How can I get past my plateau?

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13

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  • PeachyCarol
    PeachyCarol Posts: 8,029 Member
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    Cortelli wrote: »
    urloved33 wrote: »
    chelseag2h wrote: »
    Like what? Jumping rope?
    urloved33 wrote: »
    Do something that shocks your system.

    You can fast, you can lift considerable more weight than you usually do...high weight low reps....you can - yes - jump rope if you usually do not. You can run if you usually do not.

    I do the weight thing. It gets me moving every time...

    I have found that by introducing a new variable into the overall equation -- especially a new exercise routine of any sort -- I am more likely to see unexpected changes.

    Especially with new exercise, our seldom-used or infrequently-stressed muscles tend to require more water for repair / recovery, and that water weight makes it look like we're gaining weight (we are!). But the thing is, it is water weight, not fat -- still not encouraging to those who don't understand it and are focused on scale weight. In fact, introducing a new exercise approach can result in scale weight gains and discouragement if one isn't expecting and ready for it.

    OP - two weeks is frustrating but not really enough time to get overly anxious about it. As you've already indicated you plan to do, get a scale and weigh out your solids whenever you're at home and can do so. Inaccurate logging, despite the best of intentions and a healthy dose of OCD, is the cause of much confusion to judge by these boards.

    Yup. Every time my trainer has me do something different, the scale moves up.

    I'm not concerned about it, because I know the science, but... yup.

  • Cortelli
    Cortelli Posts: 1,369 Member
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    MrM27 wrote: »
    Cortelli wrote: »
    urloved33 wrote: »
    chelseag2h wrote: »
    Like what? Jumping rope?
    urloved33 wrote: »
    Do something that shocks your system.

    You can fast, you can lift considerable more weight than you usually do...high weight low reps....you can - yes - jump rope if you usually do not. You can run if you usually do not.

    I do the weight thing. It gets me moving every time...

    I have found that by introducing a new variable into the overall equation -- especially a new exercise routine of any sort -- I am more likely to see unexpected changes.

    Especially with new exercise, our seldom-used or infrequently-stressed muscles tend to require more water for repair / recovery, and that water weight makes it look like we're gaining weight (we are!). But the thing is, it is water weight, not fat -- still not encouraging to those who don't understand it and are focused on scale weight. In fact, introducing a new exercise approach can result in scale weight gains and discouragement if one isn't expecting and ready for it.

    OP - two weeks is frustrating but not really enough time to get overly anxious about it. As you've already indicated you plan to do, get a scale and weigh out your solids whenever you're at home and can do so. Inaccurate logging, despite the best of intentions and a healthy dose of OCD, is the cause of much confusion to judge by these boards.

    You better knock it off with all the explanations filled with actual science and stuff. Only raw emotions allowed in here.

    Dammit. I never get this posting *kitten* right.
  • jkal1979
    jkal1979 Posts: 1,896 Member
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    urloved33 wrote: »
    Do something that shocks your system.

    The only problem that I have with this advice is that it doesn't get to the root of what the problem really is. Most of the time it's a logging issue. I've seen people take this vague advice without fixing their logging issues before only to come back a month or two later and say that the scale is still not moving.
  • isulo_kura
    isulo_kura Posts: 818 Member
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    urloved33 wrote: »
    Do something that shocks your system.

    What like a scary movie? Any recommendations?
  • macgurlnet
    macgurlnet Posts: 1,946 Member
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    chelseag2h wrote: »
    Now I see the grams on the peanut butter. I will go buy a digital scale tomorrow and start tracking more accurately.
    I certainly appreciate all the great comments and help! Thank you!

    Like others have said - two weeks really isn't a plateau. If anything, it's a stall - you may have lost fat but have some excess water weight at present that is masking the loss.

    4-6 weeks of just about no movement is probably a plateau.

    Measuring your food on a scale will (mostly) eliminate logging inaccuracies, so that will help.

    I wish you all the best! Good luck!

    ~Lyssa
  • mrsjatty
    mrsjatty Posts: 95 Member
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    [/quote]

    I have found that by introducing a new variable into the overall equation -- especially a new exercise routine of any sort -- I am more likely to see unexpected changes.

    Especially with new exercise, our seldom-used or infrequently-stressed muscles tend to require more water for repair / recovery, and that water weight makes it look like we're gaining weight (we are!). But the thing is, it is water weight, not fat -- still not encouraging to those who don't understand it and are focused on scale weight. In fact, introducing a new exercise approach can result in scale weight gains and discouragement if one isn't expecting and ready for it.

    OP - two weeks is frustrating but not really enough time to get overly anxious about it. As you've already indicated you plan to do, get a scale and weigh out your solids whenever you're at home and can do so. Inaccurate logging, despite the best of intentions and a healthy dose of OCD, is the cause of much confusion to judge by these boards. [/quote]

    Thank you, this is the first time I have read something like that, it makes perfect sense and explains why now that I have started C25K the scales have not been moving and have actually gone up a bit, but I can tell stuff is happening because my body shape is changing, fascinating stuff. How did I get to 42 with no real understanding of how my body works...

