Gained weight with calorie deficit

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I restarted myfitnesspal to lose weight. I am premeno so weight gain is reality. I have been entering food according to the food label on the products. I am also avid runner I run 6 times a week. My calories intake is much less than burn. At the end of the day I complete my diary with a notice saying If you day is like this you will weight ... It did not happened. I gained weight. Not impressed with this app then.
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Replies

  • tomcustombuilder
    tomcustombuilder Posts: 1,801 Member
    edited April 24
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    How long have you been at this calorie amount? If less than a month there can be water fluctuations.

    This app or any app can be inaccurate between crowd sourced data entries, exercise calories burned being inflated, you picking the wrong activity level and\or under reporting calorie consumption. Product labels can be as much as 20% off. It's always best if you knew your weekly calorie amounts as a benchmark before going into a new program.

    In the end, your body doesn't know numbers, only if it's being given calories to either gain mass, lose mass or maintain mass.
  • sollyn23l2
    sollyn23l2 Posts: 1,664 Member
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    holankerri wrote: »
    I restarted myfitnesspal to lose weight. I am premeno so weight gain is reality. I have been entering food according to the food label on the products. I am also avid runner I run 6 times a week. My calories intake is much less than burn. At the end of the day I complete my diary with a notice saying If you day is like this you will weight ... It did not happened. I gained weight. Not impressed with this app then.

    I think you need to familiarize yourself with how a calorie deficit works. I will not give you the information here, as you won't listen anyway. But I suggest you research it a bit for yourself. Or, just decide you'll continue to be big. That's ok too.
  • Seffell
    Seffell Posts: 2,222 Member
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    weight =/= fat
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 48,659 Member
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    You didn't gain weight from calories unless you really didn't track what you ate. Water weight fluctuates people's weight on a daily basis based on many factors.
    Also did you weigh the same time? If you weighed in the morning, and even ate in a calorie deficit and weighed later in the day, you'd likely weigh more.
    The app works fine. It's usually people that make the error or sometimes your body just doesn't cooperate for awhile.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 35+ years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 32,697 Member
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    Seffell wrote: »
    weight =/= fat

    That's a great point.

    Loosely, weight is water, other lean tissue (muscle, bone, etc.), fat, food in transit, a surprising weight of some gut microbes not even genetically us (maybe up to 5 pounds-ish), and probably some small stuff I'm forgetting.

    If a person is in an actual calorie deficit, they will lose weight in the form of fat or lean tissue. (An actual deficit is not synonymous with estimated amount of calories that MFP, a calculator or fitness tracker will spit out based on limited data. Those are statistical averages for similar people, and not everyone is average, though most (not all) are close.)

    Muscle can be gained, but even under best circumstances so slowly that it will not outpace a meaningful fat loss rate achieved by a calorie deficit, as a practical matter. Bone weight can also change, but even more slowly. Gains in either of those don't happen by accident. (Losses may.)

    Water weight is extra weird in its behavior, but very large amounts of it tend to be observable on the body. Water retention can be a symptom of some serious medical conditions, though: Edema/oedema.

    If someone is in an actual deficit (not calculator theory), and they aren't losing weight over a multi-week period, a visit to the doctor would be a good plan, I think.

    In a case like the OPs where she is seemingly feeling healthy (running multiple times a week for example) the much more likely explanation is logging errors or not being statistically average in calorie needs.

    We all make logging errors along the way, so that's not a jab. And while it's rare, it's possible to be quite far from those statistical averages. (MFP's estimate and my good brand/model(s) of trackers are about 25-30% off in daily calorie estimates for me, for example, compared with almost 9 years of careful logging data . . . in my case, the estimate is hundreds of calories daily too low. The estimates can also be too low, but I don't know what the lower extreme would be in a healthy person.)

    I'd give the edge to some kind of logging issue, based on my subjective estimate of probability.
  • bikecheryl
    bikecheryl Posts: 1,432 Member
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    Are you using a scale to measure your food or eyeballing it?
  • csplatt
    csplatt Posts: 1,049 Member
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    gaining fat is not the same thing as gaining a few numbers on the scale. those are related but not the same.
  • springlering62
    springlering62 Posts: 7,769 Member
    edited April 28
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    Your “join” date is April 24, and are here on April 24th complaining the app isn’t working for you.

    On what planet does this make any sense?

    I’m not impressed, either. With the effort you’ve put in.
  • Lietchi
    Lietchi Posts: 6,264 Member
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    Your “join” date is April 24, and are here on April 24th complaining the app isn’t working for you.

    On what planet does this make any sense?

    I’m not impressed, either. With the effort you’ve put in.

    Be careful not to confuse the date they joined the community with the date they joined MFP...

    acobr0l5ag7n.jpg
  • springlering62
    springlering62 Posts: 7,769 Member
    edited April 28
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    Lietchi wrote: »
    Your “join” date is April 24, and are here on April 24th complaining the app isn’t working for you.

