Whats your take on fruit (sugar)?

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  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
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    Re fruit in winter vs. summer, I really noticed due to logging that I eat FAR more fruit in the summer (I was never over my sugar in February through April, and over constantly in June through September). I'm eating less again--I just love local summer fruit so much.

    I'm definitely going to go look for cherries and at least pick up some pears.
  • tigersword
    tigersword Posts: 8,059 Member
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    Even the most ardent anti-sugar activists are only recommending limits on ADDED sugar. That doesn't include fruit. The only way eating fruit can be bad for you is if you're eating nothing but fruit and missing nutrients from other sources. Or if you eat too many and go over on calories.
    Sadly enough, there are plenty of "sugar-phobes" that actually do insist people need to restrict or eliminate fruit.
  • Kalikel
    Kalikel Posts: 9,626 Member
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    I really hope people who can have fruit won't give it up because it has sugar in it. You NEED sugar! You can't live without it. Your brain runs on it. If you really and truly didn't take in any, your body would make it's own. Sugar is THAT important. You cannot get sugar out of your body even if you try. So, don't try. :)
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    Re fruit in winter vs. summer, I really noticed due to logging that I eat FAR more fruit in the summer (I was never over my sugar in February through April, and over constantly in June through September). I'm eating less again--I just love local summer fruit so much.

    I'm definitely going to go look for cherries and at least pick up some pears.
    I eat more fresh in the summer. Winter means frozen berries, which are still good, but very tart. I have to add blueberries and blackberries or I can't even eat the others. They also ooze as they thaw. I crumble my Nature Valley Crunchy Granola Apple Crisp bars (I swear I don't work for them) into the mix and it just looks like slop. But they granola soaks up the juicy ooze and OMG, it's all so good!!!

    I just had a Honeycrisp Apple. :)
  • tigersword
    tigersword Posts: 8,059 Member
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    EWJLang wrote: »
    Id suspect that the difference lies in the fact that foods with added sugar do not contain the natural nutrients and fiber that foods with natural sugars carry. Basically, natural sugars have a natural "offset" in their nutrient profile, but added sugars are not naturally balanced in this way.

    I'm not a Nutrition expert, but it seems logical to me that the sugars in a sweet fruit or vegetable are in no way equivalent to those in an added-sugar food.

    Except it's not really true. The sugar is identical. Most processed foods that contain less fiber contain more fat. Fat has a similar effect on sugar digestion like fiber. The only way your assertion would make sense would be comparing a specific fruit to it's equivalent fruit juice.
  • socalkay
    socalkay Posts: 746 Member
    edited December 2014
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    Fructose in fruit is good for you (within your calorie goal if you are losing weight). Fructose in the form of corn syrup that is added to foods is not good for you.
    Why is fructose bad for you?
  • wonderfullymadebyhim
    wonderfullymadebyhim Posts: 170 Member
    edited December 2014
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    Because I am insulin resistant, struggle with central obesity, crave sugars unnaturally, deal with mild PCOS, so I choose to limit my intake of sugar to berries, tomatoes, and avocados. Rest assured, I get plenty of nutrients out of my low starch vege intake. It has helped me tremendously with weight loss and I think it does for many other people in this type of situation, but there are many others that deal just fine with high sugar fruits. You have to make that determination for yourself.
  • ballardf
    ballardf Posts: 55 Member
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    At first I used fruit as a replacement for sugary snacks and desserts. Now, I eat fruit because I love the taste and the health benefits. I am also a type 2 diabetic and in total control of my blood sugar levels.
    I love having blueberries or strawberries with some lite whipped cream as a dessert or between meal snack. Also enjoy it with my oatmeal for breakfast!
  • johnnylakis
    johnnylakis Posts: 812 Member
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    Fruit is low in calories and is safe for diabetics if they stop eating processed sugars.
  • DeWoSa
    DeWoSa Posts: 496 Member
    edited December 2014
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    elphie754 wrote: »

    And how is added sugar different from other sugar? How is the molecular make up any different?

    I was at a talk several years ago about the manufacture of drugs. A university professor was giving a talk about how he's teaching his freshmen students to manufacture drugs at their bench blah blah blah something important about research and development or something. I don't know.

