Do any of you have Bipolar or Depression?

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  • gvj777
    gvj777 Posts: 15 Member
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  • sweetpotatofries123
    sweetpotatofries123 Posts: 99 Member
    edited May 2015
    SkpTex66 wrote: »
    I struggle with depression and anxiety. I take 20mg of citalopram a day. I went off it for about a year or so, and started really struggling again. So, I am back on it. I find I get hungrier and have to be careful about eating too much, and make sure I am exercising. I would rather take medication than suffer all the time. I have never been diagnosed with bi-polar, so I can't comment on that one. Peace and be well!!

    I also struggle with depression and anxiety. (I take Wellbutrin and Brintellix and an occasional Klonopin for a panic attack). I find my hunger tends to correlate to my mood. Like if I'm angry or anxious, I automatically crave a Coke. When I'm content I don't have much of an appetite. I only recently started exercising seriously and I find it very difficult to lose weight even when I am eating well and not giving in to my emotional numbing urges. Tracking what I eat has been very helpful in spotting these connections so I can identify them and try to change.

    Just curious - It also seems like I'm always sick with a migraine or allergies or something and that makes it much harder to exercise. Does anyone else have this problem in addition to the mental illness? Honestly, I sometimes feel like a freak because its very difficult to find others who can relate.
    - especially at the gym :(

  • sweetpotatofries123
    sweetpotatofries123 Posts: 99 Member
    i use sun therapy...open shades every morning and *must* spend time in the sun every day or at the very least turn on all lights in the house if it's raining. light therapy helps me to get out of bed on a depression day. i have to force myself to get out with friends because i tend toward hibernation. i am in therapy once per week and couldn't make it w/o her. i take sleeping pills and have to sleep at least 9 hours per night or i cannot function. if i sleep less, i will start toward mania and can easily go 4-5 days with no sleep. it's a very slippery slope. i also have to watch alcohol intake. by the way, none of these things work w/o my meds. i am completely and totally dependent on them and i am fine with it. i have an alarm on my phone, 6:00 p.m. every.single.day.of.my.life. my life and the life of my husband, parents and children depend upon my taking them.
    [/quote]

    Did you ever try a light box? I was just wondering how well they work when I stumbled upon your post.

  • xstephnz
    xstephnz Posts: 278 Member
    Also, there's nothing wrong with being dependent on medication. Diabetics are dependent on insulin to cope with their condition, we can be dependent on ADs to cope with ours.

    True. I wish I could go off my medications, but my family would kill me. I'd at least like to try.
  • xstephnz
    xstephnz Posts: 278 Member
    Exercising is a form of medication for depression. So if she wants to be a little more specific in her post, then we can all be sure that she's referring to antidepressants. Until then, madhu has a great medication for depression and was right to share.

    But medication isn't a form of exercise that will make you fat (hopefully).
  • xstephnz
    xstephnz Posts: 278 Member
    madhu1981 wrote: »
    few instances i do get depressed its part of life - medication is a 10km run under 60 mins - i feel good

    Please, and with due respect, "getting depressed" and "having depression" are two entirely, entirely, entirely different things. You can be 'depressed' about something- a life event, someone dying, etc. Depression (clinical) is a medical condition. And you can't outrun it, no matter how far you run in an hour.

    Thank you <3
  • xstephnz
    xstephnz Posts: 278 Member
    xstephnz wrote: »
    Personally, I find a combination of things help (but I have *Bi*polar, not just depression). Working out, having fish oil supplements, meeting up with a friend twice a week, sitting in the sun, eating well, writing about everything that is bothering me in extreme detail, venting, listening to angry/sad music, finding stuff to laugh at and getting enough sleep makes me a lot less depressed. I am wondering how much this stuff would have helped before I got on the right medications?

    i use sun therapy...open shades every morning and *must* spend time in the sun every day or at the very least turn on all lights in the house if it's raining. light therapy helps me to get out of bed on a depression day. i have to force myself to get out with friends because i tend toward hibernation. i am in therapy once per week and couldn't make it w/o her. i take sleeping pills and have to sleep at least 9 hours per night or i cannot function. if i sleep less, i will start toward mania and can easily go 4-5 days with no sleep. it's a very slippery slope. i also have to watch alcohol intake. by the way, none of these things work w/o my meds. i am completely and totally dependent on them and i am fine with it. i have an alarm on my phone, 6:00 p.m. every.single.day.of.my.life. my life and the life of my husband, parents and children depend upon my taking them.

