Welcome to Debate Club! Please be aware that this is a space for respectful debate, and that your ideas will be challenged here. Please remember to critique the argument, not the author.

What would you/did you wear in isolation?

paperpudding
paperpudding Posts: 7,995 Member
or how much is it worth getting dressed at all and if so, in what?

Here in Australia, and I presume other countries, if one gets Covid one has to home isolate.
Currently 7 days where I live.

I am on day 4.

am fully vaccinated so symptoms only mild - but no matter, not allowed out till Wed midnight.

I find wearing pyjamas all day encourages 'sick and lazy mode' - and I am still going outside and publicly visible- say,to do gardening in my front yard or get mail from the letter box or put the bins out.

My answer is comfy trackpants, jeans, hoodies, that sort of thing (is winter here) - but I havent worn a pair of shoes since last Wed, been fluffy slippers all the time.

Debate question: do what clothes you wear or dont wear matter to your well being or anything else if nobody else is seeing them (or only your partner and family you live with)
«1

Replies

  • Xellercin
    Xellercin Posts: 925 Member
    To me, they don't matter at all. I wore scrubs for years and was hyper productive. Scrubs are like pyjamas, just worse.

    Now that I'm retired, I have a "uniform" that I wear 99% of the time: merino wool leggings, merino wool t-shirt, merino wool zippy sweater, running shoes.

    Being comfortable makes me more productive, uncomfortable clothes are distracting. Merino wool helps regulate my body temperature. I've worn my "uniform" to lead major corporate meetings where everyone else was in suits and ties.

    So no. I don't think what I wear matters beyond it being optimally functional and comfortable for me.

    I guess if your normal is to wear business attire and you only wear comfortable clothes when not being productive, then wearing comfortable clothes could make you feel less productive.

    But for me, stuffy clothes, even jeans, are reserved for socializing. So it's the opposite. Comfortable, functional clothes are my "get s#&t done" uniform, and nice, proper grown-up clothes are my "dress up for a night out" attire.

    I dress up very, very, very rarely though because I find wearing anything other than running shoes to be intensely annoying.

    Note: I used to be BIG into fashion and didn't own running shoes. Becoming an ultra, ultra productive professional is what cured me of caring about clothes.
  • Lietchi
    Lietchi Posts: 4,873 Member
    At the start of lockdown, I went full 'slob': pajamas, unkempt hair...while working from home. (I rarely, if ever, put on my camera for work meetings - putting on my camera was always planned in advance and I would prepare specifically). Honestly, not the best for getting in the right mood for work, probably. But very time efficient. Nowadays, since changing jobs, I have to put on my webcam for meetings even when working from home, so I do get dressed (usually tops I've worn at the office the week before, just to save on laundry, they can see but not smell me :mrgreen: paired with comfy stretch pants). I resent the time lost 'putting on my face' and having presentable hair, but I do feel slightly more like I'm at work when doing so.

    When I don't have to work, still full 'slob' mode for me. But you wouldn't catch me dead outside the house looking like that, I won't even open the door for packages. It just de-stresses me to not have to make myself presentable, and that's what I need mentally to unwind after a work week. That's why I also prefer to focus my social obligations: meeting friends after a day at the office, or combining a shopping spree and dinner with family the same day, to have at least one day a week when I can just relax at home (whether I'm having a lazy day or being more productive).

    Even on pajama days, I will wear workout clothes and shoes to exercise in my home gym though. I have done an occasional exercise session in pajamas, when I really had low energy and changing clothes was too much of a hurdle mentally, but I felt quite 'icky' and lazy doing that, so I avoid it.

