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Artificial sweeteners

LKArghLKArgh Posts: 5,085Member Member Posts: 5,085Member Member
Just read this today, and thought of the debate board
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/860431?nlid=102903_3561
The basic idea is that some of the zero-calorie sweeteners appear to be causing more damage than real sugar, especially on glycemic control.

Replies

  • stevencloserstevencloser Posts: 8,917Member Member Posts: 8,917Member Member
    Can't access without an account.
  • ReaderGirl3ReaderGirl3 Posts: 868Member Member Posts: 868Member Member
    Can't access without an account.

    Me either, OP is it posted somewhere else that's accessible?
  • LKArghLKArgh Posts: 5,085Member Member Posts: 5,085Member Member
    Ugh, sorry, I forgot I have an account, I have my browser to automatically log in.
  • LKArghLKArgh Posts: 5,085Member Member Posts: 5,085Member Member
  • senecarrsenecarr Posts: 5,377Member Member Posts: 5,377Member Member
    Next, they tested these findings in humans, using a database with nutritional profiling in a large number of patients, with ongoing data collection.[1] They identified 381 nondiabetics in their database, with about 44% males. They looked at associations with glycemic control and ingestion of noncaloric artificial sweeteners. They had a very dynamic way to look at dietary recall with a validated dietary history questionnaire.
    So they discovered people that are diabetic or near diabetic start drinking more diet pop and using more artificial sweeteners? Or more accurately, more of these people recall (dietary recall database) using products with artificial sweeteners? I am shocked!
  • stevencloserstevencloser Posts: 8,917Member Member Posts: 8,917Member Member
    aggelikik wrote: »

    Thanks, can you also link to the reference? The link doesn't work in the repost.
  • lithezebralithezebra Posts: 3,684Member Member Posts: 3,684Member Member
    I'm fascinated by the part about artificial sweeteners causing detrimental changes in gut flora.

  • RuatineRuatine Posts: 3,407Member Member Posts: 3,407Member Member
    Here's the same article on Medscape, which has a ~10 minute video from the writer: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/860431#vp_2

    Here's the link to the study as published in Nature: http://weizmann-usa.org/docs/default-source/pdfs/artificial-sweeteners.pdf?sfvrsn=2
  • lithezebralithezebra Posts: 3,684Member Member Posts: 3,684Member Member
    Thanks, @Ruatine . I wonder if use of sugar alcohols, monk fruit, and stevia have an effect on gut microbiota.

    Here's an abstract on maltitol, which increased Bifidobacteria and the production of short chain fatty acids: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=7879346&fileId=S0007114510001078

    And one on erythritol, likely not fermented by gut microbiota: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=924264&fileId=S0007114505002291

    And one on xylitol and polydextrose: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1750-3841.2007.00350.x/abstract?userIsAuthenticated=false&deniedAccessCustomisedMessage=
    edited March 2016
  • stevencloserstevencloser Posts: 8,917Member Member Posts: 8,917Member Member
    senecarr wrote: »
    Next, they tested these findings in humans, using a database with nutritional profiling in a large number of patients, with ongoing data collection.[1] They identified 381 nondiabetics in their database, with about 44% males. They looked at associations with glycemic control and ingestion of noncaloric artificial sweeteners. They had a very dynamic way to look at dietary recall with a validated dietary history questionnaire.
    So they discovered people that are diabetic or near diabetic start drinking more diet pop and using more artificial sweeteners? Or more accurately, more of these people recall (dietary recall database) using products with artificial sweeteners? I am shocked!

    I find the part where they were actually looking if it was causal better. Not only did they feed them the ADI which is likely many times higher than what normal people would eat, they had a whole 7 participants out of which 3 had no effect whatsoever but the article makes it out like that's a huge important finding.
  • lithezebralithezebra Posts: 3,684Member Member Posts: 3,684Member Member
    senecarr wrote: »
    Next, they tested these findings in humans, using a database with nutritional profiling in a large number of patients, with ongoing data collection.[1] They identified 381 nondiabetics in their database, with about 44% males. They looked at associations with glycemic control and ingestion of noncaloric artificial sweeteners. They had a very dynamic way to look at dietary recall with a validated dietary history questionnaire.
    So they discovered people that are diabetic or near diabetic start drinking more diet pop and using more artificial sweeteners? Or more accurately, more of these people recall (dietary recall database) using products with artificial sweeteners? I am shocked!

    I find the part where they were actually looking if it was causal better. Not only did they feed them the ADI which is likely many times higher than what normal people would eat, they had a whole 7 participants out of which 3 had no effect whatsoever but the article makes it out like that's a huge important finding.

    Maybe there were differences in the gut microbiomes of the participants who showed no effect, that were protective. One thing about humans, rather than germ free mice who've had a standardized gut microbiome transplanted into them, is that our microbiota vary.

    edited March 2016
  • singingfluteladysingingflutelady Posts: 8,629Member Member Posts: 8,629Member Member
    @lithezebra I don't know if sugar alcohols effect the gut microbe but they sure do effect my gut and have a major laxative effect for me (especially sorbitol) even in tiny amounts. I have Crohn's so my gut is very sensitive though.
  • lithezebralithezebra Posts: 3,684Member Member Posts: 3,684Member Member
    @lithezebra I don't know if sugar alcohols effect the gut microbe but they sure do effect my gut and have a major laxative effect for me (especially sorbitol) even in tiny amounts. I have Crohn's so my gut is very sensitive though.

    Some of them do that to me too. It's likely that the different responses different people have to sugar alcohols is reflective of different microbial communities. I haven't found an article yet that discusses whether sugar alcohols change the makeup of the human gut microbiota. But it seems like a sweetener that some, but not all, microbes can eat would have to favor the species that can use it for energy, and any species that can use the metabolites from the initial breakdown of the sweetener, and any metabolites further down the chain.
    edited March 2016
  • lithezebralithezebra Posts: 3,684Member Member Posts: 3,684Member Member
  • GaleHawkinsGaleHawkins Posts: 7,623Member Member Posts: 7,623Member Member
    Can't access without an account.

    Steven just do it the same way you do to get on MFP.

  • GaleHawkinsGaleHawkins Posts: 7,623Member Member Posts: 7,623Member Member
    Thanks @Ruatine and @aggelikik for the different sources for the great info. The chemical cocktails are getting harder and harder on my body it seems.
  • TheNightWalkerTheNightWalker Posts: 59Member, Premium Member Posts: 59Member, Premium Member
    I haven't read all the links here, but I did read the medscape article and even though they write that they fed mice with saccharin, sucralose and aspartame they didn't really write about the effects of sucralose and aspartame, only saccharine.
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