    I wonder if that would work for me? I heard sun therapy can make people with Bipolar manic? although, it probably wouldn't hurt if I'm already on medications.
  • xstephnz
    xstephnz Posts: 278 Member

    Also, there's nothing wrong with being dependent on medication. Diabetics are dependent on insulin to cope with their condition, we can be dependent on ADs to cope with ours.

    i completely and totally agree with this, although it took me literally about 13+ years to come to that conclusion. if i had cancer, i would gladly accept drugs and meds. if i had a broken arm, i would take a cast and pain meds. so it's true of having a mental illness. meds are there for us to take. i cannot believe the difference in my life before and after. it is the difference between my husband coming home from work and finding me crying in the shower and him coming home and finding me cooking dinner. i KNOW i am dependent upon meds, but that's ok. i am at peace with that. i am thankful they are available, i'm thankful i have the financial means by which to purchase them, because some of them can be very expensive.

    I remember from a young age, after a deep sense of shame about having depression. I was made to feel by the media, my parents and other kids that having depression and needing medication made you ''different'' ''a freak'' etc and that I would never be able to lead a normal life. Now I've learnt that being on medication is just replacing brain chemicals and puts me on an even playing field with everyone else. I hope people don't still discriminate against mental illness and medications. It doesn't make you special or different, maybe just more in touch with your negative emotions?
  • xstephnz
    xstephnz Posts: 278 Member
    Yes, I am diagnosed bi polar.. I just took myself off of Lithium, topermate, giodon, & Xanax . I've been on pretty much every medication.. Jan 13, 2015 I got off medication because I've gained 80 pounds, I replace medications with positive things if I'm angry I go to the gym & box .. If I'm sad I go for a run & listen to positive music & if I'm happy & full of energy my family gets annoyed & sends me to the gym to drain my energy lol :) hope you get better :)

    Do you have type 1 or type 2? I have type 1, so I have been told that I will probably never be able to go off my medications. (unless Science finds a cure or something in the next 70 years)
  • xstephnz
    xstephnz Posts: 278 Member
    DaniHeat wrote: »
    I was diagnosed with depression at 14, more along the self loathing side, I was a 14st 12 year old and I got bullied a lot, it stuck with me, I'm 18 now and I wear shirts that are 3 sizes too big because I hate people seeing my real shape, it got me into a rut when I lost the weight and I've slowly gained it back. There are days when I just don't want to move which hinders my weight loss and activity but I try my best to overcome anything thrown at me because I know I'm better than that. I'm too high risk to take medication so I wouldn't know about that but I'm just sharing my story and I'm more than happy to be there if anyone needs to vent or just to talk! :)

    I can gurantee you will look better if you wear clothes that are fitted properly and in your size. I looked better at 110 kilos than I did at 100 because of the way I dressed. Learn to embrace the things you love about your body, and hide the flaws. For example, I try to cover my arms, and not wear anything thats tight around my stomach.
  • xstephnz
    xstephnz Posts: 278 Member

    Also, there's nothing wrong with being dependent on medication. Diabetics are dependent on insulin to cope with their condition, we can be dependent on ADs to cope with ours.

    i completely and totally agree with this, although it took me literally about 13+ years to come to that conclusion. if i had cancer, i would gladly accept drugs and meds. if i had a broken arm, i would take a cast and pain meds. so it's true of having a mental illness. meds are there for us to take. i cannot believe the difference in my life before and after. it is the difference between my husband coming home from work and finding me crying in the shower and him coming home and finding me cooking dinner. i KNOW i am dependent upon meds, but that's ok. i am at peace with that. i am thankful they are available, i'm thankful i have the financial means by which to purchase them, because some of them can be very expensive.