    Since losing weight, I actually quite like 'dressing up' (up to a certain point) and I usually make a bit more of an effort when going to the office now than pre-covid, since it's only 2 days a week. I usually feel more productive those days, but that's probably more to do with having people around me, rather than how I'm dressed.
  • Mouse_Potato
    Mouse_Potato Posts: 1,462 Member
    I do not like wearing pajamas all day. It makes me feel like I never got out of bed. I will only do that if I am sick, and I mean *very* sick! My go-to outfit, given the choice, is a pair of joggers/shorts, a tank top, and a sports bra (we don't get a lot of winter here). This is how I dress when I work from home, which is when I am the most productive. I don't think it's the clothing, but rather the *lack* of people around me. :lol: I am a technology professional and I need quiet to focus. Also, after 25 years of being on-call, I'm pretty used to getting up in the middle of the night to work, so my clothing has never had much influence on how productive I am.

    I do like to dress up a bit when I go out, but I don't go out much.
  • The_Enginerd
    The_Enginerd Posts: 3,974 Member
    At the start of the pandemic when we started working from home almost exclusively, my partner was living across the country and it was just me and my pets at home. Our computers did not have webcams so no video calls. No one saw me unless I went to the store or out for a run. I still got up every morning, took a shower, and changed into casual clothes (jeans and a t-shirt) each day before starting work. I would normally wear khakis and a button up shirt at the office. I needed some routine and sense of normalcy and boundary between work and home. Wearing pajamas all day is a road too far for me.

    We are currently hybrid and my partner now lives with me again. I still follow that same routine on my work from home days.
  • ythannah
    ythannah Posts: 4,299 Member
    I never worked from home during the pandemic but those of us remaining in the office were permitted to "dress casual", which is usually reserved for Fridays. That means we were permitted to wear jeans, T shirts, hoodies and runners -- normally forbidden. I'm happiest in jeans so that's what I wore, with the exception of the 3 ish months when my appendix blew up and the post-surgical period when I was mostly in leggings or yoga pants.

    I know what you mean about "sick and lazy mode" though. Even with a burst appendix I still hauled my *kitten* into the shower every day and got dressed in something other than PJs. I've never worn PJs other than to actually sleep in.

    At home evenings/weekends/vacation I'm either in jeans or some variety of workout pants. I have dogs and they can be dangerous to good work clothes. I also have a home gym so I like the freedom to knock out some reps if I'm downstairs for some other reason.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 26,929 Member
    I don't find that what I wear affects my mood or "mode", except that dressing in nicer clothes can be a distraction during certain home chores - if I'm doing something messy, I'm more efficient if I'm not worried about getting dirt or paint or whatever on my better clothes, so kind of ratty ones are better.

    I'm retired, live alone, and in the pandemic have gone very much to a uniform at home, most of the time: Plain white cotton t-shirt, leggings or sweatpants (I put drawstrings in fat Ann's leggings to hold them up, and wear them as loose house-wear yoga-pant-like things now), sweatshirt if it's cooler weather (I keep the thermostat relatively low in Winter by preference). Because I'm craftsy, many of these have paint or something on them, and I don't care. While I change these up to stay reasonably clean, I do sleep in them, too, as long as they're reasonably clean. I don't leave my yard/lot dressed like this, but will go out to get mail or do minor non-messy outdoor tasks. I have several changes of the "uniform", because I prefer to do laundry with a full-ish washer/dryer.

    For me, I like to recycle/reuse older clothes for at-home wear, in a way I didn't when my husband was alive, because I really don't care at all how I look now (and I didn't care lots then, because he didn't, either). I hate clothes-shopping, but I think this is also defensible from a recycling standpoint. I feel the same way about some other things: More likely to use certain things until they wear out functionally, compared to some of my friends' practices, not discard things when they start to look worn but are still functional. (I'm not saying this is more virtuous. It's just my way. I'm comparing myself to others I know, but not judging them negatively when I do, I promise.)

    If I'm doing something very dirty indoors or out (transplanting houseplants, carpentry, yard work), I will change into different clothes for that. I change into different clothes for at-home workouts, too, because I sweat lots when working out (even mild workouts). So, I switch into workout leggings or yoga pants (that actually fit) and a workout t-shirt, to work out, wash up or shower after, and change back into the uniform of the day. At home, I'm usually barefoot, or wearing socks/slipper-socks if it's cold.

