Why do most fastfood items have less calories internaionally?

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13

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  • BurnWithBarn2015
    BurnWithBarn2015 Posts: 1,026 Member
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    yeah i think it is all together...the portion size, preparation etc
    Laws about what can be added to food and not.

    It all plays its part.
  • yarwell
    yarwell Posts: 10,477 Member
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    Big Mac & Medium Fries :-

    UK: 845 kcal, 42g fat, 84g carbohydrate, 9.6g sugars, 7.2g fibre, 30g protein, 2.9g salt

    US: 870 kcal, 44g fat, 91g Total carbohydrate, 9g sugars, 7g fiber, 28g protein, 2.9g salt
  • Machka9
    Machka9 Posts: 25,140 Member
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    yarwell wrote: »
    Big Mac & Medium Fries :-

    UK: 845 kcal, 42g fat, 84g carbohydrate, 9.6g sugars, 7.2g fibre, 30g protein, 2.9g salt

    US: 870 kcal, 44g fat, 91g Total carbohydrate, 9g sugars, 7g fiber, 28g protein, 2.9g salt

    Big Mac:

    AU: 493 kcal

    Medium Fries:

    AU: 368 kcal

    Total: 861 kcal

    https://mcdonalds.com.au/sites/mcdonalds.com.au/files/Aust-main-menu-21-October-2015.pdf

  • yarwell
    yarwell Posts: 10,477 Member
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    But for better comparing than in grams Dutch "magere jogart is 33 calories per 100 gram
    the lowest in the US is 49 gram per 100 calories

    that doesn't make too much sense TBH.

    Perhaps you can find us Dutch and US milk on the same basis for comparison, rather than a 19% difference in quantity analysed.
  • BurnWithBarn2015
    BurnWithBarn2015 Posts: 1,026 Member
    edited December 2015
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    100 gram of Mountain High Fat free yogurt
    p09hymcy0sty.png


    And here 100 gram of the Dutch Magere Campina Yogurt ( so Fat free Yogurt)
    j8qjqnxrx3vp.png

    Eiwit = Protein
    Koolhydraten = Carbs
    Vet = Fat
    Natrium = Salt


  • BurnWithBarn2015
    BurnWithBarn2015 Posts: 1,026 Member
    edited December 2015
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    Its not that difficult. There is less protein in it than the US one and less sugar. that is what makes the difference in calories.

    Milk is not just milk meat is not just meat
    It depends what the cow has eaten in its life
    Full fat (blue grass) on hay its whole life or corn.
    You get a totally different product

    Grass is not the same everywhere the sun hours a day will vary and will decide how much sugar and other nutrition are produced in products
    So for field grown vegetables and fruits.
  • BurnWithBarn2015
    BurnWithBarn2015 Posts: 1,026 Member
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    Here another good example
    100 gram of Chicken breast filet

    So yes both 100 gram first the US
    x0mkqaf7q35j.png


    Now the Dutch one same amount but 65 calories LESS!
    w98b47saqzzx.png


    So were did MacDonalds get there meat from in Holland to make chicken nuggets lol
    I know which one i would chose

  • Merkavar
    Merkavar Posts: 3,082 Member
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    yarwell wrote: »
    Merkavar wrote: »
    My guess is size and I believe some countries don't put sugar in their bread.

    So is everything American sweetened with sugar?

    No, HFCS is more popular but if you include that then many foods aim for the optimum enjoyment combo of sugar, fat and salt.

    HFCS is sugar isn't it? The f being the important word?

    Fructose right?
  • candylilacs
    candylilacs Posts: 614 Member
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    High Fructose Corn Syrup.
  • Colorscheme
    Colorscheme Posts: 1,179 Member
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    Merkavar wrote: »
    yarwell wrote: »
    Merkavar wrote: »
    My guess is size and I believe some countries don't put sugar in their bread.

    So is everything American sweetened with sugar?

    No, HFCS is more popular but if you include that then many foods aim for the optimum enjoyment combo of sugar, fat and salt.

    HFCS is sugar isn't it? The f being the important word?

    Fructose right?

    High Fructose Corn Syrup is subsidized by the government. Sugar and corn is, which means the industry puts it in everything because it's incredibly cheap. It's the government that wants this, and unfortunately us Americans are accustomed to it.

    Plus salt, sugar and fat has been proven to be addicting.

    I don't agree with it, so I do my part by forgoing anything with HFCS in it. There's no reason that normal sandwich bread needs to be sweetened with sugar. In fact, the books I have on bread baking often use no sugar at all.
  • 3dogsrunning
    3dogsrunning Posts: 27,167 Member
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    Merkavar wrote: »
    yarwell wrote: »
    Merkavar wrote: »
    My guess is size and I believe some countries don't put sugar in their bread.

    So is everything American sweetened with sugar?

    No, HFCS is more popular but if you include that then many foods aim for the optimum enjoyment combo of sugar, fat and salt.

    HFCS is sugar isn't it? The f being the important word?

    Fructose right?

    High Fructose Corn Syrup is subsidized by the government. Sugar and corn is, which means the industry puts it in everything because it's incredibly cheap. It's the government that wants this, and unfortunately us Americans are accustomed to it.

    Plus salt, sugar and fat has been proven to be addicting.