    Yup, exactly! We are lucky enough to live in a world where these things are available and I am lucky enough to live in a country with entirely, 100% free health care. Why not take advantage of it? What's the point in suffering through depression if we have means to cope?

    Where do you live? I had free Healthcare in the UK. It costs a little bit in New Zealand but is mostly subsitised.
  • WeddedBliss1992
    WeddedBliss1992 Posts: 414 Member
    edited May 2015
    xstephnz wrote: »

    Also, there's nothing wrong with being dependent on medication. Diabetics are dependent on insulin to cope with their condition, we can be dependent on ADs to cope with ours.

    i completely and totally agree with this, although it took me literally about 13+ years to come to that conclusion. if i had cancer, i would gladly accept drugs and meds. if i had a broken arm, i would take a cast and pain meds. so it's true of having a mental illness. meds are there for us to take. i cannot believe the difference in my life before and after. it is the difference between my husband coming home from work and finding me crying in the shower and him coming home and finding me cooking dinner. i KNOW i am dependent upon meds, but that's ok. i am at peace with that. i am thankful they are available, i'm thankful i have the financial means by which to purchase them, because some of them can be very expensive.

    I remember from a young age, after a deep sense of shame about having depression. I was made to feel by the media, my parents and other kids that having depression and needing medication made you ''different'' ''a freak'' etc and that I would never be able to lead a normal life. Now I've learnt that being on medication is just replacing brain chemicals and puts me on an even playing field with everyone else. I hope people don't still discriminate against mental illness and medications. It doesn't make you special or different, maybe just more in touch with your negative emotions?

    i am type 1 and yes, will likely be medicated (or at least have the need to be medicated) for the rest of my life; or at least the foreseeable future. what i try to do is take it day by day and not worry about if i'll be on meds in 20 years. will i be on meds today? yes. tomorrow? yes. that's all i need to know.

    there are only a few people who know because in the past, when i have confided in people, i have lost friendships. either (1) they think i'm just depressed and need to get over it or (2) they think i'm nuts and don't want to have to deal with my issues. either way, i don't need those types of people in my life.

    therapy helps with the shame. would you feel shame if you had breast cancer? you can't help it if you have a diagnosis of bipolar. it is something one cannot control, except through therapy and meds, etc. a diagnosis, in my opinion, was fantastic. it gave a name to what i had been living with most of my life. i was 31 when i was diagnosed and had been struggling since i was a teen. i finally had a label and a name for what was wrong with me. i could put everything into a neat box and my life made sense. i'm not saying life is a breeze now or everything is easy...i'm just saying for me, diagnosis helped. alot.

    i'm older than you, and with age *hopefully* comes wisdom. i have been blessed with a very understanding and caring husband and we have 3 children. i lead a somewhat normal life under the circumstances. i have worked at some points in my life when i have been able, although not working at this time. do what you can when you can. take your meds. see a therapist. get outside. trust your instincts. don't beat yourself up. love yourself. don't give up.

  • WeddedBliss1992
    WeddedBliss1992 Posts: 414 Member
    i use sun therapy...open shades every morning and *must* spend time in the sun every day or at the very least turn on all lights in the house if it's raining. light therapy helps me to get out of bed on a depression day. i have to force myself to get out with friends because i tend toward hibernation. i am in therapy once per week and couldn't make it w/o her. i take sleeping pills and have to sleep at least 9 hours per night or i cannot function. if i sleep less, i will start toward mania and can easily go 4-5 days with no sleep. it's a very slippery slope. i also have to watch alcohol intake. by the way, none of these things work w/o my meds. i am completely and totally dependent on them and i am fine with it. i have an alarm on my phone, 6:00 p.m. every.single.day.of.my.life. my life and the life of my husband, parents and children depend upon my taking them.

    Did you ever try a light box? I was just wondering how well they work when I stumbled upon your post.

