1,000 Calories in One Workout?

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  • rankinsect
    rankinsect Posts: 2,238 Member
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    To put it in perspective: Olympic athletes in endurance events typically burn something on the order of 1200 calories per hour. Are you exercising at an intensity that surpasses the best athletes on the planet? Probably not.
  • lorrpb
    lorrpb Posts: 11,464 Member
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    Roger that. He's good with the workout and the form, he definitely pushes me, but when he answered that I was so skeptical... I'll see if there is a better one around.

    If you like the workouts then stick ewth him for that and go elsewhere for nutrition advice. I wouldn't dump him over a calorie burn question unless it was affecting your training in some other way.
  • robertw486
    robertw486 Posts: 2,392 Member
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    Glad so many people corrected this. I bookmarked and I was wondering how ANY trainer could be that out of touch with realistic calorie counts.

    But life would be great if those numbers were true. At 2000 calories per hour burn rates, I could easily eat to my hearts desire at buffets every night, and still control my weight easily. A person could out exercise a crappy diet. What a fantasy!
  • DizzyMissIzzy
    DizzyMissIzzy Posts: 168 Member
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    lorrpb wrote: »
    Roger that. He's good with the workout and the form, he definitely pushes me, but when he answered that I was so skeptical... I'll see if there is a better one around.

    If you like the workouts then stick ewth him for that and go elsewhere for nutrition advice. I wouldn't dump him over a calorie burn question unless it was affecting your training in some other way.

    This is very reasonable, thank you! You guys are all so helpful, it's amazing.
  • Larissa_NY
    Larissa_NY Posts: 495 Member
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    lorrpb wrote: »
    Roger that. He's good with the workout and the form, he definitely pushes me, but when he answered that I was so skeptical... I'll see if there is a better one around.

    If you like the workouts then stick ewth him for that and go elsewhere for nutrition advice. I wouldn't dump him over a calorie burn question unless it was affecting your training in some other way.

    I don't know. A person who tries to sell you a gallon vat of snake oil in one area probably isn't too trustworthy in others.
  • SingingSingleTracker
    SingingSingleTracker Posts: 1,866 Member
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    robertw486 wrote: »
    But life would be great if those numbers were true. At 2000 calories per hour burn rates, I could easily eat to my hearts desire at buffets every night, and still control my weight easily. A person could out exercise a crappy diet. What a fantasy!

    This!

    We'd all be able to easily out exercise a really crappy diet at that burn rate - that is if we could sustain the effort required for more than 5 minutes.

    Heck, even Tour de France racers burn only about 1000 calories per hour x 4 hours each stage for 3 consecutive weeks. And at that rate, they can't eat enough calories to prevent losing weight during the 3 week race (on average, each rider loses 10 pounds during those 3 weeks even though they begin the race already lean and mean).
  • PAtinCO
    PAtinCO Posts: 129 Member
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    You might burn 1000 calories climbing a Colorado 14er, but not lifting for 30 minutes.
  • Working2BLean
    Working2BLean Posts: 386 Member
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    An extra 0 on there!

  • wilsoncl6
    wilsoncl6 Posts: 1,280 Member
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    Hold on a sec, before we pass judgment, it depends on what he meant by the 1,000 calories. Was that the 1,000 calories burned during the exercise itself or total extra calories burned then and to be burned later (recovery). There is a good article on what's called EPOC (Excess Post exercise Oxygen Consumption). That's where the body has to expend more energy than normal to repair damage done during intense workout to get back to a complete resting state. The more intense the workout, the more damage done, the more energy required to complete repairs. This can be seen in people that have undergone surgery, recovering from illness or at the highest recorded levels of EPOC, burn victims. However, it is unlikely, even with EPOC, OP would have burned and will burn 1,000 calories as EPOC cannot grant that much of an increase in overall caloric drain in combination with the calories burned during lifting. Is it possible that OP was doing some sort of HIIT routine where the lifts were the break sessions and she was doing some sort of cardio in between? OP: Where you only lifting for the entire 30 minute duration?
  • DizzyMissIzzy
    DizzyMissIzzy Posts: 168 Member
    edited December 2015
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    wilsoncl6 wrote: »
    Is it possible that OP was doing some sort of HIIT routine where the lifts were the break sessions and she was doing some sort of cardio in between? OP: Where you only lifting for the entire 30 minute duration?

