Calorie Counter

You are currently viewing the message boards in:

Interesting Studies: Probably low carb related in one way or another

2456721

Replies

  • AlabasterVerveAlabasterVerve Posts: 2,980Member Member Posts: 2,980Member Member
    Consumption of Honey, Sucrose, and High-Fructose Corn Syrup Produces Similar Metabolic Effects in Glucose-Tolerant and -Intolerant Individuals

    Conclusions: Daily intake of 50 g carbohydrate from honey, sucrose, or HFCS55 for 14 d resulted in similar effects on measures of glycemia, lipid metabolism, and inflammation. All 3 increased triglyceride (TG) concentrations in both glucose tolerance (GT) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) individuals and elevated glycemic and inflammatory responses in the latter.

    Source

    50g of added sugar daily for two weeks was enough to negatively impact health markers.
  • AlabasterVerveAlabasterVerve Posts: 2,980Member Member Posts: 2,980Member Member
    Aspirin in the Treatment of Cancer: Reductions in Metastatic Spread and in Mortality: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses of Published Studies

    Source
  • AlabasterVerveAlabasterVerve Posts: 2,980Member Member Posts: 2,980Member Member
    The long read
    The sugar conspiracy

    by Ian Leslie

    Not a study but an interesting read.

    In 1972, a British scientist sounded the alarm that sugar – and not fat – was the greatest danger to our health. But his findings were ridiculed and his reputation ruined. How did the world’s top nutrition scientists get it so wrong for so long?

    Guardian Article


    Yale Daily News on Dr. Katz (regarding the article above):

    Instructor criticized for comments
  • AlabasterVerveAlabasterVerve Posts: 2,980Member Member Posts: 2,980Member Member
  • AlabasterVerveAlabasterVerve Posts: 2,980Member Member Posts: 2,980Member Member
    The first results from NuSi's metabolic ward study were shared at ICO 2016 by Kevin Hall. In a nut shell his findings were there's no metabolic advantage to a ketogenic diet; there may be something interesting going on with appetite.

    Here's a short 13 minute interview of Kevin Hall at the conference by Yoni Freedhoff:

    Dr. Kevin Hall on NuSi first public presentation of their metabolic ears work.

    Conclusions:

    1. An inpatient controlled isocaloric low carbohydrate ketogenic diet was
    followed by small increases in energy expenditure that waned over time.

    2. Despite rapid, substantial and persistent reductions in insulin
    secretion (as assessed by 24hr C-peptide excretion) and RQ, no
    augmentation of body fat loss was observed.

    3. Our data do not support the carbohydrate insulin model predictions of
    physiologically significant increases in energy expenditure or body fat
    loss in response to an isocaloric low carbohydrate ketogenic diet.

    Some of the Q&A with Yoni Freedhoff and Kevin Hall:

    Q: I take it this has not increased your buy in for the insulin hypothesis?
    A: I think the combination of these two studies - on the metabolic side of things - basically falsify the carbohydrate insulin hypothesis.

    Q: When's the paper coming out?
    A: It was just resubmitted to the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition after a round of relatively positive reviews. So I would anticipate probably hearing something positive within the next few weeks.

    Q: Does this mean the hypothesis is now over? I suspect you would say yes.
    A: I still think there might be something interesting to say about appetite. [Appetite] was something that was measured very indirectly in this study which I'm not presenting the data yet.
  • AlabasterVerveAlabasterVerve Posts: 2,980Member Member Posts: 2,980Member Member
  • yarwellyarwell Posts: 10,573Member Member Posts: 10,573Member Member
    In a nut shell his findings were there's no metabolic advantage to a ketogenic diet; there may be something interesting going on with appetite.

    The Abstract said there was an increase in energy expenditure:

    KD-Hall-abstract.png

  • AlabasterVerveAlabasterVerve Posts: 2,980Member Member Posts: 2,980Member Member
    yarwell wrote: »
    In a nut shell his findings were there's no metabolic advantage to a ketogenic diet; there may be something interesting going on with appetite.

    The Abstract said there was an increase in energy expenditure:

    Yeah, I saw that later. Thanks for posting it, yarwell.