    [/quote]

    i have not tried a light box, but i live in Texas USA and being in the south, we get ALOT of sun. even in winter, we have loads of natural sun. if you live in the north or where you have long dark winters, light boxes might be a good choice.

    in answer to the OP's question, yes extraordinarily large amounts of sun can trigger manias. so can drinking caffeine or alcohol. so can staying up too late or not getting enough rest. each person needs to keep a list of triggers so that they can try to control as best they can. for me, at this point, dipping into depression is far more of a concern than rising to mania, so i'm not as concerned about that at this time. there are times when i can sense mania might be more of an issue, so i will have to adjust accordingly.

  • WeddedBliss1992
    WeddedBliss1992 Posts: 414 Member
    LAMCDylan wrote: »
    taking a holistic approach; dieting, exercise, socializing, gardening, getting sun, educating myself on depression and anxiety, acceptance, living simple and not in competition with others, removing toxic people from my life, removing myself from hostile environments and other tools helped me put the most of it behind me

    i really love your examples of holistic approaches to mental health. i too use these along with my meds. (minus the socializing, i'm not good at that one. LOL)

    education is a great one, hasn't really been mentioned much. gardening is excellent and i have been doing alot of that of late. it is nice to have hands in earth, life, rich soil, growing veggies or even plants. seeing something come of nothing is really nice. i especially love your removing toxic people. i have done this and it is VERY difficult to do because you are sometimes left with no one. we moved 50 miles to start a new life and i have found this to be a great way to meet new people and to start over. i realize not everyone can do this, but if possible, it's been trans-formative for me.

    one last thing, please - no one stop taking meds w/o dr's approval and help. some meds are physiologically addictive and require a dr's supervision. and i can tell you from exeprience, none of the holistic and natural approaches work for me w/o meds.
  • moesis
    moesis Posts: 874 Member
    At first I was on 1500mg of Depakote. I didn't like the photosensativity or weight gain so I stopped taking them. Trust me, keep taking your meds. Going off and on has some pretty unpleasant effects.

    Currently I am on Lamictal, no weight gain, no photosensativity.
  • LAMCDylan
    LAMCDylan Posts: 1,215 Member
    LAMCDylan wrote: »
    taking a holistic approach; dieting, exercise, socializing, gardening, getting sun, educating myself on depression and anxiety, acceptance, living simple and not in competition with others, removing toxic people from my life, removing myself from hostile environments and other tools helped me put the most of it behind me

    i really love your examples of holistic approaches to mental health. i too use these along with my meds. (minus the socializing, i'm not good at that one. LOL)

    education is a great one, hasn't really been mentioned much. gardening is excellent and i have been doing alot of that of late. it is nice to have hands in earth, life, rich soil, growing veggies or even plants. seeing something come of nothing is really nice. i especially love your removing toxic people. i have done this and it is VERY difficult to do because you are sometimes left with no one. we moved 50 miles to start a new life and i have found this to be a great way to meet new people and to start over. i realize not everyone can do this, but if possible, it's been trans-formative for me.

    one last thing, please - no one stop taking meds w/o dr's approval and help. some meds are physiologically addictive and require a dr's supervision. and i can tell you from exeprience, none of the holistic and natural approaches work for me w/o meds.

    I used to suck at socializing too. But a lot of it is tied your self esteem and self confidence. Also understanding that you are not the center of everyones' universe helps a lot too. Ultimately, if you are an independent person who has needs you have to overcome the shyness and uncomfortableness around people. Working a job, going to school, shopping etc are things that need to get done. In the end, all the random people don't matter. If you let it get the best of you it puts a big limit on your life. This really frustrated me and made me sad. I still consider myself pretty shy and I do get socially anxious still (it all depends on the situation) but I have made big improvements. Everyone has strengths and weaknesses though so there is no need to really beat yourself up over not being strong or fearless all the time. Life can still be lived and enjoyed while not having everything perfect. In fact, having perfection in life is not really obtainable nor required. If you can learn to accept this life gets easier.