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World’s obese population hits 641 million, global study finds

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  • GaleHawkinsGaleHawkins Posts: 7,623Member Member Posts: 7,623Member Member
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Recently found this article saying that now, over half of calories consumed in the US are from ultra processed foods, according to self reports. :/

    http://www.techtimes.com/articles/139909/20160310/more-than-half-of-american-calories-come-from-processed-food.htm

    Ultra processed foods don't make people fat. Eating too much food and not moving enough makes people fat.

    @Packerjohn it would be great if that was factual medically speaking.
  • GaleHawkinsGaleHawkins Posts: 7,623Member Member Posts: 7,623Member Member
    tomteboda wrote: »
    senecarr wrote: »
    Interesting that they describe morbid obesity as impacting breathing or walking, but that's only one of the definitions of morbid obesity.

    I think a functional definition of obesity and morbid obesity would be great more helpful than the bmi definition.

    That is a good point. Two years ago when was obese with a 35 BMI it did not have a clue my BMI #.
  • senecarrsenecarr Posts: 5,377Member Member Posts: 5,377Member Member
    tomteboda wrote: »
    senecarr wrote: »
    Interesting that they describe morbid obesity as impacting breathing or walking, but that's only one of the definitions of morbid obesity.

    I think a functional definition of obesity and morbid obesity would be great more helpful than the bmi definition.

    I don't have a particular stance on it. I was morbidly obese by 2 different weight based definitions but never had comorbidities. I account myself lucky in that regard, though I always thought if I started down prediabetes, fear of having to inject myself would get me changing things. I guess I found different motivation.
  • stevencloserstevencloser Posts: 8,917Member Member Posts: 8,917Member Member
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Recently found this article saying that now, over half of calories consumed in the US are from ultra processed foods, according to self reports. :/

    http://www.techtimes.com/articles/139909/20160310/more-than-half-of-american-calories-come-from-processed-food.htm

    Ultra processed foods don't make people fat. Eating too much food and not moving enough makes people fat.

    @Packerjohn it would be great if that was factual medically speaking.

    Please share your medical facts about how surplus calories vanish into thin air if they're not from processed foods.
  • PackerjohnPackerjohn Posts: 4,859Member Member Posts: 4,859Member Member
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Recently found this article saying that now, over half of calories consumed in the US are from ultra processed foods, according to self reports. :/

    http://www.techtimes.com/articles/139909/20160310/more-than-half-of-american-calories-come-from-processed-food.htm

    Ultra processed foods don't make people fat. Eating too much food and not moving enough makes people fat.

    @Packerjohn it would be great if that was factual medically speaking.

    Please share your medical facts about how surplus calories vanish into thin air if they're not from processed foods.

    Thanks was just going to follow up on @GaleHawkins comment.
  • PackerjohnPackerjohn Posts: 4,859Member Member Posts: 4,859Member Member
    tomteboda wrote: »
    senecarr wrote: »
    Interesting that they describe morbid obesity as impacting breathing or walking, but that's only one of the definitions of morbid obesity.

    I think a functional definition of obesity and morbid obesity would be great more helpful than the bmi definition.

    For 90%+ of.the population the results of a simple BMI measurement would match the classification of any functional definition someone would develop
  • kbmnursekbmnurse Posts: 2,487Member Member Posts: 2,487Member Member
    Disgusting.
  • FunkyTobiasFunkyTobias Posts: 1,776Member Member Posts: 1,776Member Member
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Recently found this article saying that now, over half of calories consumed in the US are from ultra processed foods, according to self reports. :/

    http://www.techtimes.com/articles/139909/20160310/more-than-half-of-american-calories-come-from-processed-food.htm

    Ultra processed foods don't make people fat. Eating too much food and not moving enough makes people fat.

    @Packerjohn it would be great if that was factual medically speaking.

    Please share your medical facts about how surplus calories vanish into thin air if they're not from processed foods.



    Aslin P. Unveiling the unicorn: a leader's guide to ACO preparation. J Healthc Manag. 2011 Jul-Aug;56(4):245-53.

    Bailey T. The dummies guide to promoting wildlife conservation in the Middle East: telling tales of unicorns and ossifrages to save the hawk and leopard. J Avian Med Surg. 2011 Jun;25(2):136-43.

    Pentecost MJ. Unicorn ahead. J Am Coll Radiol. 2011 Feb;8(2):86.

    Isaacs D. The unicorn. J Paediatr Child Health. 2009 Oct;45(10):618, 623

    Hortin GL. Of immunounreactive urinary albumin and unicorns. Am J Clin Pathol. 2008 Aug;130(2):314-5.

    Graf J. Never play Leapfrog with a unicorn. Crit Care Med. 2007 Oct;35(10):2434-5.

