Gained weight with calorie deficit

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  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 32,697 Member
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    lisakatz2 wrote: »
    Several factors. The calculation is strictly based on calories in vs calories out. Unfortunately that’s flawed science as every body has variables that complicate that.

    First question would be: are you weighing your food as you log. Packages are often very misleading about a serving. Example: it may say a serving is 1/2 cup or x amount of grams. When you weigh out in grams (which is what all on their calculations are based off of) it often times isn’t a full half cup. My vegan butter was an example. It said a serving was a tablespoon or x number of grams. For years I just measured with a tablespoon. When I got really serious about counting macros I weighed out the amount of grams that a serving was and it was HALF a tablespoon. At 100 calories a serving I was getting double as the calories the package said I was getting.

    Second question: how many calories are you eating? You may not be eating nearly enough calories for the amount of exercise you are doing. How many grams of protein are you getting? With the amount of exercise you are doing you need a gram per pound of ideal body weight at a MINIMUM. I have to eat 180g a day to keep my protein lab in normal range.

    Third question: do you weight train at all? As we get older we really need to hit the weights for a multiple of reasons. I lift so heavy that I can never do more than 8-10 reps. If I can do 10 I add 5 pounds. That extra muscle mass makes our RMR higher and burns more calories overall (not to mention the rest of the benefits as we age).

    Last question: how often are you weighing yourself? It’s normal for our weight to fluctuate 3-5 pounds daily. I always weigh first thing in the morning, nude and preferably after a bowel movement. (I’ve literally pood 3 pounds before). If you happen to weigh on a day that your weight is up, you’ll think you had a gain…when reality you didn’t. I weigh every morning and then I take the weekly average. That shows an accurate trend. My weight goes up 3 pounds after leg day. I will stay up 3 pounds for 2-3 days. It’s fluid retention from the tearing of muscle fibers. If you are sore, you are tearing muscle fibers (which is necessary to gain muscle) if I eat tacos, the sodium will put me up a pound or two for at least a day. Fluctuating is totally normal.

    Hope this helps.
    please elaborate why CICO is flawed science regarding Fatloss.
    Also a pound of muscle only burns around 6-8 calories a day and many people overestimate that figure in regards to added muscle as a fat burning tool.

    Interesting, I've read 40 calories per pound of muscle mass. Forgot where I read that.

    Sadly, I believe Tom is correct, based on the current research consensus.

    I suspect, though, that having more muscle usually makes it more easy, fun, and even automatic to move more, so that people with more muscle mass may burn more calories in daily life that way.
  • MargaretYakoda
    MargaretYakoda Posts: 2,795 Member
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    The calculation is strictly based on calories in vs calories out. Unfortunately that’s flawed science as every body has variables that complicate that.
    please elaborate why CICO is flawed science regarding Fatloss.
    Also a pound of muscle only burns around 6-8 calories a day and many people overestimate that figure in regards to added muscle as a fat burning tool.

    Variables that complicate it.
    Which the comment then went on to describe some. Including the possibility that some nutritional labels might not be very accurate.

    While the statement maybe could have been made a little more clearly, the essence is not inaccurate.

    CICO? Sure. Strictly speaking.

    But there are factors that may affect individuals and make reasons for not losing weight a bit opaque.

    For example, one I have spotted that may affect disabled people is that “sedentary” apparently assumes 3,000 steps.

    If a person is not walking very much, or even not walking at all, that could mean about 100 to 150 calories a day that someone may be overeating because the app assumes able bodied. Not much for a single day. But over time it could add up.

    That’s just one example.
  • Retroguy2000
    Retroguy2000 Posts: 1,542 Member
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    The calculation is strictly based on calories in vs calories out. Unfortunately that’s flawed science as every body has variables that complicate that.
    please elaborate why CICO is flawed science regarding Fatloss.
    Also a pound of muscle only burns around 6-8 calories a day and many people overestimate that figure in regards to added muscle as a fat burning tool.

    Variables that complicate it.
    Which the comment then went on to describe some. Including the possibility that some nutritional labels might not be very accurate.

    While the statement maybe could have been made a little more clearly, the essence is not inaccurate.

    CICO? Sure. Strictly speaking.

