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Best macro ratio

nesk2425nesk2425 Posts: 1Member, Premium Member Posts: 1Member, Premium Member
I'm trying to figure out the best way to lose weight. So far I have been trying to get my macros 35% protein 35% carbs and 30% fat. But I'm beginning to see that I need to learn how to figure it all out but everyone seems to have different opinions. Can anyone help?
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Replies

  • seska422seska422 Posts: 3,185Member, Premium Member Posts: 3,185Member, Premium Member
    For weight loss, the most important part is that the macro balance works for you. You need to get at least enough protein and fat. Beyond that, I'd recommend that you keep the macros close to the balance that you normally eat.

    The fewer changes you make, the easier it is to stick with a weight loss program.

    The MFP default of 50%C-20%P-30%F has worked just fine for me.
    edited February 2016
  • livingleanlivingcleanlivingleanlivingclean Posts: 11,767Member Member Posts: 11,767Member Member
    percentages are not macros, and there is no best. You need sufficient protein and fat grams, then the rest can be carbs, or a combination of carbs, more protein and fat.

    Losing weight ultimately comes down to calories. body composition, satiety/satisfaction and health will be more determined by macros within the calorie allowance. This is personal and depends upon the individual...
    edited February 2016
  • rebekahstrachan3rebekahstrachan3 Posts: 26Member Member Posts: 26Member Member
    make your calories count by macro counting. set your calories to 1500 with 50% protein, 25% carbs and 25% fats, this really helped me out when I first started off and I lost 12lbs in 25 days. Remember carbohydrates turn to glycogen which is stored in the muscle and when the glycogen stores over flow it is converted into fat so you need to keep carbohydrates at a moderate level to ensure fat loss. The body uses fat and carbohydrates as energy sources and proteins for building blocks and cell regeneration. Hope this helps.
  • jackliftsjacklifts Posts: 396Member, Premium Member Posts: 396Member, Premium Member
    Your macro breakdown looks good.
    If you want, you can use these ranges

    159gs7kabhfv.png



  • AnvilHeadAnvilHead Posts: 18,543Member Member Posts: 18,543Member Member
    There's a pretty good guide to setting up your macros here, along with how to do the calculations: http://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/819055/setting-your-calorie-and-macro-targets/p1
  • Erfw7471Erfw7471 Posts: 242Member Member Posts: 242Member Member
    jacklifts wrote: »
    Your macro breakdown looks good.
    If you want, you can use these ranges

    159gs7kabhfv.png



    Unless the OP is prepping for a bodybuilding contest, I'm not sure this is optimum for him/her - personal preferences & abilities need to be taken into account as well.

    OP, what are your goals? Are you currently exercising (how much and what type)? What type of foods do you like to eat and what does your current diet consist of? How much weight are you wanting to lose? What are your stats?

    The setting targets link above is a good one.
  • Vortex88Vortex88 Posts: 60Member Member Posts: 60Member Member
    33%/33%/33% CALS (bearing in mind fat has more than twice the calories per gram than protein and carbs) from each is a good place to start for most people e.g. 2000 cals would be 166g protein / 166g carbs / 74g fat. Great place to start and adjust from there.
  • lemurcat12lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886Member Member Posts: 30,886Member Member
    It's unlikely to matter that much, but picking one and sticking with it for a while and seeing how you feel is a good way to start and those are fine macro percentages to start with.
  • Yi5hedr3Yi5hedr3 Posts: 2,704Member, Premium Member Posts: 2,704Member, Premium Member
  • hazleyes81hazleyes81 Posts: 296Member Member Posts: 296Member Member
    ^ This. Pick something. Stick with it for at least a couple of weeks. Measure your food and activity accurately. Gauge your energy levels, cravings, etc accurately.

    Don't put anything off limits, unless it is a trigger food. For instance, I eat low carb, but this is not to restrict me but because I know that (for me) many carbs trigger cravings and binges, stomach upset, and lethargy. Luckily this means I eat a LOT of vegetables and high fiber/healthy fat carbs. Secondly, I LOVE chinese food, and making it off limits makes for an unsatisfying and unsustainable way of eating. So I have chinese food about once a week, sans rice.

    It's all about finding what works for you, physically AND mentally. It takes time, being realistic and honest, and dedication.
  • LHWhite903LHWhite903 Posts: 208Member Member Posts: 208Member Member
    @nesk2425 , @hazleyes81 is correct. We have to work out what's best for us.

    Mine are 45% carbs, 35% fat and 20% protein. On carbs, for me, this is neither high enough to hurt my head nor low enough to weaken my energy. On this, I can do well whether I rest all day or do a bit of exercise.
  • BeinLovedBeinLoved Posts: 33Member, Premium Member Posts: 33Member, Premium Member
    I'm currently set at 39%P, 33%C, 28%F and am having awesome success with these ratios. I'm focusing on muscle gains and fat loss through weight training followed by low intensity cardio (HR in the 140s) 5 days a week. I agree with the above statements of setting your macros and sticking with it for a few weeks to determine what needs to be adjusted.
  • lemurcat12lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886Member Member Posts: 30,886Member Member
    80% to 90% carbs, 5% to 12% protein, 5% to 8% fat. I achieve that easily without thinking by eating whole-plants food and avoiding animal products altogether. weight loss comes automatically on the long term and it is maintainable and sustainable long term as well.

    This actually would be a point to debate -- if you want to debate it, why not start a thread?
  • StealthHealthStealthHealth Posts: 2,418Member Member Posts: 2,418Member Member
    seska422 wrote: »
    For weight loss, the most important part is that the macro balance works for you. You need to get at least enough protein and fat. Beyond that, I'd recommend that you keep the macros close to the balance that you normally eat.

    ^^agree

  • J72FITJ72FIT Posts: 5,243Member Member Posts: 5,243Member Member
    mtxygba09lu8.png

    Don't get too caught up in the numbers out of the gate. First get your calorie needs in order then worry about macros and so on and so forth...
  • lemurcat12lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886Member Member Posts: 30,886Member Member
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    This actually would be a point to debate -- if you want to debate it, why not start a thread?

    Dear @lemurcat12 why me? what about other participants who stated their ratios like 45% carbs, 35% fat and 20% protein, or 33%/33%/33% CALS or 50% protein, 25% carbs and 25% fats?? Why singling me out?

    Because I don't think the first question was really a debate question and most people were saying things like "it's individual, whatever works for you, this is what I do." You seemed to be actually asserting that certain macros were best, and I think that is a debate topic likely to be lost in the advice thread.

    For the record, as I said upthread, I don't think specific macros are particularly important beyond certain minimums, as traditional human diets with positive health outcomes are all over the place. For specific goals or health issues they may matter more, but one can have a horrible diet with 70% carbs and a great diet with 70% carbs and same with lower carb diets, higher fat diets, etc.
    edited March 2016
  • StealthHealthStealthHealth Posts: 2,418Member Member Posts: 2,418Member Member
    80% to 90% carbs, 5% to 12% protein, 5% to 8% fat. I achieve that easily without thinking by eating whole-plants food and avoiding animal products altogether. weight loss comes automatically on the long term and it is maintainable and sustainable long term as well.

    I don't understand how it could be both (automatic loss and sustainable long term). If the weight loss is automatic then you are in calorific deficit. To continue on that long term would mean you would eventually become unhealthily underweight and eventually die. So, I assume you are, at some point, intending to consciously up your calories to stay within a healthy/desired weight range - or do you anticipate that, that will happen automatically (hunger signals?) too?

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