1,000 Calories in One Workout?

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  • DizzyMissIzzy
    DizzyMissIzzy Posts: 168 Member
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    AnvilHead wrote: »

    Here's a question I haven't seen asked yet - how many days a week are you doing this?

    In addition to the muscle fatigue, strength training also fatigues the CNS (central nervous system). If you're not allowing for adequate recovery, progress/gains are going to be very difficult to achieve. A good training program certainly has to include progression, which means you're going to push beyond your comfort zone - but it should also include periodization and adequate recovery.

    Lifting 4x a week and Cardio 3x a week. This week I've been lifting Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and will again today. Tuesday, Saturday and Sunday are my cardio/rest days. Tuesday was my cardio day because I'm in the military and run a cardio based PT session on that day.
  • RuNaRoUnDaFiEld
    RuNaRoUnDaFiEld Posts: 5,864 Member
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    If he's helping you with the weights and showing you the correct form and you're happy with him for that then stick with him. He's there to help you with your workout. The fact he doesn't know the nutrition side so well doesn't mean he doesn't know what he's doing in the gym.

    I would say the same if he had said he didn't know and would get back to her, it is the way he blagged it that would make me fire him on the spot!
  • MeanderingMammal
    MeanderingMammal Posts: 7,866 Member
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    wilsoncl6 wrote: »
    There is a good article on what's called EPOC (Excess Post exercise Oxygen Consumption). That's where the body has to expend more energy than normal to repair damage done during intense workout to get back to a complete resting state.

    You're still only talking about single figure percentage of net though.
  • wilsoncl6
    wilsoncl6 Posts: 1,280 Member
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    wilsoncl6 wrote: »
    There is a good article on what's called EPOC (Excess Post exercise Oxygen Consumption). That's where the body has to expend more energy than normal to repair damage done during intense workout to get back to a complete resting state.

    You're still only talking about single figure percentage of net though.

    Not really, there is the exercise phase of EPOC and the extended post exercise phase that is more likely to be created by HIIT.
  • DaddieCat
    DaddieCat Posts: 3,643 Member
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    wilsoncl6 wrote: »
    wilsoncl6 wrote: »
    There is a good article on what's called EPOC (Excess Post exercise Oxygen Consumption). That's where the body has to expend more energy than normal to repair damage done during intense workout to get back to a complete resting state.

    You're still only talking about single figure percentage of net though.

    Not really, there is the exercise phase of EPOC and the extended post exercise phase that is more likely to be created by HIIT.

    Do you have any evidence? Every study I've ever read shows that EPOC is generally grossly overestimated and usually only equates to about an extra 6-10 calories per hour, even in post exercise recovery phase. I'd be interested to see some documentation as I often end up in EPOC related conversations with other trainers I know.
  • wilsoncl6
    wilsoncl6 Posts: 1,280 Member
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    wilsoncl6 wrote: »
    wilsoncl6 wrote: »
    There is a good article on what's called EPOC (Excess Post exercise Oxygen Consumption). That's where the body has to expend more energy than normal to repair damage done during intense workout to get back to a complete resting state.

    You're still only talking about single figure percentage of net though.

    Not really, there is the exercise phase of EPOC and the extended post exercise phase that is more likely to be created by HIIT.

    Do you have any evidence? Every study I've ever read shows that EPOC is generally grossly overestimated and usually only equates to about an extra 6-10 calories per hour, even in post exercise recovery phase. I'd be interested to see some documentation as I often end up in EPOC related conversations with other trainers I know.

    I agree, most studies that I have read does state that the EPOC may only extend to an additional 6-15% of the net cost of the exercise performed (one hour = 100 calories = 6/10 calories EPOC) but that figure may need to be adjusted as many of the studies did not take rest EPOC into consideration but, either way, the extra caloric burn is negligible for any one bout and the intensity required to get to an extended EPOC state is generally not tolerable for non-athletes.

    This study: J Sports Sci. 2006 Dec;24(12):1247-64. talks about it.
  • DaddieCat
    DaddieCat Posts: 3,643 Member
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    wilsoncl6 wrote: »
    wilsoncl6 wrote: »
    wilsoncl6 wrote: »
    There is a good article on what's called EPOC (Excess Post exercise Oxygen Consumption). That's where the body has to expend more energy than normal to repair damage done during intense workout to get back to a complete resting state.

    You're still only talking about single figure percentage of net though.

    Not really, there is the exercise phase of EPOC and the extended post exercise phase that is more likely to be created by HIIT.

