Exercise calories?

Options
What to the majority do with these additional calories? Add them to balance to eat or not? Finding that i am humgrier on days i work out.

Replies

  • Dellagirl5316
    Dellagirl5316 Posts: 24 Member
    Options
    I spent 6 weeks tracking and I ate The added calories, did not loose, last week I did not add them and lost 7 lbs
  • tomcustombuilder
    tomcustombuilder Posts: 1,744 Member
    Options
    I don’t add exercise calories. My exercise program is pretty consistent all the time so I just go for a straight daily target that’s the same every day.

    MFP can be off on their exercise calorie amounts. The calorie burn will also be different for different people so I just leave it out of the equation, eliminating one more thing to factor in that is probably incorrect anyway.

    It’s a personal choice on how to approach it. Some people add the calories, some don’t and some add 50%. Your progress or lack of it will determine if you’re on the right track or not.

  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 32,442 Member
    Options
    Estimated them carefully all through weight loss (class 1 obese to a healthy weight, 50-some pounds, in less than a year), and ate them all back. Same thing for 7+ years of maintenance since, staying at a healthy weight that whole time.

    Not properly fueling exercise - i.e., totally ignoring that calorie burn - would not let my exercise give me the health, strength, and fitness benefits that are important to me. I don't exercise to lose weight, I do the forms of exercise I do in order to get better at them, and improve my fitness.

    If a person is going for a very conservative weight loss rate, like less than 0.5% of current weight per week, and only doing a couple of hundred calories of exercise 3x a week or something like that, it may be fine to let exercise calories increase the calorie deficit to lose weight faster.

    If someone's shooting for an aggressive weight loss rate, like above 1% of current weight per week, and doing several hundreds of calories of exercise daily (or near daily), that's a recipe for increased health risk, fatigue, burnout, and maybe worse.

    In between those extremes, it's a question of how much health risk you like in your life. For me, good health is a key reason why both fitness and healthy weight are worth pursuing, so I'm not going to take stupid chances.

    That said, it's pretty common for people to over-estimate exercise calories. (Even fitness trackers only estimate calorie, they don't measure calorie burn. They do it pretty well for some exercises, pretty poorly for others.)

  • Lullaby2021
    Lullaby2021 Posts: 121 Member
    Options

    I spent 6 weeks tracking and I ate The added calories, did not loose, last week I did not add them and lost 7 lbs
    I went through the exact same thing you did. While eating exercise calories back. Didn’t lose anything for over one month. When I stop eating all them exercise calories. I lost around four lbs. within 1 month and a week.




  • cmriverside
    cmriverside Posts: 34,023 Member
    Options
    Like Ann, I always ate every single delicious "exercise calorie."

    I used a food scale and logged food with verified entries (that I verified myself, to the gram.) So I was confident in my food logging skillset. I used a flat 300 calories per hour of moderate exercise. That was a number I chose after using a heart rate monitor, and averaging the numbers given by several online calculators for exercise.

    That number worked for me. I lost at the rate I chose in the goals. We each have our own way of doing things. You do have to run the experiment and figure it out.

    Find your way. In some aspects it depends on accuracy if you're going to depend on a FOOD log but how you approach that accuracy can be individualized and will always have a margin of error. I figure I make a couple hundred calories a day of errors, and I'm pretty careful. In some human endeavors exactitude isn't really possible. Luckily with weight loss - close enough is good enough (within reasonable margins.)
  • csplatt
    csplatt Posts: 1,029 Member
    Options
    i eat them back because i purposefully set my activity level to sedentary.
  • spiriteagle99
    spiriteagle99 Posts: 3,681 Member
    edited June 2023
    Options
    I eat back all my exercise calories. I lost 55 lbs. and have maintained that loss for about 10 years. Since I walk 2-3 miles and run 5-6 most days, it adds up. I have found that if I eat less, I am starving at night and don't sleep.
  • vivmom2014
    vivmom2014 Posts: 1,647 Member
    Options
    I eat back all my exercise calories.
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 27,975 Member
    Options
    I don’t add exercise calories. My exercise program is pretty consistent all the time so I just go for a straight daily target that’s the same every day.

    MFP can be off on their exercise calorie amounts. The calorie burn will also be different for different people so I just leave it out of the equation, eliminating one more thing to factor in that is probably incorrect anyway.

    It’s a personal choice on how to approach it. Some people add the calories, some don’t and some add 50%. Your progress or lack of it will determine if you’re on the right track or not.

    Are you getting your daily target from MFP or a TDEE calculator?
  • tomcustombuilder
    tomcustombuilder Posts: 1,744 Member
    edited June 2023
    Options
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    I don’t add exercise calories. My exercise program is pretty consistent all the time so I just go for a straight daily target that’s the same every day.

    MFP can be off on their exercise calorie amounts. The calorie burn will also be different for different people so I just leave it out of the equation, eliminating one more thing to factor in that is probably incorrect anyway.

    It’s a personal choice on how to approach it. Some people add the calories, some don’t and some add 50%. Your progress or lack of it will determine if you’re on the right track or not.

    Are you getting your daily target from MFP or a TDEE calculator?
    None. After 20 years of tracking I know what my weekly calorie amount needs to be to lose when I’m actually in Fatloss mode so I set my own calorie target of 1,700. My activities, both exercise, sports and NEAT Haven’t changed much so I just stick with what works. Thats good for 1- 1 1/2 lbs of loss per week. More 1 than 1 1/2 now than I’m older and slightly less active however the 1,700 tends to be the sweet spot for overall compliance and comfort.

  • onhaltn
    onhaltn Posts: 28 Member
    Options
    I find MFP vastly exaggerates the calories lost for a particular exercise (I swim laps and use a stationary bike) so I just ignore this. If I keep to my 1200 limit, I lose weight pretty steadily and I try within that limit to reserve some calories for a low cal snack before bed, like an apple or nonfat yogurt.