    O'Sullivan M. Unicorns or Tiger Woods: are lie detection experts myths or rarities? A response to on lie detection "wizards" by Bond and Uysal. Law Hum Behav. 2007 Feb;31(1):117-23.

    Frenking G, Krapp A. Unicorns in the world of chemical bonding models. J Comput Chem. 2007 Jan 15;28(1):15-24. Review.

    Sage WM, Kalyan DN. Horses or unicorns: can paying for performance make quality competition routine? J Health Polit Policy Law. 2006 Jun;31(3):531-56.

    Potter P. Unicorn tapestries, horned animals, and Prion disease. Emerg Infect Dis. 2004 Jun;10(6):1181-2

    Askanas V, Engel WK. Unicorns, dragons, polymyositis, and other mythical beasts. Neurology. 2004 Jul 27;63(2):403-4; author reply 404.

    Hagan JC 3rd. Unicorns, obstetricians, neurosurgeons--three things hard to find in Missouri. Mo Med. 2004 Jan-Feb;101(1):4-5.

    Streiner DL. Unicorns do exist: a tutorial on "proving" the null hypothesis. Can J Psychiatry. 2003 Dec;48(11):756-61.

    Amato AA, Griggs RC. Unicorns, dragons, polymyositis, and other mythological beasts. Neurology. 2003 Aug 12;61(3):288-9.

    LeBoit PE. Pictures of a unicorn? Am J Dermatopathol. 2003 Feb;25(1):88-91

    Simon L. Research into the origins and characteristics of unicorns: mental illness as the unicorn. Ethical Hum Sci Serv. 2000 Fall-Winter;2(3):181-92.

    Howe EG. Unicorns, Carravaggio, and fetal surgery. J Clin Ethics. 2001 Winter;12(4):333-45.

    Ariew R. Leibniz on the unicorn and various other curiosities. Early Sci Med. 1998 Nov;3(4):267-88.

    Stahl FW. Unicorns revisited. Genetics. 1992 Dec;132(4):865-7.

    Foster PL. Directed mutation: between unicorns and goats. J Bacteriol. 1992 Mar;174(6):1711-6.

    Morreim EH. The law of nature and the law of the land: of horses, zebras, and unicorns. Pharos Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Med Soc. 1990 Spring;53(2):2-6.

    [No authors listed] Editorial: Why unicorns? Med J Aust. 1976 May 15;1(20):728-9.
    http://alanaragon.com/unicorns
  • senecarrsenecarr Posts: 5,377Member Member Posts: 5,377Member Member
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    tomteboda wrote: »
    senecarr wrote: »
    Interesting that they describe morbid obesity as impacting breathing or walking, but that's only one of the definitions of morbid obesity.

    I think a functional definition of obesity and morbid obesity would be great more helpful than the bmi definition.

    For 90%+ of.the population the results of a simple BMI measurement would match the classification of any functional definition someone would develop

    Not really, I imagine the functional definition.captures more people. Functional means they have a BMI of 30+ and at least one obesity related issue. The non functional definitions are BMI of 40+ (I'd have to double check to be sure) or 100 lb past overweight (overweight being BMI 25+).
  • Serah87Serah87 Posts: 5,498Member Member Posts: 5,498Member Member
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Recently found this article saying that now, over half of calories consumed in the US are from ultra processed foods, according to self reports. :/

    http://www.techtimes.com/articles/139909/20160310/more-than-half-of-american-calories-come-from-processed-food.htm

    Ultra processed foods don't make people fat. Eating too much food and not moving enough makes people fat.

    @Packerjohn it would be great if that was factual medically speaking.

    LOL, I wish I could say more, but I won't.
  • PackerjohnPackerjohn Posts: 4,859Member Member Posts: 4,859Member Member
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Recently found this article saying that now, over half of calories consumed in the US are from ultra processed foods, according to self reports. :/

    http://www.techtimes.com/articles/139909/20160310/more-than-half-of-american-calories-come-from-processed-food.htm

    Ultra processed foods don't make people fat. Eating too much food and not moving enough makes people fat.

    @Packerjohn it would be great if that was factual medically speaking.

    I'm a 205 pound male. If I ate 1500 calories of nothing but processed food what do you think would happen to my weight?
  • sunnybeaches105sunnybeaches105 Posts: 2,846Member Member Posts: 2,846Member Member
    There was a report on the news last night saying Obesity is now more of a problem than starvation/malnutrition!

    I'm going to guess (1) that the report is typical popular press inflation of facts (I would honestly be interested in seeing the report if you have access to it) and (2) that to the people starving it's not. The obese can lose weight. They make a choice not to. The starving aren't making a conscious choice to not eat. We have food insecurity even in rich countries and famines still hit developing countries with some regularity. I'm far more concerned about that than I am with the obesity "epidemic." This is also why I am very pro-GMO foods.