    Thanks for your response.

    No, we were lifting continuously with the only break being the time it took to get to the next machine. Every single day we've been going to failure on almost every set, and the weight is way more than I can do on my own (after the first few reps he has to guide the weight) which is extremely taxing, yesterday I think my body was so desperate for recovery I fell asleep on the couch at 5 and every time I woke up I couldn't stay awake so I ended up going to bed and sleeping until 6am... I am still very new and learning a lot about things. I've lost a lot of trust in my trainer now though, which has taken a massive hit on my confidence and motivation in what I'm doing.
  • beemerphile1
    beemerphile1 Posts: 1,710 Member
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    ...Every single day we've been going to failure on almost every rep, and the weight is way more than I can do on my own (after the first few reps he has to guide the weight) which is extremely taxing....

    I fear your trainer is pushing you toward an injury. The trainer needs to push you beyond what you think your capabilities are but this sounds excessive.

    If you are a beginner the trainers primary job is to teach you proper technique to avoid injury. I'm guessing this is some poorly trained young stud that thinks everyone should be lifting heavy and working toward a competition.
  • wilsoncl6
    wilsoncl6 Posts: 1,280 Member
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    wilsoncl6 wrote: »
    Is it possible that OP was doing some sort of HIIT routine where the lifts were the break sessions and she was doing some sort of cardio in between? OP: Where you only lifting for the entire 30 minute duration?

    Thanks for your response.

    No, we were lifting continuously with the only break being the time it took to get to the next machine. Every single day we've been going to failure on almost every rep, and the weight is way more than I can do on my own (after the first few reps he has to guide the weight) which is extremely taxing, yesterday I think my body was so desperate for recovery I fell asleep on the couch at 5 and every time I woke up I couldn't stay awake so I ended up going to bed and sleeping until 6am... I am still very new and learning a lot about things. I've lost a lot of trust in my trainer now though, which has taken a massive hit on my confidence and motivation in what I'm doing.

    Yeah, then he's likely overestimating how many calories you've burned by say.... a lot and the workout plan that you have (going past failure) is likely to get you injured. I do believe in going to failure on lifts but not on set 2 of the exercise unless you're lifting heavy and two sets is all you're going to be doing. Failure should occur on the last reps of your planned set. If you don't reach failure at your last set, then increase your weight. It's called progressive loading. If you're just starting out, the most important thing is to learn good form and get down the basic lifts. He might be a little too aggressive but you know yourself and it all depends on how aggressive you personally want to be. I don't think requiring a lot of sleep for recovery is necessarily a bad thing, especially for someone that's new. Your body will need time to catch up with the stresses. You will just want to watch out for excessive soreness or sharp or persistent pains that don't go away. Just have a talk with your trainer about your concerns and come up with a plan of attack together. It might be helpful to know how much experience this guy has.
  • DizzyMissIzzy
    DizzyMissIzzy Posts: 168 Member
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    @wilsoncl06 I always appreciate your well thought out responses!

    I did a lot of working out on my own the 6 months prior to hiring this trainer, so I'm not *SO* new, but I am new to really sitting down and aggressively going after the results that before I didn't think were possible.

    I've lifted at my comfort zone 4-5x a week before the trainer and every day i'd do 30 min of cardio burning 400-450 calories. I saw limited results though because perhaps I wasn't pushing myself past where I already was comfortable at? Or hadn't changed my diet much? I always eat healthy but now that I'm actually counting macros and everything my diet really has changed. I had lost inches (2 pant sizes) but no weight, and only 4% body fat (32 down to 28% now).

  • ryry_
    ryry_ Posts: 4,966 Member
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    If you doing continuous weightlifting with little no rest between and working more towards your maximum heartrate I could see something in the 300-400 range maybe but 1000 seems rather excessive.