    I'm interested to see what people think of Hall's summary of the findings once the study is actually published. I'm sure you've seen these blog posts but maybe someone else would be interested. Michael Eades questioning Hall's conclusions and Peter at Hyperlipid showing a (possible, I assume) mechanism for a metabolic advantage:

    Contradictions and Cognitive Dissonance: The (Kevin) Hall Effect
    Uncoupling and weight loss
    edited May 2016
  • AlabasterVerveAlabasterVerve Posts: 2,980Member Member Posts: 2,980Member Member
    Insulin decreases atherosclerosis by inducing endothelin receptor B expression

    Mice study: Improved insulin signaling reduces atherosclerosis in mouse models

    Source
  • AlabasterVerveAlabasterVerve Posts: 2,980Member Member Posts: 2,980Member Member
    Effect of three levels of dietary protein on metabolic phenotype of healthy individuals with 8 weeks of overfeeding

    Conclusion:

    Eight weeks of overfeeding which increased fat mass including expansion of visceral and deep subcutaneous tissues and intrahepatic lipid, increased fasting insulin and glucose, impaired the suppression of FFA, but did not produce whole body insulin resistance.


    Source
  • AlabasterVerveAlabasterVerve Posts: 2,980Member Member Posts: 2,980Member Member
    Can dietary saturated fat be beneficial in prevention of stroke risk? A meta-analysis.

    This meta-analysis reveals that higher SFA intake is inversely associated with risk of stroke morbidity and mortality with race, sex, and BMI as key factors influencing this risk. There seems to be a threshold of SFA intake for inverse relation of SFA intake with stroke. However, the stroke-reducing or -increasing effects for specific subtypes and specific food sources of SFA can be concealed. Functions of specific subtypes of SFA (e.g. lignoceric acid) and specific food sources of SFA (i.e. plant vs. animal) in relation to stroke need to be clarified in further studies.

    Source
  • AlabasterVerveAlabasterVerve Posts: 2,980Member Member Posts: 2,980Member Member
    Ken Ford talks with Peter Attia on a STEM-Talk podcast
    Episode 1: Peter Attia on how to live longer and better

    Two small snippets from the podcast about ketogenic diets:

    22:18: The ideal diet minimizes glucose and has moderate but sufficient protein; the majority of the diet becomes fat.

    The ideal diet should be one that minimizes glucose, to minimize insulin, but also minimizes protein which of course a well formulated ketogenic diet has relatively small amounts of protein in it because it spares so many amino acids and the majority of the diet becomes fat. And it's really funny every time I talk to, you know sort of one of the godfathers in this space and I walk them through this, they completely agree with you until you get to the "so then the rest is fat". Wait that can't be right.

    So it's like, totally agree there's no reason to have 500g of carbohydrate a day and you don't need 200g of protein a day but you got to eat something. So I think for individuals who a ketogenic diet works - and I was certainly one of them - you are one of them, we have lots of friends who are in that camp who just have remarkable responses to ketogenic diets. You know I think it's a remarkable tool, that said, I've had the privilege of taking care of a lot of people for whom ketogenic diets don't work very well. And I haven't figured out why.


    23:30: Ketogenic diets do not work for everyone. The efficacy of the ketogenic diets may have a genetic basis and it does not seem appropriate for everyone.

    It's frustrating to a lot of patients because they just want this so badly to work and it doesn't. And there's no denying that. When you see their LDL-P skyrocket to 3500nmol/L, when you see their CRP skyrocket, when you see all of these changes that go in the wrong direction from a lipoprotein standpoint, inflammatory standpoint, from a hormonal standpoint. You can tweak it all you want you can say maybe there's too much omega 6 or maybe you gotta go more monounsaturated versus saturated fat but, you know, you've only got a handful of levers to pull there and in the end you sometimes just acknowledge that this diet is not optimal for this person. And yet, interestingly, I'll take that patient and I'll put them on a relatively carbohydrate restricted non-ketogenic diet and can have amazing results.
  • AlabasterVerveAlabasterVerve Posts: 2,980Member Member Posts: 2,980Member Member
    The impact of a low glycaemic index (GI) diet on simultaneous measurements of blood glucose and fat oxidation: A whole body calorimetric study

    Consumption of LGI meals was capable of attenuating 24-hour blood glucose profiles and decreasing postprandial glucose excursions in healthy Asian males. Additionally, LGI mixed meals were able to promote fat oxidation over carbohydrate oxidation when compared to HGI mixed meals. The consumption of low GI meals may be a strategic approach in improving overall glycaemia and increasing fat oxidation in Asians consuming a high carbohydrate diet.