    Edit: I found a typo, as usual. :-)

    ETA: The second article above made the following statement:

    "The main takeaway? Excess weight has become a far bigger global health problem than weighing too little. While low body weight is still a substantial health risk for parts of Africa and South Asia, being too heavy is a much more common hazard around the globe."

    Okay, I get it. They're assuming that "more common" equals a bigger global health problem. I don't buy that assumption. For the assumption to work the risks and costs need to be equivalent. I suppose one could argue that health costs will be more with the obese (because they can afford to pay for doctors) but that's a pretty **** argument to make.
    edited April 2016
  • queenliz99queenliz99 Posts: 15,358Member Member Posts: 15,358Member Member
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Recently found this article saying that now, over half of calories consumed in the US are from ultra processed foods, according to self reports. :/

    http://www.techtimes.com/articles/139909/20160310/more-than-half-of-american-calories-come-from-processed-food.htm

    Ultra processed foods don't make people fat. Eating too much food and not moving enough makes people fat.

    @Packerjohn it would be great if that was factual medically speaking.

    Please share your medical facts about how surplus calories vanish into thin air if they're not from processed foods.



    Aslin P. Unveiling the unicorn: a leader's guide to ACO preparation. J Healthc Manag. 2011 Jul-Aug;56(4):245-53.

    Bailey T. The dummies guide to promoting wildlife conservation in the Middle East: telling tales of unicorns and ossifrages to save the hawk and leopard. J Avian Med Surg. 2011 Jun;25(2):136-43.

    Pentecost MJ. Unicorn ahead. J Am Coll Radiol. 2011 Feb;8(2):86.

    Isaacs D. The unicorn. J Paediatr Child Health. 2009 Oct;45(10):618, 623

    Hortin GL. Of immunounreactive urinary albumin and unicorns. Am J Clin Pathol. 2008 Aug;130(2):314-5.

    Graf J. Never play Leapfrog with a unicorn. Crit Care Med. 2007 Oct;35(10):2434-5.

    O'Sullivan M. Unicorns or Tiger Woods: are lie detection experts myths or rarities? A response to on lie detection "wizards" by Bond and Uysal. Law Hum Behav. 2007 Feb;31(1):117-23.

    Frenking G, Krapp A. Unicorns in the world of chemical bonding models. J Comput Chem. 2007 Jan 15;28(1):15-24. Review.

    Sage WM, Kalyan DN. Horses or unicorns: can paying for performance make quality competition routine? J Health Polit Policy Law. 2006 Jun;31(3):531-56.

    Potter P. Unicorn tapestries, horned animals, and Prion disease. Emerg Infect Dis. 2004 Jun;10(6):1181-2

    Askanas V, Engel WK. Unicorns, dragons, polymyositis, and other mythical beasts. Neurology. 2004 Jul 27;63(2):403-4; author reply 404.

    Hagan JC 3rd. Unicorns, obstetricians, neurosurgeons--three things hard to find in Missouri. Mo Med. 2004 Jan-Feb;101(1):4-5.

    Streiner DL. Unicorns do exist: a tutorial on "proving" the null hypothesis. Can J Psychiatry. 2003 Dec;48(11):756-61.

    Amato AA, Griggs RC. Unicorns, dragons, polymyositis, and other mythological beasts. Neurology. 2003 Aug 12;61(3):288-9.

    LeBoit PE. Pictures of a unicorn? Am J Dermatopathol. 2003 Feb;25(1):88-91

    Simon L. Research into the origins and characteristics of unicorns: mental illness as the unicorn. Ethical Hum Sci Serv. 2000 Fall-Winter;2(3):181-92.

    Howe EG. Unicorns, Carravaggio, and fetal surgery. J Clin Ethics. 2001 Winter;12(4):333-45.

    Ariew R. Leibniz on the unicorn and various other curiosities. Early Sci Med. 1998 Nov;3(4):267-88.

    Stahl FW. Unicorns revisited. Genetics. 1992 Dec;132(4):865-7.

    Foster PL. Directed mutation: between unicorns and goats. J Bacteriol. 1992 Mar;174(6):1711-6.

    Morreim EH. The law of nature and the law of the land: of horses, zebras, and unicorns. Pharos Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Med Soc. 1990 Spring;53(2):2-6.