    But there are factors that may affect individuals and make reasons for not losing weight a bit opaque.

    For example, one I have spotted that may affect disabled people is that “sedentary” apparently assumes 3,000 steps.

    If a person is not walking very much, or even not walking at all, that could mean about 100 to 150 calories a day that someone may be overeating because the app assumes able bodied. Not much for a single day. But over time it could add up.

    That’s just one example.
    Complications with tracking are not remotely the same thing as suggesting CICO is flawed science.
  • tomcustombuilder
    tomcustombuilder Posts: 1,801 Member
    edited April 29
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    The calculation is strictly based on calories in vs calories out. Unfortunately that’s flawed science as every body has variables that complicate that.
    please elaborate why CICO is flawed science regarding Fatloss.
    Also a pound of muscle only burns around 6-8 calories a day and many people overestimate that figure in regards to added muscle as a fat burning tool.

    Variables that complicate it.
    Which the comment then went on to describe some. Including the possibility that some nutritional labels might not be very accurate.

    While the statement maybe could have been made a little more clearly, the essence is not inaccurate.

    CICO? Sure. Strictly speaking.

    But there are factors that may affect individuals and make reasons for not losing weight a bit opaque.

    For example, one I have spotted that may affect disabled people is that “sedentary” apparently assumes 3,000 steps.

    If a person is not walking very much, or even not walking at all, that could mean about 100 to 150 calories a day that someone may be overeating because the app assumes able bodied. Not much for a single day. But over time it could add up.

    That’s just one example.
    Just because someone miscalculates their calorie needs doesn’t negate CICO. Your body doesn’t go by what data you input into MFP, it goes by how many calories you actually consume and how many calories you actually burn.

  • neanderthin
    neanderthin Posts: 10,007 Member
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    Apparently complicated is a complicated word. :#
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 48,659 Member
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    lisakatz2 wrote: »
    Several factors. The calculation is strictly based on calories in vs calories out. Unfortunately that’s flawed science as every body has variables that complicate that.

    First question would be: are you weighing your food as you log. Packages are often very misleading about a serving. Example: it may say a serving is 1/2 cup or x amount of grams. When you weigh out in grams (which is what all on their calculations are based off of) it often times isn’t a full half cup. My vegan butter was an example. It said a serving was a tablespoon or x number of grams. For years I just measured with a tablespoon. When I got really serious about counting macros I weighed out the amount of grams that a serving was and it was HALF a tablespoon. At 100 calories a serving I was getting double as the calories the package said I was getting.

    Second question: how many calories are you eating? You may not be eating nearly enough calories for the amount of exercise you are doing. How many grams of protein are you getting? With the amount of exercise you are doing you need a gram per pound of ideal body weight at a MINIMUM. I have to eat 180g a day to keep my protein lab in normal range.

    Third question: do you weight train at all? As we get older we really need to hit the weights for a multiple of reasons. I lift so heavy that I can never do more than 8-10 reps. If I can do 10 I add 5 pounds. That extra muscle mass makes our RMR higher and burns more calories overall (not to mention the rest of the benefits as we age).

    Last question: how often are you weighing yourself? It’s normal for our weight to fluctuate 3-5 pounds daily. I always weigh first thing in the morning, nude and preferably after a bowel movement. (I’ve literally pood 3 pounds before). If you happen to weigh on a day that your weight is up, you’ll think you had a gain…when reality you didn’t. I weigh every morning and then I take the weekly average. That shows an accurate trend. My weight goes up 3 pounds after leg day. I will stay up 3 pounds for 2-3 days. It’s fluid retention from the tearing of muscle fibers. If you are sore, you are tearing muscle fibers (which is necessary to gain muscle) if I eat tacos, the sodium will put me up a pound or two for at least a day. Fluctuating is totally normal.

    Hope this helps.
    please elaborate why CICO is flawed science regarding Fatloss.
    Also a pound of muscle only burns around 6-8 calories a day and many people overestimate that figure in regards to added muscle as a fat burning tool.

    Interesting, I've read 40 calories per pound of muscle mass. Forgot where I read that.
    Yeah whoever wrote that (lol, probably Vshred) is OVEREXAGGERATING calorie burn.


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