    When I go out, I switch into purpose-specific workout clothes for outdoor rowing/cycling (water shoes for rowing, running/cross-training shoes for cycling); jeans/plain t-shirts for errands and such (with cross-training shoes or casual leather shoes); and "dress casual" for medical appointments (plain t-shirts, nicer sweaters than for errands, black/gray dressier jeans/chinos or loose linen trousers, black leather shoes). I've found over the years that medical staff treat me as if I were smarter if I dress a bit more "white collar casual" vs. more "blue collar", so I do that for convenience. I don't do dress-up stuff often, but have a couple of simple dressy dresses for warm/cold seasons, and usually wear ballet flats with them. (I hate heels, don't own any. Didn't, even when working in IT management and wearing dresses/suits routinely.)

    Out of the house, when not working out, I'm all about jewelry: Earrings, several bracelets, necklace. One of my craftsy things is making jewelry, and I like wearing it, even though I'm not very clothes/fashion-oriented in other respects.
  • paperpudding
    paperpudding Posts: 7,995 Member
    edited May 2022
    I guess if your normal is to wear business attire and you only wear comfortable clothes when not being productive, then wearing comfortable clothes could make you feel less productive.

    well I dont wear business attire to work - but I do have a uniform shirt which I wear with work pants.

    My job is not one that can be done from home at all so I have no experience of adjusting that to work from home.

    In terms of productivity I cant say I have been all that productive in home isolation, despite being only mildly sick.
    have caught up on the ironing, booked a holiday for September (there is something cathartic about booking flights, accomodation, activities, for a holiday when one is currently not allowed past one's own letter box ;) ) other than that have read some novel, done a jigsaw, caught up on some recorded TV programs, whiled away time on the internet.....


    PS: because my job cannot be done from home and I am an essential worker, I wasnt in isolation during lockdown.
    It is only this 7 day period for me.
  • corinasue1143
    corinasue1143 Posts: 7,469 Member
    Unique case.
    When I was younger (but not young) I dressed for work. When I went to the grocery store, Walmart, etc., I would see older women who dressed more for comfort than beauty. I decided I would be one of them. I always thought, “When I get old I will wear shorts and flip flops and no makeup when I go out. I will bathe, brush my teeth, comb my hair, but I will not use rollers or blow dry or style my hair.
    I turned 70 just about the time Corona hit. I haven’t looked back. I don’t own makeup, hair-styling tools, uncomfortable shoes. I don’t think I ever will again.
    Does it make me less productive? I don’t think so. I’m retired. From work. From homemaking. From hostessing. From serious cooking. From dressing for others.
  • Xellercin
    Xellercin Posts: 925 Member
    Unique case.
    When I was younger (but not young) I dressed for work. When I went to the grocery store, Walmart, etc., I would see older women who dressed more for comfort than beauty. I decided I would be one of them. I always thought, “When I get old I will wear shorts and flip flops and no makeup when I go out. I will bathe, brush my teeth, comb my hair, but I will not use rollers or blow dry or style my hair.
    I turned 70 just about the time Corona hit. I haven’t looked back. I don’t own makeup, hair-styling tools, uncomfortable shoes. I don’t think I ever will again.
    Does it make me less productive? I don’t think so. I’m retired. From work. From homemaking. From hostessing. From serious cooking. From dressing for others.

    Same, but I retired at 37, lol, and I stopped doing all that stuff by my early 30s. My work took over my life and it required me to basically wear pyjamas, and my face and hair were covered a lot of the time, so hair and makeup were pointless. Me and my colleagues make fun of the peers who get dolled up just to get splattered with other people's body fluids. It's just ridiculous.

    I do the serious cooking though, but I only started doing that *after* I semi-retired a few years before the pandemic. My husband did all of the cooking when I worked full time. We're both grateful for the change, lol. He's not the best cook.