    On what planet does this make any sense?

    I’m not impressed, either. With the effort you’ve put in.

    Be careful not to confuse the date they joined the community with the date they joined MFP...

    acobr0l5ag7n.jpg
    Thanks for the save. When I look at user and even when I drill down to profile , it gives me the newer date. 🤦🏻‍♀️

    Apologies to OP.
  • NCGOALIEMOM
    NCGOALIEMOM Posts: 80 Member
    edited April 28
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    Several factors. The calculation is strictly based on calories in vs calories out. Unfortunately that’s flawed science as every body has variables that complicate that.

    First question would be: are you weighing your food as you log. Packages are often very misleading about a serving. Example: it may say a serving is 1/2 cup or x amount of grams. When you weigh out in grams (which is what all on their calculations are based off of) it often times isn’t a full half cup. My vegan butter was an example. It said a serving was a tablespoon or x number of grams. For years I just measured with a tablespoon. When I got really serious about counting macros I weighed out the amount of grams that a serving was and it was HALF a tablespoon. At 100 calories a serving I was getting double as the calories the package said I was getting.

    Second question: how many calories are you eating? You may not be eating nearly enough calories for the amount of exercise you are doing. How many grams of protein are you getting? With the amount of exercise you are doing you need a gram per pound of ideal body weight at a MINIMUM. I have to eat 180g a day to keep my protein lab in normal range.

    Third question: do you weight train at all? As we get older we really need to hit the weights for a multiple of reasons. I lift so heavy that I can never do more than 8-10 reps. If I can do 10 I add 5 pounds. That extra muscle mass makes our RMR higher and burns more calories overall (not to mention the rest of the benefits as we age).

    Last question: how often are you weighing yourself? It’s normal for our weight to fluctuate 3-5 pounds daily. I always weigh first thing in the morning, nude and preferably after a bowel movement. (I’ve literally pood 3 pounds before). If you happen to weigh on a day that your weight is up, you’ll think you had a gain…when reality you didn’t. I weigh every morning and then I take the weekly average. That shows an accurate trend. My weight goes up 3 pounds after leg day. I will stay up 3 pounds for 2-3 days. It’s fluid retention from the tearing of muscle fibers. If you are sore, you are tearing muscle fibers (which is necessary to gain muscle) if I eat tacos, the sodium will put me up a pound or two for at least a day. Fluctuating is totally normal.

    Hope this helps.
  • Retroguy2000
    Retroguy2000 Posts: 1,542 Member
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    OP posted once and apparently never came back.
  • cmriverside
    cmriverside Posts: 34,071 Member
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    OP posted once and apparently never came back.

    It's been four days...

    ::shrug::
  • tomcustombuilder
    tomcustombuilder Posts: 1,801 Member
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    Several factors. The calculation is strictly based on calories in vs calories out. Unfortunately that’s flawed science as every body has variables that complicate that.

    First question would be: are you weighing your food as you log. Packages are often very misleading about a serving. Example: it may say a serving is 1/2 cup or x amount of grams. When you weigh out in grams (which is what all on their calculations are based off of) it often times isn’t a full half cup. My vegan butter was an example. It said a serving was a tablespoon or x number of grams. For years I just measured with a tablespoon. When I got really serious about counting macros I weighed out the amount of grams that a serving was and it was HALF a tablespoon. At 100 calories a serving I was getting double as the calories the package said I was getting.

    Second question: how many calories are you eating? You may not be eating nearly enough calories for the amount of exercise you are doing. How many grams of protein are you getting? With the amount of exercise you are doing you need a gram per pound of ideal body weight at a MINIMUM. I have to eat 180g a day to keep my protein lab in normal range.

    Third question: do you weight train at all? As we get older we really need to hit the weights for a multiple of reasons. I lift so heavy that I can never do more than 8-10 reps. If I can do 10 I add 5 pounds. That extra muscle mass makes our RMR higher and burns more calories overall (not to mention the rest of the benefits as we age).

    Last question: how often are you weighing yourself? It’s normal for our weight to fluctuate 3-5 pounds daily. I always weigh first thing in the morning, nude and preferably after a bowel movement. (I’ve literally pood 3 pounds before). If you happen to weigh on a day that your weight is up, you’ll think you had a gain…when reality you didn’t. I weigh every morning and then I take the weekly average. That shows an accurate trend. My weight goes up 3 pounds after leg day. I will stay up 3 pounds for 2-3 days. It’s fluid retention from the tearing of muscle fibers. If you are sore, you are tearing muscle fibers (which is necessary to gain muscle) if I eat tacos, the sodium will put me up a pound or two for at least a day. Fluctuating is totally normal.

    Hope this helps.
    please elaborate why CICO is flawed science regarding Fatloss.
    Also a pound of muscle only burns around 6-8 calories a day and many people overestimate that figure in regards to added muscle as a fat burning tool.