  • atypicalsmith
    atypicalsmith Posts: 2,742 Member
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    chelseag2h wrote: »
    I am 5'5", started an 1100 calorie diet on February 12, 2015. My beginning weight was 201 and now I'm at 184.4 but I have hit a plateau. Anything that goes in my mouth I add to MFP religiously! I also have a FitBit synced to MFP and average between 7k to 10k steps a day. I mostly eat All-Bran cereal with Non-Fat vanilla yogurt, tuna fish, cantaloupe, cucumbers, carrots, Smart Ones Thin Crust Pizza (310 cal), Popped Wheat Thins, Laughing Cow Light Swiss Cheese, things like that. I get most of my steps by using my gazelle for 30-45 minutes twice a day. I am a stay at home mom so most of my exercise is from the gazelle.
    I take a multi-vitamin and 600mg Potassium daily. And since I eat the All-Bran I make sure I eat at least 100% of my daily fiber. I'm not 'regular', never have been. Which is why I make sure to eat enough fiber.
    But I stopped losing weight. Help!!

    You lost nearly 17 pounds in about eight weeks. Over two pounds a week. Of course you're going to plateau. It's the body's way of telling you to give up and stuff yourself with pizza, beer, and ice cream again because a nutritious diet doesn't work.
  • barbecuesauce
    barbecuesauce Posts: 1,771 Member
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    Cortelli wrote: »
    urloved33 wrote: »
    chelseag2h wrote: »
    Like what? Jumping rope?
    urloved33 wrote: »
    Do something that shocks your system.

    You can fast, you can lift considerable more weight than you usually do...high weight low reps....you can - yes - jump rope if you usually do not. You can run if you usually do not.

    I do the weight thing. It gets me moving every time...

    I have found that by introducing a new variable into the overall equation -- especially a new exercise routine of any sort -- I am more likely to see unexpected changes.

    Especially with new exercise, our seldom-used or infrequently-stressed muscles tend to require more water for repair / recovery, and that water weight makes it look like we're gaining weight (we are!). But the thing is, it is water weight, not fat -- still not encouraging to those who don't understand it and are focused on scale weight. In fact, introducing a new exercise approach can result in scale weight gains and discouragement if one isn't expecting and ready for it.

    OP - two weeks is frustrating but not really enough time to get overly anxious about it. As you've already indicated you plan to do, get a scale and weigh out your solids whenever you're at home and can do so. Inaccurate logging, despite the best of intentions and a healthy dose of OCD, is the cause of much confusion to judge by these boards.

    I agree. My last "plateau" (using OP's 2-week definition) occurred when I began running. I've experienced lulls for changing up my strength training too.

    And OP, COOK! I know the recipe builder can be a pain, but you could cut even more calories and have more filling meals than frozen dinners.
  • BruceHedtke
    BruceHedtke Posts: 358 Member
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    Solid food will have nutrition info on the labels in grams in addition to the spoons/cups. It would make live less confusing for a lot of people if they only had the grams and NOT the spoons/cups.

    Amen.
  • nancyjay__
    nancyjay__ Posts: 310 Member
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    I personally don't log in the calories I've burned because they vary way too much and there are too many variables. Maybe you are going over in cals burned eating them back and thus your problem?
  • nancyjay__
    nancyjay__ Posts: 310 Member
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    segacs wrote: »
    2 weeks isn't a plateau. Just keep at it.

    And this!
  • chelseag2h
    chelseag2h Posts: 20 Member
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    I've been going at it for over 7 months now and have lost 50 pounds. But in the past month, I've only lost 3.2 pounds. Should I increase my protein and lower my carbs? Or increase my steps from 10k to 15k? I still eat 1100 calories (50% carbs, 20% protein, and 30% fat). I still weigh everything I eat, and drink at least 70 ozs of water daily. I've gone from a size 18 to size 8-10. But would really like to lose an additional 20 pounds. What should I change? Or should I change anything?
    Although I did start using hand weights and ankle weights as well as bike riding every other day just this past week.
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 48,691 Member
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    chelseag2h wrote: »
    Oops. Missed a few questions. My plateau has lasted 2 weeks. My doctor recommended 1200 calories a day and I opted for 1100 calories since most people eat 10% more calories than they think they do. I read that somewhere. And I would like to lose 2 pounds a week instead of just 1.
    NOT a plateau. A plateau is 6 weeks or more of no weight movement if food intake and exercise are consistent. Any break in that consistency (like eating more one day than another) wouldn't make it a plateau. You are possibly in a stall and not uncommon for a couple of weeks or more.
    But if you've done the same routine for a long time now, the body as adapted and uses calories conservatively as needed. Try upping your intensity of exercise (higher resistance or faster).

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

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  • Liftng4Lis
    Liftng4Lis Posts: 15,150 Member
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    Way to go on your loss! 50 pounds is awesome. 3.5 pounds in a month is still almost a pound a week. Excellent!
  • A_New_Creation
    A_New_Creation Posts: 169 Member
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    Good work on your progress so far. Do you use supplements? For me, the type of protein powder I was using stagnated my weight loss.
  • bendyourkneekatie
    bendyourkneekatie Posts: 696 Member
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    Just adding my experience, after the first couple of months of rapid (too rapid in my case) loss, I *never* see movement on the scales until TOM hits. Then 4 weeks of fluctuating on and above that number, then TOM and whoosh.
  • Christine_72
    Christine_72 Posts: 16,049 Member
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    jnm934 wrote: »
    Good work on your progress so far. Do you use supplements? For me, the type of protein powder I was using stagnated my weight loss.

    @jnm934 How do you your protein powder stagnated your weight loss? Just curious :smile:

  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 48,691 Member
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    jnm934 wrote: »
    Good work on your progress so far. Do you use supplements? For me, the type of protein powder I was using stagnated my weight loss.

    @jnm934 How do you your protein powder stagnated your weight loss? Just curious :smile:
    Soy versus whey?

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png