Any out there on meds that make you gain weight?

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Replies

  • PammieSuzyQ
    PammieSuzyQ Posts: 100 Member
    elphie754 wrote: »

    Oh really?

    I have tried my best not to respond to this thread, but have to respond to this.

    I was put on medication that is very well known for "weight gain." It was for mental illness. Antidepressants and mood stabilizers. I was put on them 4 years ago. The first few months I was on them, I lost 30 lbs. my dr was very concerned. Here I was being prescribed meds known to cause significant weight gain, and I was losing. She thought I was being untruthful about my bulimia habits.

    What happened? Not having manic episodes, I had stopped self medicating. Cutting the alcohol out dropped my cals and thus led to weight loss. I never experienced weight gain with any if the meds.

    I was seeing a nutritionist because of the history of an eating disorder. She flat out told me that the meds themselves do lot cause weight gain. It is the change in appetite that causes you to eat more and thus gain weight.

    Honestly- yes, I think some people use this as an excuse. Same as when they try to claim they are addicted to food. They want it to be something else than their fault. It is easier to blame other things. That is just human nature.

    On and maybe the general public still has a stigma about mental health, but it is decreasing in stigma in the health field. Now more than ever, they have realized that they need to treat the mental health of a patient as seriously as the physical health. I work in healthcare. I see dozens of PTs a week, many on some form of psychiatric medication (area I work in has a lot of poverty and this the issues that come with it).


    I am sorry, but take some responsibility for yourself. Yes, your medication may make you feel more hungry, but you decide if you are going to eat XY and z, not the medication. Increased appetite is a side effect, gaining weight is what happens if you give into that side effect.

    This is YOUR experience, it does not follow that it is EVERYBODY'S experience just because. Does everyone have your exact body, metabolism, brain chemistry? Do they all respond to depression in EXACTLY the same way that YOU DO? Do they all respond to the same medication in EXACTLY the same fashion that you do? I think not.

    When everyone is exactly like you, then your words will have merit.

    You take care of yourself honey, you seem awfully pleased with the job your are doing so far. Leave others alone.

  • elphie754
    elphie754 Posts: 7,574 Member
    elphie754 wrote: »

    Oh really?

    I have tried my best not to respond to this thread, but have to respond to this.

    I was put on medication that is very well known for "weight gain." It was for mental illness. Antidepressants and mood stabilizers. I was put on them 4 years ago. The first few months I was on them, I lost 30 lbs. my dr was very concerned. Here I was being prescribed meds known to cause significant weight gain, and I was losing. She thought I was being untruthful about my bulimia habits.

    What happened? Not having manic episodes, I had stopped self medicating. Cutting the alcohol out dropped my cals and thus led to weight loss. I never experienced weight gain with any if the meds.

    I was seeing a nutritionist because of the history of an eating disorder. She flat out told me that the meds themselves do lot cause weight gain. It is the change in appetite that causes you to eat more and thus gain weight.

    Honestly- yes, I think some people use this as an excuse. Same as when they try to claim they are addicted to food. They want it to be something else than their fault. It is easier to blame other things. That is just human nature.

    On and maybe the general public still has a stigma about mental health, but it is decreasing in stigma in the health field. Now more than ever, they have realized that they need to treat the mental health of a patient as seriously as the physical health. I work in healthcare. I see dozens of PTs a week, many on some form of psychiatric medication (area I work in has a lot of poverty and this the issues that come with it).


    I am sorry, but take some responsibility for yourself. Yes, your medication may make you feel more hungry, but you decide if you are going to eat XY and z, not the medication. Increased appetite is a side effect, gaining weight is what happens if you give into that side effect.

    This is YOUR experience, it does not follow that it is EVERYBODY'S experience just because. Does everyone have your exact body, metabolism, brain chemistry? Do they all respond to depression in EXACTLY the same way that YOU DO? Do they all respond to the same medication in EXACTLY the same fashion that you do? I think not.

    When everyone is exactly like you, then your words will have merit.

    You take care of yourself honey, you seem awfully pleased with the job your are doing so far. Leave others alone.

    Leave others alone? Yeah, no, sorry. I will NOT stand by and watch people pay others on the back and say "it okay, it's not your fault. We can blame x". Yeah, personal responsibility is hard, and many people try to put the blame elsewhere.

    And did you bother to read? The experience was the same, it was what I did that changed the outcome. I didn't magically lose weight because I processed the medication differently. I lost the weight because I didn't give into the increased appetite. My body processed the med the same way other people do.
  • azulvioleta6
    azulvioleta6 Posts: 4,169 Member
    I think that we are talking about lots of different kinds of drugs which all have different mechanisms. Someone taking an antidepressant is going to be in a completely different situation than someone taking insulin, for example. Individuals can also react very differently to the same drug--in ways that are purely physiological. Prednisone is a good example of this--some people hang onto fluid like crazy and get moon-faced, others do not.