  • lisakatz2
    lisakatz2 Posts: 272 Member
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    Several factors. The calculation is strictly based on calories in vs calories out. Unfortunately that’s flawed science as every body has variables that complicate that.

    First question would be: are you weighing your food as you log. Packages are often very misleading about a serving. Example: it may say a serving is 1/2 cup or x amount of grams. When you weigh out in grams (which is what all on their calculations are based off of) it often times isn’t a full half cup. My vegan butter was an example. It said a serving was a tablespoon or x number of grams. For years I just measured with a tablespoon. When I got really serious about counting macros I weighed out the amount of grams that a serving was and it was HALF a tablespoon. At 100 calories a serving I was getting double as the calories the package said I was getting.

    Second question: how many calories are you eating? You may not be eating nearly enough calories for the amount of exercise you are doing. How many grams of protein are you getting? With the amount of exercise you are doing you need a gram per pound of ideal body weight at a MINIMUM. I have to eat 180g a day to keep my protein lab in normal range.

    Third question: do you weight train at all? As we get older we really need to hit the weights for a multiple of reasons. I lift so heavy that I can never do more than 8-10 reps. If I can do 10 I add 5 pounds. That extra muscle mass makes our RMR higher and burns more calories overall (not to mention the rest of the benefits as we age).

    Last question: how often are you weighing yourself? It’s normal for our weight to fluctuate 3-5 pounds daily. I always weigh first thing in the morning, nude and preferably after a bowel movement. (I’ve literally pood 3 pounds before). If you happen to weigh on a day that your weight is up, you’ll think you had a gain…when reality you didn’t. I weigh every morning and then I take the weekly average. That shows an accurate trend. My weight goes up 3 pounds after leg day. I will stay up 3 pounds for 2-3 days. It’s fluid retention from the tearing of muscle fibers. If you are sore, you are tearing muscle fibers (which is necessary to gain muscle) if I eat tacos, the sodium will put me up a pound or two for at least a day. Fluctuating is totally normal.

    Hope this helps.
    please elaborate why CICO is flawed science regarding Fatloss.
    Also a pound of muscle only burns around 6-8 calories a day and many people overestimate that figure in regards to added muscle as a fat burning tool.

    Interesting, I've read 40 calories per pound of muscle mass. Forgot where I read that.
  • neanderthin
    neanderthin Posts: 10,007 Member
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    Sounds legit, we need to rewrite science though. :#
  • tomcustombuilder
    tomcustombuilder Posts: 1,801 Member
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    lisakatz2 wrote: »
    Several factors. The calculation is strictly based on calories in vs calories out. Unfortunately that’s flawed science as every body has variables that complicate that.

    First question would be: are you weighing your food as you log. Packages are often very misleading about a serving. Example: it may say a serving is 1/2 cup or x amount of grams. When you weigh out in grams (which is what all on their calculations are based off of) it often times isn’t a full half cup. My vegan butter was an example. It said a serving was a tablespoon or x number of grams. For years I just measured with a tablespoon. When I got really serious about counting macros I weighed out the amount of grams that a serving was and it was HALF a tablespoon. At 100 calories a serving I was getting double as the calories the package said I was getting.

    Second question: how many calories are you eating? You may not be eating nearly enough calories for the amount of exercise you are doing. How many grams of protein are you getting? With the amount of exercise you are doing you need a gram per pound of ideal body weight at a MINIMUM. I have to eat 180g a day to keep my protein lab in normal range.

    Third question: do you weight train at all? As we get older we really need to hit the weights for a multiple of reasons. I lift so heavy that I can never do more than 8-10 reps. If I can do 10 I add 5 pounds. That extra muscle mass makes our RMR higher and burns more calories overall (not to mention the rest of the benefits as we age).

    Last question: how often are you weighing yourself? It’s normal for our weight to fluctuate 3-5 pounds daily. I always weigh first thing in the morning, nude and preferably after a bowel movement. (I’ve literally pood 3 pounds before). If you happen to weigh on a day that your weight is up, you’ll think you had a gain…when reality you didn’t. I weigh every morning and then I take the weekly average. That shows an accurate trend. My weight goes up 3 pounds after leg day. I will stay up 3 pounds for 2-3 days. It’s fluid retention from the tearing of muscle fibers. If you are sore, you are tearing muscle fibers (which is necessary to gain muscle) if I eat tacos, the sodium will put me up a pound or two for at least a day. Fluctuating is totally normal.

    Hope this helps.
    please elaborate why CICO is flawed science regarding Fatloss.
    Also a pound of muscle only burns around 6-8 calories a day and many people overestimate that figure in regards to added muscle as a fat burning tool.

    Interesting, I've read 40 calories per pound of muscle mass. Forgot where I read that.
    lol,I wish it was 40.