    My favourite part of my transition away from fussy "normal" women's attire? Ditching the stupid purses. I went back to my university backpack many years ago and would never go back to those awkward, unweildy, purses.

    Actually, my favourite part is learning to be comfortable with how I look without any of the fuss. My mom still can't leave the house without full makeup, doing her hair, and coordinating an outfit. She lives in the woods outside of a small town where NO ONE could possibly care what a random senior lady looks like, but she's a former model and the indoctrination runs deep with her.

    She often won't leave the house because she doesn't have the energy to jump through the beauty hoops. Meanwhile I can be ready to leave the house in under 45 seconds, and feel completely comfortable being seen exactly as I am. It's awesome.
  • DaffyGirl88
    DaffyGirl88 Posts: 3,664 Member
    edited May 2022
    At the start of the pandemic when we started working from home almost exclusively, my partner was living across the country and it was just me and my pets at home. Our computers did not have webcams so no video calls. No one saw me unless I went to the store or out for a run. I still got up every morning, took a shower, and changed into casual clothes (jeans and a t-shirt) each day before starting work. I would normally wear khakis and a button up shirt at the office. I needed some routine and sense of normalcy and boundary between work and home. Wearing pajamas all day is a road too far for me.

    We are currently hybrid and my partner now lives with me again. I still follow that same routine on my work from home days.

    This ^^

    I learned a few days into teleworking (and am still teleworking after 2 + years) that I had to be showered and dressed before I sat down at my desk to begin work at 6:30. Prior to teleworking I got up at 4:00 AM EST and went to the gym before work. My gym never reopened (a COVID casualty) but I have kept the same routine. I get up, go to my basement gym and shower before I start work. One added bonus as that with the time that I used to commute I can now sit and enjoy a quiet cup of coffee and read my book between my shower and my 6:30 start time.

    I tried sweat pants, yoga pants and workout gear but never was comfortable working that way. Gone are the business suits and dresses that I used to wear daily, but I'm definitely dressed.

    Even without the whole isolation / teleworking thing though, previously if I had been sick with a cold or flu I always felt a lot better if I took a shower and got dressed rather than if I went straight from the bed to the sofa in my PJs. Dressed being a loose term there as it may well have been sweats or lounging PJs. I think that is mostly a psychological thing.
  • Ninkasi
    Ninkasi Posts: 173 Member
    When we were in COVID lockdown I'm not going to lie, I spent a lot of time in my bathrobe. My husband would joke that I was in "Howard Hughes mode." But when I had a Skype or Teams meeting I'd put on a clean shirt and nice yoga pants or leggings, even though we don't use cameras in our meetings. I absolutely agree it's a psychological thing; putting neat, clean clothes on helped me feel more on point and ready to present and discuss ideas instead of feeling lazy or schlubby.
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 41,295 Member
    I was working from home for 18 months. For the first couple of weeks it was pretty much PJs or sweat pants...I think it was more of a comfort thing with the shock of one day everything being pretty much normal and the next my entire state was shut down except for grocery stores. I can't say whether or not it affected my mood or anything because the whole damn thing had my anxiety high and I felt depressed and unmotivated...don't think it was so much the PJs as it was the state of affairs at that time.

    After that first couple of weeks of shock, I just wore my normal off hours casual wear. Shorts and t-shirts in the summer and jeans and a long sleeve t-shirt or sweater in the winter. When I had COVID and had to isolate I pretty much wore PJs for the period of time that I was actually symptomatic and sick...but I was mostly either in bed or on the couch watching tv. That was only a couple of days...after that I just dressed normally.
  • ythannah
    ythannah Posts: 4,299 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    When I go out, I switch into purpose-specific workout clothes for outdoor rowing/cycling (water shoes for rowing, running/cross-training shoes for cycling); jeans/plain t-shirts for errands and such (with cross-training shoes or casual leather shoes); and "dress casual" for medical appointments (plain t-shirts, nicer sweaters than for errands, black/gray dressier jeans/chinos or loose linen trousers, black leather shoes). I've found over the years that medical staff treat me as if I were smarter if I dress a bit more "white collar casual" vs. more "blue collar", so I do that for convenience. I don't do dress-up stuff often, but have a couple of simple dressy dresses for warm/cold seasons, and usually wear ballet flats with them. (I hate heels, don't own any. Didn't, even when working in IT management and wearing dresses/suits routinely.)