    Lumping all of these different types of situations together and making judgments about whether or not those challenges can be overcome by sheer willpower...well, it's not a very effective discussion.
  • PammieSuzyQ
    PammieSuzyQ Posts: 100 Member
    Thank You azulvioleta6!!! *applause* So tired of the judges here lining up to take a swing.

    I brook no problem with anyone saying, "this was my experience, or this is how I handled it". But when others call everyone else who does not share their experience lazy, and say they are making excuses simply because their bodies did not do what theirs did? That is, as an old English saying goes, beyond the pale. It's rude, it's name calling, it's childish and it's unhelpful. All that these people do is pat themselves on the back. Apparently the only way they can lift themselves up, is by knocking others down. I remain unimpressed as usual. They are the same as they were in high school.
  • I don't know if this will help anyone, but it is something I do now and then to maintain if I am unwell and can't eat right.

    I have 2 days where I eat normal, then 3rd day will reduce calories to under 800, then back to normal for next 2 days, then another day 800 or less, and always take a multi vit if you don't think your getting your full vit/mineral requirements.

    I find it helps with my water retention, also lets my digestion get rid of old food from past couple of days.

    As for meds and weight gain, I guess both those who say yes and no are both right.

    Technically the medication itself doesnt actually put the weight on you, it is the chain reaction of emotions, physical and psychological differences that can make your body do different things.

    It's like, I was on a medication for past 4 years, and was on maximum dose.
    Next thing, I get a letter off doctor saying stop medication immediately, as it can cause a fatal heart attack.

    I was 100% fine on it

    Other meds like opiates, they can make your digestion slow up drastically as they seriously slow down your bowel movements, they can make you feel hungrier than normal (Munchies like pot gives ya), also cause massive water retention.

    Not in everyone but in a high majority of people. (Me being one of them)

    So if your one of the unlucky ones that get the side effects, then as long as you weigh and log everything, try to adjust your diet accordingly.

    But if the weight is more serious to you than the complaint your getting the meds for, then talk to your doctor, and hound them till they listen.
  • jmaidan
    jmaidan Posts: 93 Member
    I feel for you, I gained 80lbs in under a year after starting a course of meds. Still working if off!
  • MrM27 wrote: »
    Hily93 wrote: »
    bretttania wrote: »
    Just joined today and was gonna ask same thing, I'm on 30mg antidepressants and no matter how much I diet I put Weight on, had a suspicion it was my meds causing it.

    Hi, many anti depressants cause weight gain, it what got me here in the first place :smile:

    I'm still blown away that you post a thread with the question then spend the whole thread giving out your answer to the question.

    Welcome_To_The_Internet.jpg
  • PammieSuzyQ
    PammieSuzyQ Posts: 100 Member
    Sunglasses, that is perfect!
  • retrolina
    retrolina Posts: 14 Member
    Do all of you who believe that it's the meds that are to blame realise, that if that were true, we could solve starvation worldwide? Bam! A drug with no calories that cause you to gain weight without having to eat more! Imagine the lives that could be saved in Africa! Magic (*)
  • Nony_Mouse
    Nony_Mouse Posts: 5,646 Member
    MrM27 wrote: »
    Medication might affect the appetite causing you to overeat but medication alone is not directly responsible for gaining fat.

    Guess my doctor doesn't know what he's talking about when he says the medication I've just come off would have slowed down my metabolism then...
  • Julslilly1
    Julslilly1 Posts: 8 Member
    MrM27 wrote: »
    _Ben wrote: »
    Pharmacist here. OP Im not seeing in this thread specifically what you are taking (possibly missed it) but if you want to send me a PM, there may be an alternative medication that might work a bit better for you.

    Also for those who say medications can or cant cause weight loss, you're simply wrong. Medications can alter your metabolism, water retention, salt/electrolyte retention, etc. If anyone would like, Id be more than happy to explain in further detail

    So if they alter your metabolism and lower your TDEE would the fat gain be from the meds directly or is it from a reduction in TDEE and eating above that?

    Also, yes, please explain in further detail with supporting evidence.

    If I hit you over the head with a hammer, just hypothetically of course, since I'm not a violent person, would the pain be from being hit in the head with a hammer, or from the inflammation caused by the burst blood vessels and fibers under the skin?