    Anyhow, at one point, he talked about how atoms attach themselves to other atoms, and how even though you might have the exact same atoms -- three hydrogens and two oxygens, say -- they might not attach in the same way.

    One the one hand you might get OHOHH but on the other hand you might get HOHOH.

    That's my example, by the way, and it might not be a real thing, so please don't let my example be the sticking point -- the point here is that the atoms don't always attach in the same way even though the molecular ingredients are the same.

    He said the problem with this is the side effects from the drug. The brand drug works just fine, but the generic drug has one molecule attaching at a different point along the chain, and bam, you are giving birth to babies with no spine.

    Every time I hear someone ask "how is added sugar different from other sugar?" I think of that lecture.

    (Here's a bit of marketing literature from Roche Labs that also explains the process, but in terms of sugar chains as part of their cancer drug development -- the section "Feverish search for robust processes.")
  • GeeWillickers
    GeeWillickers Posts: 85 Member
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    The only weightloss enemy to a healthy individual with no medical conditions is making excuses and not taking responsibility for your choices plus decisions.
  • Kalikel
    Kalikel Posts: 9,626 Member
    edited December 2014
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    The OSE ending means "sugar":

    Fructose is "a fruit sugar"
    Galactose is "a milk sugar"
    Maltose is "sugar you buy at the mall" (no. I joke. It is a real thing, a product of starch digestion by amylase, but not at all important to someone dieting.)
    Etc. Many sugars.

    Your body can absolutely tell the difference between all the different sugars and (assuming you're healthy) can break them all down (well, most - we don't break down cellulose ["fiber"] , we just poop it out, but the body knows what to do with it.) People often say their body cannot tell the difference and I'm not quibbling over it, but people with healthy bodies have bodies that can tell the difference.

    In the end after the digestive system does it's job and subcontracts some of the work to liver, you have a bunch of glucose, which can be used for energy now or stored (as glycogen or in fat tissue) for use later.

    I really don't see why anyone dieting would give a hairy rat's *kitten* about different sugars and whether or not their body could tell the difference, etc.
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
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    Kalikel wrote: »
    I really hope people who can have fruit won't give it up because it has sugar in it. You NEED sugar! You can't live without it. Your brain runs on it. If you really and truly didn't take in any, your body would make it's own. Sugar is THAT important. You cannot get sugar out of your body even if you try. So, don't try. :)
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    Re fruit in winter vs. summer, I really noticed due to logging that I eat FAR more fruit in the summer (I was never over my sugar in February through April, and over constantly in June through September). I'm eating less again--I just love local summer fruit so much.

    I'm definitely going to go look for cherries and at least pick up some pears.
    I eat more fresh in the summer. Winter means frozen berries, which are still good, but very tart. I have to add blueberries and blackberries or I can't even eat the others. They also ooze as they thaw. I crumble my Nature Valley Crunchy Granola Apple Crisp bars (I swear I don't work for them) into the mix and it just looks like slop. But they granola soaks up the juicy ooze and OMG, it's all so good!!!

    I just had a Honeycrisp Apple. :)

    Oh, I'm totally with you on fruit and sugar.

    Just bought my pears and some Rainer cherries from far far away, as that was all they had. I eat blueberries and raspberries all winter and we still have lots of apples, but it's just not the same. I need to figure out what to do with the tons of cranberries I still have, too.
  • Kalikel
    Kalikel Posts: 9,626 Member
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    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    Kalikel wrote: »
    I really hope people who can have fruit won't give it up because it has sugar in it. You NEED sugar! You can't live without it. Your brain runs on it. If you really and truly didn't take in any, your body would make it's own. Sugar is THAT important. You cannot get sugar out of your body even if you try. So, don't try. :)
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    Re fruit in winter vs. summer, I really noticed due to logging that I eat FAR more fruit in the summer (I was never over my sugar in February through April, and over constantly in June through September). I'm eating less again--I just love local summer fruit so much.

    I'm definitely going to go look for cherries and at least pick up some pears.
    I eat more fresh in the summer. Winter means frozen berries, which are still good, but very tart. I have to add blueberries and blackberries or I can't even eat the others. They also ooze as they thaw. I crumble my Nature Valley Crunchy Granola Apple Crisp bars (I swear I don't work for them) into the mix and it just looks like slop. But they granola soaks up the juicy ooze and OMG, it's all so good!!!