    Source
  • AlabasterVerveAlabasterVerve Posts: 2,980Member Member Posts: 2,980Member Member
    Lack of an association or an inverse association between low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and mortality in the elderly: a systematic review

    Conclusions High LDL-C is inversely associated with mortality in most people over 60 years. This finding is inconsistent with the cholesterol hypothesis (ie, that cholesterol, particularly LDL-C, is inherently atherogenic). Since elderly people with high LDL-C live as long or longer than those with low LDL-C, our analysis provides reason to question the validity of the cholesterol hypothesis. Moreover, our study provides the rationale for a re-evaluation of guidelines recommending pharmacological reduction of LDL-C in the elderly as a component of cardiovascular disease prevention strategies.


    Source
    Media
    edited June 2016
  • AlabasterVerveAlabasterVerve Posts: 2,980Member Member Posts: 2,980Member Member
    Sugar-sweetened carbonated beverage consumption and coronary artery calcification in asymptomatic men and women

    ...only the highest category of sugar-sweetened carbonated beverage consumption was associated with an increased CAC score compared with the lowest consumption category. The multivariable-adjusted CAC ratio comparing participants who consumed ≥5 sugar-sweetened carbonated beverages per week with nondrinkers was 1.70 (95% CI, 1.03-2.81).

    Conclusion

    Our findings suggest that high levels of sugar-sweetened carbonated beverage consumption are associated with a higher prevalence and degree of CAC in asymptomatic adults without a history of cardiovascular disease, cancer, or diabetes.


    Source
  • AlabasterVerveAlabasterVerve Posts: 2,980Member Member Posts: 2,980Member Member
    ‘Moderation’ Is a Useless Concept

    it’s an instruction so vague as to be fundamentally unhelpful. And in the absence of any standard measure, we’re each left to our own devices to figure out what moderation actually means. Which isn’t really a great strategy, as far as health strategies go: According to a new study in the journal Appetite, we tend to define moderation as whatever we’re already doing — or, in some cases, we push the threshold to just above our normal habits, so that moderation comes to mean eating a bit more than we have been.

    Media
    Science
  • AlabasterVerveAlabasterVerve Posts: 2,980Member Member Posts: 2,980Member Member
    Age, obesity, dopamine appear to influence preference for sweet foods

    As young people reach adulthood, their preferences for sweet foods typically decline. But for people with obesity, new research suggests that the drop-off may not be as steep and that the brain's reward system operates differently in obese people than in thinner people, which may play a role in this phenomenon.

    Media

    Science
  • AlabasterVerveAlabasterVerve Posts: 2,980Member Member Posts: 2,980Member Member
    Effect of a high-fat Mediterranean diet on bodyweight and waist circumference: a prespecified secondary outcomes analysis of the PREDIMED randomised controlled trial

    ...three interventions: Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil (n=2543); Mediterranean diet supplemented with nuts (n=2454); or a control diet (advice to reduce dietary fat; n=2450). Energy restriction was not advised, nor was physical activity promoted.

    Interpretation
    A long-term intervention with an unrestricted-calorie, high-vegetable-fat Mediterranean diet was associated with decreases in bodyweight and less gain in central adiposity compared with a control diet. These results lend support to advice not restricting intake of healthy fats for bodyweight maintenance.


    Funding
    Spanish Government, CIBERobn, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Hojiblanca, Patrimonio Comunal Olivarero, California Walnut Commission, Borges SA, and Morella Nuts.

    Source
  • AlabasterVerveAlabasterVerve Posts: 2,980Member Member Posts: 2,980Member Member
    Ketogenic diet's effect being tested on ovarian cancer patients after animal models proved successful.

    "During the 12-week trial, 66 participants will be randomized into one of two diets—the ketogenic diet and a diet recommended by the American Cancer Society that emphasizes a need for whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and meats and oils low in saturated fat."

    Source
  • AlabasterVerveAlabasterVerve Posts: 2,980Member Member Posts: 2,980Member Member
    Mice study.

    Insulin-sensitive fat leads to obesity

    The study showed that when mice ate normal food, their weight didn't change much whether they had normal, excessive, or low levels of SORLA. Mice with too much SORLA only gained extreme amounts of weight when they ate "fast food" - a diet high in fat and carbohydrates. "This suggests that adipose tissue that is overly sensitive to insulin only becomes a problem if you have an unhealthy diet," says Willnow.

    Media
Sign In or Register to comment.