    All this uncertainty in calorie counts always makes me appreciate the simplicity of just using a TDEE and adjusting from there.
  • DizzyMissIzzy
    DizzyMissIzzy Posts: 168 Member
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    ryry62685 wrote: »
    If you doing continuous weightlifting with little no rest between and working more towards your maximum heartrate I could see something in the 300-400 range maybe but 1000 seems rather excessive.

    All this uncertainty in calorie counts always makes me appreciate the simplicity of just using a TDEE and adjusting from there.

    Forgive my noobishness, what's a TDEE?
  • wilsoncl6
    wilsoncl6 Posts: 1,280 Member
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    TDEE is the amount calories your body burns in a 24 hour period, sleeping, working, exercising, playing and even digesting food! The IIFYM TDEE Calculator is designed to give you your exact TDEE based on a few key factors (BMR + TOTAL ENERGY EXPENDITURE).

    You can go here to use the calculator to figure out yours. http://iifym.com/tdee-calculator/
  • tulips_and_tea
    tulips_and_tea Posts: 5,719 Member
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    wilsoncl6 wrote: »
    Is it possible that OP was doing some sort of HIIT routine where the lifts were the break sessions and she was doing some sort of cardio in between? OP: Where you only lifting for the entire 30 minute duration?

    Thanks for your response.

    No, we were lifting continuously with the only break being the time it took to get to the next machine. Every single day we've been going to failure on almost every set, and the weight is way more than I can do on my own (after the first few reps he has to guide the weight) which is extremely taxing, yesterday I think my body was so desperate for recovery I fell asleep on the couch at 5 and every time I woke up I couldn't stay awake so I ended up going to bed and sleeping until 6am... I am still very new and learning a lot about things. I've lost a lot of trust in my trainer now though, which has taken a massive hit on my confidence and motivation in what I'm doing.

    Now, don't let that happen! It was just one question. Granted, the trainer should know better, but it doesn't mean you should dismiss them altogether. If you enjoy working with them, then state that you'd like to readjust your training a bit: lighter weights so that you can do more of the reps yourself. If they are willing to work with you then stick with it and keep adjusting as your progress. If they don't consider your opinion only then would I look into another trainer. Either way do not let it affect your mindset!
  • Diana_GettingFit
    Diana_GettingFit Posts: 458 Member
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    If he's helping you with the weights and showing you the correct form and you're happy with him for that then stick with him. He's there to help you with your workout. The fact he doesn't know the nutrition side so well doesn't mean he doesn't know what he's doing in the gym.
  • AnvilHead
    AnvilHead Posts: 18,343 Member
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    No, we were lifting continuously with the only break being the time it took to get to the next machine. Every single day we've been going to failure on almost every set, and the weight is way more than I can do on my own (after the first few reps he has to guide the weight) which is extremely taxing, yesterday I think my body was so desperate for recovery I fell asleep on the couch at 5 and every time I woke up I couldn't stay awake so I ended up going to bed and sleeping until 6am... I am still very new and learning a lot about things. I've lost a lot of trust in my trainer now though, which has taken a massive hit on my confidence and motivation in what I'm doing.

    Here's a question I haven't seen asked yet - how many days a week are you doing this?

    In addition to the muscle fatigue, strength training also fatigues the CNS (central nervous system). If you're not allowing for adequate recovery, progress/gains are going to be very difficult to achieve. A good training program certainly has to include progression, which means you're going to push beyond your comfort zone - but it should also include periodization and adequate recovery.
  • ryry_
    ryry_ Posts: 4,966 Member
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    ryry62685 wrote: »
    If you doing continuous weightlifting with little no rest between and working more towards your maximum heartrate I could see something in the 300-400 range maybe but 1000 seems rather excessive.

    All this uncertainty in calorie counts always makes me appreciate the simplicity of just using a TDEE and adjusting from there.

    Forgive my noobishness, what's a TDEE?

    Total Daily Energy Expenditure. Instead of having a base calorie goal and eating back our excericse calories, you would calculate your total daily calories with excercise included, and base your calorie goal off of that number and adjust up or down based on real world results. A guy put much more thought and detail into it than I can in this post.

    http://www.acaloriecounter.com/diet/calorie-maintenance-calculator-daily-calorie-requirements/