    That's an interesting observation. I've often played with wardrobe and the assumptions of others for fun, like dressing very casually (almost grunge) and browsing in a high-end clothing store, or checking out a mall real estate display. If you don't want to be approached by pushy salespeople, dress like you can't afford the merchandise. :D I would never have applied that principle to medical settings though. I tend to dress for convenience... if I know I'm going to need to strip for tests, I wear things that go on and off easily, no jewellery etc. When I went to Emergency last year I strongly suspected that surgery was going to be the end result (and I was right) so I deliberately chose loose comfy clothes that could go back on after surgery.

    As an aside, when I was reading your "dress casual" examples, I initially misread one of the items as "black leather pants" and I thought "Oooh, GO Ann!"
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 26,929 Member
    ythannah wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    When I go out, I switch into purpose-specific workout clothes for outdoor rowing/cycling (water shoes for rowing, running/cross-training shoes for cycling); jeans/plain t-shirts for errands and such (with cross-training shoes or casual leather shoes); and "dress casual" for medical appointments (plain t-shirts, nicer sweaters than for errands, black/gray dressier jeans/chinos or loose linen trousers, black leather shoes). I've found over the years that medical staff treat me as if I were smarter if I dress a bit more "white collar casual" vs. more "blue collar", so I do that for convenience. I don't do dress-up stuff often, but have a couple of simple dressy dresses for warm/cold seasons, and usually wear ballet flats with them. (I hate heels, don't own any. Didn't, even when working in IT management and wearing dresses/suits routinely.)

    That's an interesting observation. I've often played with wardrobe and the assumptions of others for fun, like dressing very casually (almost grunge) and browsing in a high-end clothing store, or checking out a mall real estate display. If you don't want to be approached by pushy salespeople, dress like you can't afford the merchandise. :D I would never have applied that principle to medical settings though. I tend to dress for convenience... if I know I'm going to need to strip for tests, I wear things that go on and off easily, no jewellery etc. When I went to Emergency last year I strongly suspected that surgery was going to be the end result (and I was right) so I deliberately chose loose comfy clothes that could go back on after surgery.

    As an aside, when I was reading your "dress casual" examples, I initially misread one of the items as "black leather pants" and I thought "Oooh, GO Ann!"

    I think "office casual white collar-ish" and "comfy and easy to put on/take off" are not mutually exclusive, with care. Perfect: Some relaxed-fit linen pants I have (in 3 colors, because!), and a relaxed sweater or simple jacket over a t-shirt or tank top, some nice-looking flat shoes.

    I noticed the effect when I was taking my dad to some of his doctors' appointments, at a time when he was unable to drive. If it was impromptu, I might be wearing jeans and a slogan t-shirt, and I felt I was far more likely to be talked down to (not necessarily unkindly). I remember one PA who looked quite surprised when I said dad had a central retinal vein occlusion. She stopped, looked at me wide-eyed, and said (sounding slightly stunned) "Are you a provider?"

    I'm with you on messing with people to some extent: One of the funnest shopping expeditions I had (multi store) was when I needed to replace a lovely plum-colored wool midi-length Winter coat I wore to work, that was wearing out but also had become impractical for reasons about to be revealed. When the salesperson at each store approached, asked what I was looking for in a coat, the answer was: "Something that matches my cats." The best one - only one who did anything adequate - said "What color are your cats?" "Tweed." (I had two gray/black/white tabbies, plus a couple of multicolored beagles at the time.) Some were completely nonplussed. Hilarious.
  • 33gail33
    33gail33 Posts: 1,155 Member
    Well I felt like crap when I had Covid so I didn't get dressed up. I don't wear pyjamas per se - I sleep in T shirts and shorts/trackpants so that is what I wore.