    I don't agree with it, so I do my part by forgoing anything with HFCS in it. There's no reason that normal sandwich bread needs to be sweetened with sugar. In fact, the books I have on bread baking often use no sugar at all.

    It has?
  • Colorscheme
    Colorscheme Posts: 1,179 Member
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    Merkavar wrote: »
    yarwell wrote: »
    Merkavar wrote: »
    My guess is size and I believe some countries don't put sugar in their bread.

    So is everything American sweetened with sugar?

    No, HFCS is more popular but if you include that then many foods aim for the optimum enjoyment combo of sugar, fat and salt.

    HFCS is sugar isn't it? The f being the important word?

    Fructose right?

    High Fructose Corn Syrup is subsidized by the government. Sugar and corn is, which means the industry puts it in everything because it's incredibly cheap. It's the government that wants this, and unfortunately us Americans are accustomed to it.

    Plus salt, sugar and fat has been proven to be addicting.

    I don't agree with it, so I do my part by forgoing anything with HFCS in it. There's no reason that normal sandwich bread needs to be sweetened with sugar. In fact, the books I have on bread baking often use no sugar at all.

    It has?

    Yep, it's called food science. http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/food-cravings-engineered-by-industry-1.1395225
  • yarwell
    yarwell Posts: 10,477 Member
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    Merkavar wrote: »
    yarwell wrote: »
    Merkavar wrote: »
    My guess is size and I believe some countries don't put sugar in their bread.

    So is everything American sweetened with sugar?

    No, HFCS is more popular but if you include that then many foods aim for the optimum enjoyment combo of sugar, fat and salt.

    HFCS is sugar isn't it? The f being the important word?

    Fructose right?

    HFCS contains sugarS and is produced by the corn / starch industry. Sugar is a crystalline product made by the sugar industry. Not the same thing. Liquid vs solid, etc.

    There's a lot of glucose in HFCS as well as the F.
  • yarwell
    yarwell Posts: 10,477 Member
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    So were did MacDonalds get there meat from in Holland to make chicken nuggets lol
    I know which one i would chose

    I would choose the one with a lot more protein and fat, more nutrients. Oops, that's the American one.
  • _Terrapin_
    _Terrapin_ Posts: 4,301 Member
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    Merkavar wrote: »
    yarwell wrote: »
    Merkavar wrote: »
    My guess is size and I believe some countries don't put sugar in their bread.

    So is everything American sweetened with sugar?

    No, HFCS is more popular but if you include that then many foods aim for the optimum enjoyment combo of sugar, fat and salt.

    HFCS is sugar isn't it? The f being the important word?

    Fructose right?

    High Fructose Corn Syrup is subsidized by the government. Sugar and corn is, which means the industry puts it in everything because it's incredibly cheap. It's the government that wants this, and unfortunately us Americans are accustomed to it.

    Plus salt, sugar and fat has been proven to be addicting.

    I don't agree with it, so I do my part by forgoing anything with HFCS in it. There's no reason that normal sandwich bread needs to be sweetened with sugar. In fact, the books I have on bread baking often use no sugar at all.

    So, by your logic, we shouldn't consume items the farmers grow where they receive a subsidy? I wonder how many food items aren't grown with a subsidy? Hmmm....

  • paperpudding
    paperpudding Posts: 9,072 Member
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    kuranda10 wrote: »
    What cracks me up is I have to argue with them to give me more than 4 ice cubes. Guys you're saving product if you give me what I want.
    Do Aussies really rather a full cup of warm soda?

    I don't know what incident prompted this question - but No, Australians do not drink warm soda( soft drink as we call it)

  • paperpudding
    paperpudding Posts: 9,072 Member
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    As a visitor to the US I would say portion size for sure but also I couldn't get over how sweet normal commercially made bread is in the US. It tastes like dessert buns or something. I had to go to a village market and buy some home made sourdough bread in order to not feel like I was having some revolting dessert salad sandwich. So maybe like said above its the HFCS that seems to go into everything?

    My Daughter lived in America and she noticed this too - the bread tasted noticeably sweeter than bread in Australia.

  • kuranda10
    kuranda10 Posts: 593 Member
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    kuranda10 wrote: »
    What cracks me up is I have to argue with them to give me more than 4 ice cubes. Guys you're saving product if you give me what I want.
    Do Aussies really rather a full cup of warm soda?

    I don't know what incident prompted this question - but No, Australians do not drink warm soda( soft drink as we call it)

    I am Australian and I have to ask for more ice every single time I am at a fast food place. And I have seen Aussies return a cup to the counter because there was too much ice and not enough "cool drink" as they call it.
  • paperpudding
    paperpudding Posts: 9,072 Member
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    That's interesting kuranda - perhaps you just Like more ice than most people.
    I've never had to ask for more ice or known anyone here to drink soft drink warm - some like it with no ice but still cold, but most have ice.
    Incidentally I've never known it to be called 'cool drink' either - always soft drink.
  • amusedmonkey
    amusedmonkey Posts: 10,330 Member
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    That's interesting kuranda - perhaps you just Like more ice than most people.
    I've never had to ask for more ice or known anyone here to drink soft drink warm - some like it with no ice but still cold, but most have ice.
    Incidentally I've never known it to be called 'cool drink' either - always soft drink.

    Ice dilutes the drink and makes it watery. That's why I opt for a cold drink to start with, and only 2-3 ice cubes maximum if any.