    I just had a Honeycrisp Apple. :)

    Oh, I'm totally with you on fruit and sugar.

    Just bought my pears and some Rainer cherries from far far away, as that was all they had. I eat blueberries and raspberries all winter and we still have lots of apples, but it's just not the same. I need to figure out what to do with the tons of cranberries I still have, too.

    Dry ice and a quick overnight. ;) I've had my fill on cranberries for a while. :)
  • themedalist
    themedalist Posts: 3,215 Member
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    Quoting my MFP friend Jen, "Nobody's overweight because they ate too much produce".
  • tigersword
    tigersword Posts: 8,059 Member
    edited December 2014
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    Kalikel wrote: »
    The OSE ending means "sugar":

    Fructose is "a fruit sugar"
    Galactose is "a milk sugar"
    Maltose is "sugar you buy at the mall" (no. I joke. It is a real thing, a product of starch digestion by amylase, but not at all important to someone dieting.)
    Etc. Many sugars.

    Your body can absolutely tell the difference between all the different sugars and (assuming you're healthy) can break them all down (well, most - we don't break down cellulose ["fiber"] , we just poop it out, but the body knows what to do with it.) People often say their body cannot tell the difference and I'm not quibbling over it, but people with healthy bodies have bodies that can tell the difference.

    In the end after the digestive system does it's job and subcontracts some of the work to liver, you have a bunch of glucose, which can be used for energy now or stored (as glycogen or in fat tissue) for use later.

    I really don't see why anyone dieting would give a hairy rat's *kitten* about different sugars and whether or not their body could tell the difference, etc.

    When people say the body can't tell the difference, we don't mean it can't tell the difference between different sugar molecules. We mean that the body cannot and does not distinguish between fructose molecules in an Apple vs fructose molecules in a candy bar.

    Some people (the antisugar crowd) seem to have this oddly illogical idea that the human body digests fructose in a completely different manner depending on which specific food you consume it in. Fructose was an example, they believe that about every type of sugar.
  • tigersword
    tigersword Posts: 8,059 Member
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    elphie754 wrote: »

    And how is added sugar different from other sugar? How is the molecular make up any different?

    I was at a talk several years ago about the manufacture of drugs. A university professor was giving a talk about how he's teaching his freshmen students to manufacture drugs at their bench blah blah blah something important about research and development or something. I don't know.

    Anyhow, at one point, he talked about how atoms attach themselves to other atoms, and how even though you might have the exact same atoms -- three hydrogens and two oxygens, say -- they might not attach in the same way.

    One the one hand you might get OHOHH but on the other hand you might get HOHOH.

    That's my example, by the way, and it might not be a real thing, so please don't let my example be the sticking point -- the point here is that the atoms don't always attach in the same way even though the molecular ingredients are the same.

    He said the problem with this is the side effects from the drug. The brand drug works just fine, but the generic drug has one molecule attaching at a different point along the chain, and bam, you are giving birth to babies with no spine.

    Every time I hear someone ask "how is added sugar different from other sugar?" I think of that lecture.

    (Here's a bit of marketing literature from Roche Labs that also explains the process, but in terms of sugar chains as part of their cancer drug development -- the section "Feverish search for robust processes.")
    This would make some sense of the added sugar was artificially created in a lab, but it isn't. It's harvested from sugar cane, sugar beets, or corn. Physically, molecularly, chemically, they are the exact same sugars found in natural sources. So your example doesn't work at all.
  • Lounmoun
    Lounmoun Posts: 8,423 Member
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    I've always believed that anything from the earth is a good food to have. But I am always hearing that sugar is the enemy with weight loss and this INCLUDES fruit. Is this the truth? I just don't see how natural sugars from the earth could really be that bad for you. I am confused on this matter.


    I don't feel that foods with sugar are enemies. Most vegetables also contain some sugar. It is all just food. If it fits your nutrition goals then eat it.
    I feel that eating fruit is great. Fruit has vitamins, minerals, fiber, and tastes good.