    When I was working from home extensively, and still when I work from home 2-3 days per week, what I wear is irrelevant to my productivity. I'm wearing a loose tank top and "harem" type pants right now (something I would never wear to the office). That is my at home "uniform" whether I am working or not. My productivity is based on my workload not what I'm wearing.

    My office has definitely become more casual since Covid started - "casual friday" lasts the whole week now.
  • ythannah
    ythannah Posts: 4,299 Member
    33gail33 wrote: »
    My office has definitely become more casual since Covid started - "casual friday" lasts the whole week now.

    I wish ours had lasted but we were only allowed to be casual from mid-March 2020 until September 2021. :( At least I had the benefit of it in April 21 when I just wouldn't have been comfortable stuffing my post-surgery abdomen into normal dress pants.
  • I2k4
    I2k4 Posts: 177 Member
    edited June 2022
    The (Ontario, Canada) pandemic lockdowns, as such, didn't change anything I wear but did radically change the allocation of time wearing them: within my preferred fabric limits of cotton, wool, and nylon outerwear the closets hold a range of going out clothes. Normally home wear is sweats / shorts and sandals, with a set aside casual outfit for routine shopping and another for condo gym workouts. Pandemic restrictions mainly meant a whole lot more time in home wear, with two oddities: dressing up and setting a backdrop for video calls was one, the other was a change to putting on workout clothing. Going to the gym or out of doors for an hour or two meant changing into suitably techy "gym strip" and shoes for public presentation, but once it was locked up I tended to just grab a resistance band or dumbbells several times a day at home in what I was wearing anyway, usually barefoot. The gym reopened early this year, using it weekly but I like the casual short in-home sessions and will see if / when it's necessary to push a structured program again.
  • hesn92
    hesn92 Posts: 5,969 Member
    edited June 2022
    I always wear comfy clothing when I'm not in the office and don't have anywhere to be other than maybe running an errand, but not pajamas. I wear leggings, sweat shorts, tank tops, hoodies etc. and they need to look good on me and fit me well otherwise I feel like a slob. I used to dress business casual in the office M-Th but ever since coming back from working at home, I dress casual all week long. I think office wear is dumb. lol.
  • Sand_TIger
    Sand_TIger Posts: 891 Member
    Ha ha, bathrobe for me. Fuzzy and often sprinkled with cat hair. If I had a Zoom meeting I might put on a shirt or aim the camera so it just showed my face.
  • siberiantarragon
    siberiantarragon Posts: 202 Member
    I wore the same clothes I normally wear during the shutdowns. I don't wear any clothes that aren't comfortable. I don't know if I have one of those sensory processing issues or something but I'm very sensitive to uncomfortable sensory things. If I'm wearing something uncomfortable I won't be able to concentrate the entire day. I also have to shower and wash my hair every day for this reason -- I read about people during lockdown who didn't shower for weeks at a time and I don't understand it.

    Luckily there are plenty of comfortable dresses, blouses, and dress pants out there. Even jeans have changed in the past decade or so to be more stretchy and more like jeggings. For casual wear I usually wear jeans (shorts or a skort if it's hot out) and a casual top. For less casual wear I wear a dress with leggings, or dress pants and a blouse. And I only wear sneakers or flats. I don't like to wear any shoes that I can't run in, in case of emergency. Also, I don't do anything special with my hair besides washing and sometimes blow-drying. I can't stand products in my hair and don't know how to do hair anyway. I do wear makeup but not every day and I only put on very basic makeup that takes a few minutes, since that's the limit of my makeup capabilities anyway. I also never wear underwire bras because they really irritate my skin.