    Sometimes people talk in shorthand. It's easier to say, "This medication caused weight gain," than "This medication caused my metabolism to slow which resulted in unknowingly overeating which resulted in weight gain."

    If you want to fix the problem then that is a very important distinction.

    If I take a drug and then gain weight I could say that the drug caused weight gain. I have to take that drug so there is nothing I can do about the weight gain. That is wrong.

    If someone tells me the drug can not cause weight gain but it does alter my appetite or cause me to be less active. If I eat more calories than I burn as a result THAT is what causes the weight gain. Then I know how to fix the problem. Adjust calories intake or increase calorie output. It simple even if its not easy.

    The drug did not cause the weight gain, too many calories cause the weight gain.


    It's simple, really?

    Riddle me this…

    I gained 111 lbs within 3 years on AD's all while following a strict diet given by a registered dietician, counting calories, AND being a competitive gymnast who trained 5 times a week 3 hours each practice. If you know anything about gymnastics, we are pushed to our limit every time we train. It's a brutal sport. There's a reason it's one of the top most dangerous sports.

    I wasn't eating more calories. I was eating less calories than I did before starting AD's. I wasn't inactive. I was more active than I was before starting AD's.

    So no, your whole "altering appetite, being less active, and not adjusting calorie intake" didn't apply to me.

    Do NOT try to tell me the medications didn't cause my weight gain when I was 95-97 freaking pounds my ENTIRE life before beginning AD's (oh and did I mention I couldn't gain a single pound no matter how much I tried until I began AD's… That's not a coincidence)

    What you are saying is impossible to the known laws of physics on this planet.

    You can not eat less calories than you burn and gain weight other than water retention.

    Weight is the gravitational force on your mass. If you want to change your weight you have to change your mass.

    In physics there is something called the Mass Energy Equivalence. Energy=Mass and they change in relation to each other. They equation for this E=mc2. A guy named Einstein wrote that. Maybe you have heard of him.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass–energy_equivalence

    To increase the mass of a system, in this case your body, you have to have a surplus of energy. To decrease it you have to have a deficit of energy. Most people use the calorie as the unit of measurement to calculate intake and expenditure. Or we simplify it as CICO. CI<CO=weight loss. CI>CO=weight gain. Simple.

    So now you can see that if you burned more than you ate you can not have added mass and increased your weight.


    You're right. I'm wrong. My medical team are liars. I'm just making it all up because I wanted to gain 100+ pounds. *eyeroll*

    Its not me trying to be right. I was trying to explain why we are saying that medications and medical issues can change energy expenditures but can not cause the actual weight gain. That comes from eating to much.

    The medication can change your appetite or make you want to move less or retain water but it cant make you gain weight by itself.

    If people understand the difference then they can manage their weight better.


    Yes you are trying and not listening to anyone else. My cancer med absolutely slows my metabolism thus weight gain. I work harder to combat that, and I don't need a misinformed know it all to tell me differently. =)

    Yes ... I agree it chemically slows down your metabolism. Been told by my entire team of doctors.
  • tinascar2015
    tinascar2015 Posts: 413 Member
    I gained 36 pounds in 12 months when I was taking an antidepressant and occasional Xanax. I had been losing weight without trying previous to taking the meds, due to a serious anxiiety disorder. My doctor said the drugs didn't cause the weight gain and handed me a xeroxed 1200 calorie generic diet plan from the 1970s and then told me to come back when I had lost some weight.

    Great, I thought, a fat shaming doctor. She picked up where my mother had left off. I left, tore the diet into pieces, and never went back to her.

    Then I signed on with a psych doctor who prescribed a different med, Zoloft, and I gained another 24 pounds on that. Sure, I was eating way too much, and a lot of junk, but my head just wasn't able to clear itself of the fog that had me compulsively eating. The meds made me lethargic and I slept a lot, often during the day. I could barely move some days.

    When I decided my anxiety and depression were under control and was sick of being so sleepy all the time, the psych doctor weaned me off the meds and I've now been fine for three years. But really really fat. I had developed so many terrible habits that it took me three years to flip the switch in my head and get back on track, with 60 of the 110 pounds I needed to lose having piled on in just five years.

    So I don't know if these medications have a physiological effect that cause weight gain, or if they affect your brain in such a way that you eat more and exercise less, but I firmly believe they can cause a person to gain a lot of weight.
  • JessicaBowlby
    JessicaBowlby Posts: 14 Member
    I gained 10 pounds since starting Zoloft. I am at the maximum dosage. With my depression and anxiety kicked into high gear I lost 15, & then started the meds. Eating the same things, exercising more, and still gained. Just depends on the person.