21st century! Once you get used to it, it really is easier.
  • springlering62
    springlering62 Posts: 5,265 Member
    Freddie, I don’t mean this in a mean way. But, based on this and your other post, it’s like you’re expressly looking for a way to fail.

    Are you doing this for yourself, or because a partner or doctor has put their foot down?

    You can either approach this whole process with a sense of curiosity and “hey, I can do this even if it takes a little work and educating myself”, or you can look for every possible avenue to fail, so you can tell yourself and/or that other person “See? I told you so.”

    There are many thousands of people who have used this site successfully.

    I myself have totally relearned to cook using metric. Being from the US, that’s pretty much unheard of. I bet I had two days of metric study in elementary school, and then it was brushed aside as “well you’ll never use it because our way is the best way”. Hey we’re Americans, and the “American Way” is what we do best.

    I’ve taught myself to understand metric, appreciate that I get better and more consistent cooking results, and it’s certainly much easier for logging purposes.

    Unlike my SIL, I don’t have a doctorate in arcane mathematical theory. I’m just a retired insurance agent, not a mathematical unicorn. If I can do this, you can, too, but you have to really want to be successful and become invested in becoming the best- or at least, better- you that you want to be.

    If you want it.

    Stop throwing up silly mental roadblocks. We are here to help, but if you really truly want it.

    Btw are you logging those pub pints?😉

  • goal06082021
    goal06082021 Posts: 2,130 Member
    A pint is half a quart or two cups. What's hard about that?
  • Lietchi
    Lietchi Posts: 4,256 Member
    A pint is half a quart or two cups. What's hard about that?

    Beware, beware, US and UK (imperial) pints are not the same :smile:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pint
  • Redordeadhead
    Redordeadhead Posts: 1,192 Member
    Lietchi wrote: »
    A pint is half a quart or two cups. What's hard about that?

    Beware, beware, US and UK (imperial) pints are not the same :smile:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pint

    True, and on top of that I'm sure many on this side of the world (including me) have no idea what a "quart" or a "cup" is!
  • BarbaraHelen2013
    BarbaraHelen2013 Posts: 1,876 Member
    Lietchi wrote: »
    A pint is half a quart or two cups. What's hard about that?

    Beware, beware, US and UK (imperial) pints are not the same :smile:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pint

    True, and on top of that I'm sure many on this side of the world (including me) have no idea what a "quart" or a "cup" is!

    A quart (short for ‘quarter of a gallon’) is two (U.K. imperial) pints, which is 40 fl oz. It was actually taught here in schools back when I was a kid - but that’s a long time ago!

    A cup…well, I know what one is and what it allegedly equals in fl oz but you can look up any number of conversion tables for all manner of dry goods and come up with endless variations of what weight a cup equals…crazy system!
  • KNoceros
    KNoceros Posts: 319 Member
    Lietchi wrote: »

    Beware, beware, US and UK (imperial) pints are not the same :smile:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pint

    You beat me to it. This is what I came here to say.
    A US pint is 16 fl oz and a UK one is 20.
    Ml would be a better (less ambiguous) measure.
  • sijomial
    sijomial Posts: 19,750 Member
    KNoceros wrote: »
    Lietchi wrote: »

    Beware, beware, US and UK (imperial) pints are not the same :smile:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pint

    You beat me to it. This is what I came here to say.
    A US pint is 16 fl oz and a UK one is 20.
    Ml would be a better (less ambiguous) measure.

    And once you have done the conversion that entry is in a person's food diary under either favourites or recently used tabs.

    That's a one time investment of literally seconds of effort Freddy!
    Small beer you could say. :smiley::wink:
  • lynn_glenmont
    lynn_glenmont Posts: 9,456 Member
    Lietchi wrote: »
    A pint is half a quart or two cups. What's hard about that?

    Beware, beware, US and UK (imperial) pints are not the same :smile:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pint

    True, and on top of that I'm sure many on this side of the world (including me) have no idea what a "quart" or a "cup" is!

    A quart (short for ‘quarter of a gallon’) is two (U.K. imperial) pints, which is 40 fl oz. It was actually taught here in schools back when I was a kid - but that’s a long time ago!

    A cup…well, I know what one is and what it allegedly equals in fl oz but you can look up any number of conversion tables for all manner of dry goods and come up with endless variations of what weight a cup equals…crazy system!

    If an MFP database entry is from U.S. packaging or the USDA nutritional database, a quart is two U.S. pints, which is 32 fluid oz., or about 946 ml.

    A cup is a volume measurement, so it's not at all crazy that equal volumes of different substances weigh different amounts.
  • BarbaraHelen2013
    BarbaraHelen2013 Posts: 1,876 Member
    Lietchi wrote: »
    A pint is half a quart or two cups. What's hard about that?

    Beware, beware, US and UK (imperial) pints are not the same :smile:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pint

    True, and on top of that I'm sure many on this side of the world (including me) have no idea what a "quart" or a "cup" is!

    A quart (short for ‘quarter of a gallon’) is two (U.K. imperial) pints, which is 40 fl oz. It was actually taught here in schools back when I was a kid - but that’s a long time ago!

    A cup…well, I know what one is and what it allegedly equals in fl oz but you can look up any number of conversion tables for all manner of dry goods and come up with endless variations of what weight a cup equals…crazy system!

    If an MFP database entry is from U.S. packaging or the USDA nutritional database, a quart is two U.S. pints, which is 32 fluid oz., or about 946 ml.

    A cup is a volume measurement, so it's not at all crazy that equal volumes of different substances weigh different amounts.

    Obviously, different substances when measured by ‘cup’ weigh different amounts…but that’s not what I was commenting on.

    If I look up conversion charts etc the apparent weight of a ‘cup’ of flour ranges from 115g to 150g depending on whose chart I’m looking at.

    Likewise, a ‘cup’ of chickpea flour ranges between 92g and as much as 142g according to these various charts.

    Very hard to be accurate when none of the conversions are consistent, which was my point. I’m obviously going to get very different results depending on which conversion chart I use. 🤷‍♀️
  • Redordeadhead
    Redordeadhead Posts: 1,192 Member
    @frontline_freddy How are you getting on?