    Do you have any evidence? Every study I've ever read shows that EPOC is generally grossly overestimated and usually only equates to about an extra 6-10 calories per hour, even in post exercise recovery phase. I'd be interested to see some documentation as I often end up in EPOC related conversations with other trainers I know.

    I agree, most studies that I have read does state that the EPOC may only extend to an additional 6-15% of the net cost of the exercise performed (one hour = 100 calories = 6/10 calories EPOC) but that figure may need to be adjusted as many of the studies did not take rest EPOC into consideration but, either way, the extra caloric burn is negligible for any one bout and the intensity required to get to an extended EPOC state is generally not tolerable for non-athletes.

    This study: J Sports Sci. 2006 Dec;24(12):1247-64. talks about it.

    Cool... Thanks for that. I'll take a look when I'm not at work and can get away with reading for a while.
  • MeanderingMammal
    MeanderingMammal Posts: 7,866 Member
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    wilsoncl6 wrote: »
    ...the extended post exercise phase that is more likely to be created by HIIT.

    Still negligible, the most I've seen reliably are claimed to be between 6-10% of net.

    So when a HIIT session is only in the realms of 100-200 cals you're still talking negligible calorie benefit. But that's not really the point of HIIT, is it...
  • dakotababy
    dakotababy Posts: 2,406 Member
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    The only time I have EVER burnt 1000 calories was when I was obese and first started working out. I think I was like 230lbs (5'7) and incredibly out of shape. I think I was doing Turbo Jam for a little over an hour...

    I have never been able to accomplish a 1000 calorie burn since.
  • wilsoncl6
    wilsoncl6 Posts: 1,280 Member
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    wilsoncl6 wrote: »
    ...the extended post exercise phase that is more likely to be created by HIIT.

    Still negligible, the most I've seen reliably are claimed to be between 6-10% of net.

    So when a HIIT session is only in the realms of 100-200 cals you're still talking negligible calorie benefit. But that's not really the point of HIIT, is it...

    No, it's not. It's to get the highest caloric burn in the shortest amount of available time and to stimulate hypertrophy. However, I'm not completely sold on HIIT as most people can't sustain the intensity required to maximize the effects. This would probably work better for elite athletes more than your standard gym goer. To get the right HIIT effect, you'd have to exercise to the point of puking your guts out if you're doing it right.
  • wilsoncl6
    wilsoncl6 Posts: 1,280 Member
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    dakotababy wrote: »
    The only time I have EVER burnt 1000 calories was when I was obese and first started working out. I think I was like 230lbs (5'7) and incredibly out of shape. I think I was doing Turbo Jam for a little over an hour...

    I have never been able to accomplish a 1000 calorie burn since.

    1000 calories in an hour is doable under certain circumstances but you're not going to achieve it just by lifting weights. Not going to happen. I did over 1000 calories in an hour a few times when I was trying to increase my time for a half marathon I was prepping for. I was doing a 7 minute mile pace and was puking my guts out afterwards until I learned not to eat anything at least 8 hours beforehand.
  • MeanderingMammal
    MeanderingMammal Posts: 7,866 Member
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    wilsoncl6 wrote: »
    No, it's not. It's to get the highest caloric burn in the shortest amount of available time and to stimulate hypertrophy.

    Given that the warm up and cool down are likely to burn more net than the high intensity effort I'd question the value of doing it to burn calories, particularly given the recovery requirement.

    Personally I'm more interested in the VO2Max improvements that I'd get from it, but really wouldn't be trying to sell it from the calorie benefit perspective at all.
  • MeanderingMammal
    MeanderingMammal Posts: 7,866 Member
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    dakotababy wrote: »
    The only time I have EVER burnt 1000 calories was when I was obese and first started working out. I think I was like 230lbs (5'7) and incredibly out of shape. I think I was doing Turbo Jam for a little over an hour...

    I have never been able to accomplish a 1000 calorie burn since.

    fwiw it's about a 10 mi,le run for me or as upthread about a 25-30 mile cycle. So in both cases about 90-110 minutes for me.
  • wilsoncl6
    wilsoncl6 Posts: 1,280 Member
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    wilsoncl6 wrote: »
    No, it's not. It's to get the highest caloric burn in the shortest amount of available time and to stimulate hypertrophy.

    Given that the warm up and cool down are likely to burn more net than the high intensity effort I'd question the value of doing it to burn calories, particularly given the recovery requirement.

    Personally I'm more interested in the VO2Max improvements that I'd get from it, but really wouldn't be trying to sell it from the calorie benefit perspective at all.

