Indian dishes, their english names and calories in them

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I'm new on this app.I'm on a weight gain journey. I don't know how to count calories in my food because all of my food is homemade. Another problem i find it really hard to find Indian dishes on this app. All the names are confusing .Can anyone here help me in any manner ?

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  • yirara
    yirara Posts: 9,509 Member
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    Don't use full meals from the app. If you buy a meal somewhere try to find the calories from that food outlet or supermarket. If you cook the food yourself then use the app how it's meant to: measure (weight) all ingredients and you'll get your total.

    There's no point in using recipes from other people because you have no idea what went into them and hence it might be completely different to what you eat. I cook a lot of Indian food, but it generally fits my calorie goal and is fairly low calorie. But overall Indian food can be extremely high calorie.
  • Corina1143
    Corina1143 Posts: 3,087 Member
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    Have you found the recipe section? If you add your own recipes, you will get the calories right.
    For the names of foods, Google it, for instance, look for "capsicum in English". It's very time consuming and frustrating at first, but worth it when you get most of your favorite recipes added!
    Patience!
  • KMNV9512
    KMNV9512 Posts: 8 Member
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    @Corina1143 Thank you Corina for your response. The variety of spices and ingredients we add in our dishes is huge. Calculating their calories is gonna take a huge time. But as you said it's worth it when we get all your recipes added. 👍
  • sollyn23l2
    sollyn23l2 Posts: 1,669 Member
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    KMNV9512 wrote: »
    @Corina1143 Thank you Corina for your response. The variety of spices and ingredients we add in our dishes is huge. Calculating their calories is gonna take a huge time. But as you said it's worth it when we get all your recipes added. 👍

    Keep in mind, spices add minimal calories and probably don't need to be added. Just the "food" components, so to speak.
  • KMNV9512
    KMNV9512 Posts: 8 Member
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    @yirara Thank you for the response. let me introduce you to the big picture. I live in a village. We get most of our food items from our farm. My mum cooks food for the family. And the dishes she cook are local dishes so th + I don't even know the basics of cooking. Like don't even know the difference between cooked and fried. So if you help me find out calories in my food it'd be a great help as you've cooked a few indian dishes
  • henridw2095
    henridw2095 Posts: 978 Member
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    Hello @KMNV9512 I’m not Indian, but really like to cook Indian food. Here are my tricks to track:

    1. Use the recipe function as mentioned above.
    2. During cooking, I often use pen and paper to add the recipe later, when I’m done.
    3. I don’t bother added spices into my recipe on MFP, they don’t have many calories. I also don’t bother with garlic and ginger. Especially if your goal is weight gain, they won’t contribute much.
    4. I measure (oil) and weigh (everything else) as I go and write down the amounts.
    5. At the end, I transfer the entire dish into a container on my food scale. I use the weight in grams as the number of servings in the recipe. My recent stew had 1860g = 1860 servings. Each portion I eat is weighed, allowing me to track accurately.
    6. The next time I cook the dish, I edit the recipe.
    7. If there are alternative ingredients in the dish, I keep unused alternatives in the recipe but set amount to 0. That way, they’re ready to be recorded next time. For example, if you’re cooking the same dish with chickpeas or kidney beans, I keep both in my recipe.

    This sounds like a lot of work, but it becomes easy with a bit of practice and really works, especially if you often cook the same things.
  • henridw2095
    henridw2095 Posts: 978 Member
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    Just saw your mom does the cooking…the bottom line is, for gaining weight, you need to eat more. You could watch her cook or help, learning how to cook is a good skill!
  • yirara
    yirara Posts: 9,509 Member
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    sollyn23l2 wrote: »
    KMNV9512 wrote: »
    @Corina1143 Thank you Corina for your response. The variety of spices and ingredients we add in our dishes is huge. Calculating their calories is gonna take a huge time. But as you said it's worth it when we get all your recipes added. 👍

    Keep in mind, spices add minimal calories and probably don't need to be added. Just the "food" components, so to speak.

    Hmm.. depends. If I cook dodo wat then I usually have over 100cal just in spices for a single serving. The same might be true for some Indian dishes. A lot of spices are rather high in fats, and cooking with a lot of them just adds quite some unexpected calories.
  • neanderthin
    neanderthin Posts: 10,016 Member
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    yirara wrote: »
    sollyn23l2 wrote: »
    KMNV9512 wrote: »
    @Corina1143 Thank you Corina for your response. The variety of spices and ingredients we add in our dishes is huge. Calculating their calories is gonna take a huge time. But as you said it's worth it when we get all your recipes added. 👍

    Keep in mind, spices add minimal calories and probably don't need to be added. Just the "food" components, so to speak.

    Hmm.. depends. If I cook dodo wat then I usually have over 100cal just in spices for a single serving. The same might be true for some Indian dishes. A lot of spices are rather high in fats, and cooking with a lot of them just adds quite some unexpected calories.

    Seriously? What spices are over 100 calories for a single serving and which spices are high in fat, just curious.
  • sollyn23l2
    sollyn23l2 Posts: 1,669 Member
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    yirara wrote: »
    sollyn23l2 wrote: »
    KMNV9512 wrote: »
    @Corina1143 Thank you Corina for your response. The variety of spices and ingredients we add in our dishes is huge. Calculating their calories is gonna take a huge time. But as you said it's worth it when we get all your recipes added. 👍

    Keep in mind, spices add minimal calories and probably don't need to be added. Just the "food" components, so to speak.

    Hmm.. depends. If I cook dodo wat then I usually have over 100cal just in spices for a single serving. The same might be true for some Indian dishes. A lot of spices are rather high in fats, and cooking with a lot of them just adds quite some unexpected calories.

