University Studies on Rapid Weight Loss Diets

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2819400/Why-crash-diets-GOOD-New-research-turns-accepted-dieting-wisdom-head.html

Another theory is that yo-yo dieting can slow the metabolism over time. The thinking behind this is that every time you lose weight, you lose muscle. When you regain weight, you put on fat, which burns calories more slowly.

But Michael Mosley says this is a myth. 'There's nothing wrong with losing weight rapidly, as long as you have adequate protein and nutrients, and exercise to maintain muscle,' he says. And weight loss, even if not maintained, can benefit the heart, a team at University College London reported earlier this year.
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Replies

  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 41,876 Member
    Oh yeah...the dailymail...
  • elphie754
    elphie754 Posts: 7,574 Member
    zmusic wrote: »
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2819400/Why-crash-diets-GOOD-New-research-turns-accepted-dieting-wisdom-head.html

    Another theory is that yo-yo dieting can slow the metabolism over time. The thinking behind this is that every time you lose weight, you lose muscle. When you regain weight, you put on fat, which burns calories more slowly.

    But Michael Mosley says this is a myth. 'There's nothing wrong with losing weight rapidly, as long as you have adequate protein and nutrients, and exercise to maintain muscle,' he says. And weight loss, even if not maintained, can benefit the heart, a team at University College London reported earlier this year.

    Not always true. People who want to increase their muscle mass typically eat over maintenance ( spelling? Lol) to bulk/gain weight.


  • snickerscharlie
    snickerscharlie Posts: 8,578 Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    Oh yeah...the dailymail...
    Always a credible source.

    LMAO.

  • elphie754
    elphie754 Posts: 7,574 Member
    I didn't read the article but I Ihave a feeling they are refering to the morbidly obese (> 350 lbs) who need to lose weight somewhat quickly to save their life.
  • brower47
    brower47 Posts: 16,356 Member
    The Daily Mail... I can't wait for the next post from the National Enquirer. I hear Bat Boy is giving out great diet advice these days.
  • stevencloser
    stevencloser Posts: 8,911 Member
    zmusic wrote: »
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2819400/Why-crash-diets-GOOD-New-research-turns-accepted-dieting-wisdom-head.html

    Another theory is that yo-yo dieting can slow the metabolism over time. The thinking behind this is that every time you lose weight, you lose muscle. When you regain weight, you put on fat, which burns calories more slowly.

    But Michael Mosley says this is a myth. 'There's nothing wrong with losing weight rapidly, as long as you have adequate protein and nutrients, and exercise to maintain muscle,' he says. And weight loss, even if not maintained, can benefit the heart, a team at University College London reported earlier this year.

    Well yeah, that's exactly the problem, a lot of people don't do that.
  • SideSteel
    SideSteel Posts: 11,068 Member
  • SideSteel
    SideSteel Posts: 11,068 Member
    SideSteel wrote: »

    I'm kicking some opinions around in my head about this, but I'd like to see the full text and I also have to decide how much confirmation bias I have going on in my head =)
  • stevencloser
    stevencloser Posts: 8,911 Member
    zmusic wrote: »
    http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/2014/10/16/crash-diets-rapid-weight-loss-better-gradual-weight-loss-study


    Contrary to most research that recommends long term weight loss diets, the University of Melbourne paper, published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, has suggested that ‘crash diets’ may be more effective

    Seen it. The study is linked in the article. The study doesn't even really say crash diets may be more effective. It just showed that both fast and slow weight losers regained their original weight at the same relative rate.
    So one is more restrictive calories wise but it's over faster while the other is less restrictive calories wise but takes longer.

    Also I don't think it took LBM retention into account, which is kinda important when wanting to assess if one is better than the other in my opinion.
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 48,486 Member
    Crash diets can work no doubt. The concern I would have for anyone doing it though is getting in essentials and having enough calories if they intend to exercise along with it. The article didn't mention any of these people exercising or doing any physical activity.
    The other is sustainability after. Severe restriction can mentally be taxing and it's not uncommon for people who have abstained from foods they like for a long time, to completely binge (a natural behavior).

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
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  • nosebag1212
    nosebag1212 Posts: 621 Member
    edited April 2015
    daily mail is a *kitten* paper but this guy is actually right here, case in point: protein sparing modified fasts with weight lifting 2x per week can drop weight off you at an alarming rate while maintaining lbm, but they are brutal and not recommended for most people and can lead to binging and eating disorders
  • Mr_Knight
    Mr_Knight Posts: 9,532 Member
    edited April 2015
    Done right (which most don't) rapid fat loss protocols (the non-idiotic ones) are the bomb. Lean mass retention and accelerated fat oxidation FTW.

    Not for everybody, though. They can be tough mentally. But for those who prefer stair step approach (cycling periods of rapid fat loss with periods of maintenance) over a gradual incline...yeah....

    Too bad we can't really talk about them on MFP.

    :drinker:

    Love this quote:

    "The idea that losing weight slowly is better for you is an old wives' tale," says Professor Nick Finer, consultant endocrinologist and an expert in obesity at University College London Hospitals.
  • elphie754
    elphie754 Posts: 7,574 Member
    edited April 2015

    Too bad we can't really talk about them on MFP.
    Huh? What are you referring to that you can talk about here?



  • Mr_Knight
    Mr_Knight Posts: 9,532 Member
    Another money quote...
    'The people I've worked with who have kept the weight off have become Weight Watchers group leaders, triathlon runners, gym instructors - it's become a big part of who they are.'

    This is consistent with my experience - I've personally come to believe that the people most likely to succeed in maintenance are the ones who find a reason stronger than the number on the scale or the fit of their pants to keep the weight off.
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    elphie754 wrote: »

    Too bad we can't really talk about them on MFP.
    Huh? What are you referring to that you can talk about here?



    VLCD?