    True, the recovery requirement negates the effectiveness but people gravitate to it that have limited time for cardio routines, are bored by steady state cardio or just want to do something different than running, riding a bike or using a cardio machine for extended periods of time. For me, I add two HIIT sessions during the week and 3 days of steady state just to break up the monotony. I'm sure my HIIT sessions aren't truly that since I'm sure I don't put forth 100% effort the entire time. Goes back to my point that most gym goers don't do the kind of intensity required to make a HIIT routine effect and I might argue that steady state provides a better calorie burn overall so caloric burn wouldn't be a good argument to make to do HIIT.
  • Azdak
    Azdak Posts: 8,281 Member
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    wilsoncl6 wrote: »
    wilsoncl6 wrote: »
    There is a good article on what's called EPOC (Excess Post exercise Oxygen Consumption). That's where the body has to expend more energy than normal to repair damage done during intense workout to get back to a complete resting state.

    You're still only talking about single figure percentage of net though.

    Not really, there is the exercise phase of EPOC and the extended post exercise phase that is more likely to be created by HIIT.

    Given that the name EPOC specifically refers to "post exercise", curious about what are calling the "exercise phase of EPOC".
  • robertw486
    robertw486 Posts: 2,392 Member
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    I think that even assuming the highest possible rates of EPOC, and a brutal HIIT routine, most people would still far significantly short of 2000 calories per hour, or 1000 for the half hour. Some below professional types might burn calories at that rate for a 1/2 hour doing certain cardio, but probably not as many doing it lifting. And even that would be a stretch.. probably a big stretch. We're talking 33+ calories per minute there. That's more along the line of HIIT level intensity for an extended period!


    If I could burn at those calorie rates on the bike I wouldn't need a car. And I'd never need help moving anything if I could do it lifting. And a big triathlon might just be part of a training day.
  • SomeNights246
    SomeNights246 Posts: 807 Member
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    Whoa. It takes me like 4 hours to burn 800 calories walking (I know because I had to once, and even then the guess is probably off given MFP's calculator is sometimes), so I somehow doubt it. Maybe he was trying to motivate you? But whatever the case, he gave a bad answer.
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 48,751 Member
    edited December 2015
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    Hey guys,

    So I've been lifting heavy with a trainer for the past week (I've been lifting for longer but I wanted to buckle down and really get some direction) and we've been doing some pretty intense workouts.

    I asked today how many calories he thinks we burn in one 30 minute session and his answer seriously floored me. He told me we burned about 1,000 calories a workout. I had been expecting something like 400-500.

    We do weights that are incredibly high for me, as in, my muscles usually end up failing before the end of at least the second set but for sure by the third, and we take little to no break in between the exercises. The exercises are all superset with others or dropsets. I'm dripping with sweat and sore for days. But 1,000 calories, is this possible? If so.... I need to eat more.

    Please let me know!
    Your trainer is obviously unknowledgeable on calorie expenditure during anaerobic exercise.

    In a 30 minute session, even if it's intense from start to finish..............maybe 250 at most unless you're really heavy in weight.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

  • Drewdizm
    Drewdizm Posts: 3 Member
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    Hey guys,

    So I've been lifting heavy with a trainer for the past week (I've been lifting for longer but I wanted to buckle down and really get some direction) and we've been doing some pretty intense workouts.

    I asked today how many calories he thinks we burn in one 30 minute session and his answer seriously floored me. He told me we burned about 1,000 calories a workout. I had been expecting something like 400-500.

    We do weights that are incredibly high for me, as in, my muscles usually end up failing before the end of at least the second set but for sure by the third, and we take little to no break in between the exercises. The exercises are all superset with others or dropsets. I'm dripping with sweat and sore for days. But 1,000 calories, is this possible? If so.... I need to eat more.

    Please let me know!
    Hey guys,

    So I've been lifting heavy with a trainer for the past week (I've been lifting for longer but I wanted to buckle down and really get some direction) and we've been doing some pretty intense workouts.

    I asked today how many calories he thinks we burn in one 30 minute session and his answer seriously floored me. He told me we burned about 1,000 calories a workout. I had been expecting something like 400-500.

    We do weights that are incredibly high for me, as in, my muscles usually end up failing before the end of at least the second set but for sure by the third, and we take little to no break in between the exercises. The exercises are all superset with others or dropsets. I'm dripping with sweat and sore for days. But 1,000 calories, is this possible? If so.... I need to eat more.

    Please let me know!