    I'm wondering if maybe spices means something else in a different language? I just... we can't be talking about the same thing.
  • middlehaitch
    middlehaitch Posts: 8,485 Member
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    I think Yirara is talking about Doro Wat which uses Niter Kibbeh, a spiced butter. That is what makes the spices so high in cals.
    For me, just like ghee being an important part of many Indian dishes, the amount can be played with so you get the satisfying taste with less cals.
    Cheers, h.
  • history_grrrl
    history_grrrl Posts: 214 Member
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    For an example, I use a recipe for chicken tikka masala that has the following ingredients. I have it under Recipes at five servings of one cup each. Each ingredient is in the MFP database, and the total comes out to about 330 calories per serving. Since I’m trying to lose weight, I cut back on the butter and oil and use no-fat yoghurt. This doesn’t include rice or naan, but you can certainly gain weight with those. I second the suggestion to shadow and even help your mother in the kitchen so you will know what ingredients to record. Good luck! I could happily eat Indian food every day.

    1 cup, Tomato sauce
    1 cup, Coconut milk
    0.71 kg(s), Boneless, Skinless Chicken Thighs
    0.50 Cup (175g), Greek Yogurt - Plain 0%
    4 clove , Garlic
    4 tsp, Raw Ginger
    2 teaspoon, Cumin, ground
    1.10 teaspoon, Chili powder
    1 teaspoon, Salt
    1 tablespoon, Canola oil
    193 gram, Red onion
    1 tsp, packed, Brown sugar
    3 tsp, Garam Masala
    1 tablespoon, Unsalted Butter
  • yirara
    yirara Posts: 9,509 Member
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    I think Yirara is talking about Doro Wat which uses Niter Kibbeh, a spiced butter. That is what makes the spices so high in cals.
    For me, just like ghee being an important part of many Indian dishes, the amount can be played with so you get the satisfying taste with less cals.
    Cheers, h.

    No, there’s just a lot of different peppers and paprika powder in it and some other aromatics. 30gr of those combined give you about 100kcal. And you can easily add so much spice to a single serving.
  • sollyn23l2
    sollyn23l2 Posts: 1,669 Member
    edited October 2023
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    yirara wrote: »
    I think Yirara is talking about Doro Wat which uses Niter Kibbeh, a spiced butter. That is what makes the spices so high in cals.
    For me, just like ghee being an important part of many Indian dishes, the amount can be played with so you get the satisfying taste with less cals.
    Cheers, h.

    No, there’s just a lot of different peppers and paprika powder in it and some other aromatics. 30gr of those combined give you about 100kcal. And you can easily add so much spice to a single serving.

    Paprika has 20 calories in 100 grams. And red chili pepper has 20 calories in 30 grams. So I'm still not sure where the difference in calories comes in? Oh well, no matter.
  • yirara
    yirara Posts: 9,509 Member
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    For example cayenne pepper, the powder, not the fresh vegetable has about 310 calories per 100gr. and this way you easily get to 100cal per serving. I was talking spices, not vegetables.
  • neanderthin
    neanderthin Posts: 10,016 Member
    edited October 2023
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    yirara wrote: »
    For example cayenne pepper, the powder, not the fresh vegetable has about 310 calories per 100gr. and this way you easily get to 100cal per serving. I was talking spices, not vegetables.

    Yeah, I think your just getting confused with weight measurements.

    Your right that 100g's of cayenne is 310 calories but 100g's of that spice is equivalent to 12 tbsps. 1 tbsp is around 17 calories and 1tbsp of cayenne or any spice mixture would probably make 4 to 6 servings.
  • yirara
    yirara Posts: 9,509 Member
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    yirara wrote: »
    For example cayenne pepper, the powder, not the fresh vegetable has about 310 calories per 100gr. and this way you easily get to 100cal per serving. I was talking spices, not vegetables.

    Yeah, I think your just getting confused with weight measurements.

    Your right that 100g's of cayenne is 310 calories but 100g's of that spice is equivalent to 12 tbsps. 1 tbsp is around 17 calories and 1tbsp of cayenne or any spice mixture would probably make 4 to 6 servings.

    No, not getting confused. I do have a few recipes where the 'sauce' is mostly made up of masses of spices. About 30gr, hence about 100cal. And no, when prepared properly it doesn't get bitter or tasteless. It's strong though, yeah.
  • neanderthin
    neanderthin Posts: 10,016 Member
    edited October 2023
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    yirara wrote: »
    yirara wrote: »
    For example cayenne pepper, the powder, not the fresh vegetable has about 310 calories per 100gr. and this way you easily get to 100cal per serving. I was talking spices, not vegetables.

    Yeah, I think your just getting confused with weight measurements.

    Your right that 100g's of cayenne is 310 calories but 100g's of that spice is equivalent to 12 tbsps. 1 tbsp is around 17 calories and 1tbsp of cayenne or any spice mixture would probably make 4 to 6 servings.

    No, not getting confused. I do have a few recipes where the 'sauce' is mostly made up of masses of spices. About 30gr, hence about 100cal. And no, when prepared properly it doesn't get bitter or tasteless. It's strong though, yeah.

    Your example of a recipe was dodo wat but I think you meant doro wat which is an Ethiopia stew which I'm pretty familiar with, served it in my restaurant a few times and it generally calls for berbere spice, anyway, a typical recipe has about 3-4tbsp's and I've also seen recipes with half that amount that feeds around 6-8 people or more. You can make a recipe anything you want, in any amounts you want, but personally, the amounts your alluding to I've never seen and can't find in any recipe as a single serving.

    For example that tikka masala dish above uses about 1.5lbs of chicken thigh and uses 2 tbsp's of spice, which if a portion is 4oz of meat then that is a serving of 6 and is typical as far a spicing in India. Doesn't matter though, if that's how much spice you consume in a single serving, then who cares but you, and your counting it. Cheers