    [No authors listed] Editorial: Why unicorns? Med J Aust. 1976 May 15;1(20):728-9.
    http://alanaragon.com/unicorns

    I hope you saved this! I see these sources as evidence of unicorns are really among us. Nice work
  • GaleHawkinsGaleHawkins Posts: 7,623Member Member Posts: 7,623Member Member
    queenliz99 wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Recently found this article saying that now, over half of calories consumed in the US are from ultra processed foods, according to self reports. :/

    http://www.techtimes.com/articles/139909/20160310/more-than-half-of-american-calories-come-from-processed-food.htm

    Ultra processed foods don't make people fat. Eating too much food and not moving enough makes people fat.

    @Packerjohn it would be great if that was factual medically speaking.

    Please share your medical facts about how surplus calories vanish into thin air if they're not from processed foods.



    Aslin P. Unveiling the unicorn: a leader's guide to ACO preparation. J Healthc Manag. 2011 Jul-Aug;56(4):245-53.

    Bailey T. The dummies guide to promoting wildlife conservation in the Middle East: telling tales of unicorns and ossifrages to save the hawk and leopard. J Avian Med Surg. 2011 Jun;25(2):136-43.

    Pentecost MJ. Unicorn ahead. J Am Coll Radiol. 2011 Feb;8(2):86.

    Isaacs D. The unicorn. J Paediatr Child Health. 2009 Oct;45(10):618, 623

    Hortin GL. Of immunounreactive urinary albumin and unicorns. Am J Clin Pathol. 2008 Aug;130(2):314-5.

    Graf J. Never play Leapfrog with a unicorn. Crit Care Med. 2007 Oct;35(10):2434-5.

    O'Sullivan M. Unicorns or Tiger Woods: are lie detection experts myths or rarities? A response to on lie detection "wizards" by Bond and Uysal. Law Hum Behav. 2007 Feb;31(1):117-23.

    Frenking G, Krapp A. Unicorns in the world of chemical bonding models. J Comput Chem. 2007 Jan 15;28(1):15-24. Review.

    Sage WM, Kalyan DN. Horses or unicorns: can paying for performance make quality competition routine? J Health Polit Policy Law. 2006 Jun;31(3):531-56.

    Potter P. Unicorn tapestries, horned animals, and Prion disease. Emerg Infect Dis. 2004 Jun;10(6):1181-2

    Askanas V, Engel WK. Unicorns, dragons, polymyositis, and other mythical beasts. Neurology. 2004 Jul 27;63(2):403-4; author reply 404.

    Hagan JC 3rd. Unicorns, obstetricians, neurosurgeons--three things hard to find in Missouri. Mo Med. 2004 Jan-Feb;101(1):4-5.

    Streiner DL. Unicorns do exist: a tutorial on "proving" the null hypothesis. Can J Psychiatry. 2003 Dec;48(11):756-61.

    Amato AA, Griggs RC. Unicorns, dragons, polymyositis, and other mythological beasts. Neurology. 2003 Aug 12;61(3):288-9.

    LeBoit PE. Pictures of a unicorn? Am J Dermatopathol. 2003 Feb;25(1):88-91

    Simon L. Research into the origins and characteristics of unicorns: mental illness as the unicorn. Ethical Hum Sci Serv. 2000 Fall-Winter;2(3):181-92.

    Howe EG. Unicorns, Carravaggio, and fetal surgery. J Clin Ethics. 2001 Winter;12(4):333-45.

    Ariew R. Leibniz on the unicorn and various other curiosities. Early Sci Med. 1998 Nov;3(4):267-88.

    Stahl FW. Unicorns revisited. Genetics. 1992 Dec;132(4):865-7.

    Foster PL. Directed mutation: between unicorns and goats. J Bacteriol. 1992 Mar;174(6):1711-6.

    Morreim EH. The law of nature and the law of the land: of horses, zebras, and unicorns. Pharos Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Med Soc. 1990 Spring;53(2):2-6.

    [No authors listed] Editorial: Why unicorns? Med J Aust. 1976 May 15;1(20):728-9.
    http://alanaragon.com/unicorns

    I hope you saved this! I see these sources as evidence of unicorns are really among us. Nice work

    cnn.com/2016/03/29/living/real-unicorn-remains/

    @queenliz99 here is a current story on the subject.
  • allaboutthecakeallaboutthecake Posts: 1,431Member Member Posts: 1,431Member Member
    Nice stats. Makes those in my immediate family glad they entered the healthcare business. Business is Booming!

    ka-Ching!
  • Christine_72Christine_72 Posts: 16,074Member Member Posts: 16,074Member Member
    There was a report on the news last night saying Obesity is now more of a problem than starvation/malnutrition!

    I'm going to guess (1) that the report is typical popular press inflation of facts (I would honestly be interested in seeing the report if you have access to it) and (2) that to the people starving it's not. The obese can lose weight. They make a choice not to. The starving aren't making a conscious choice to not eat. We have food insecurity even in rich countries and famines still hit developing countries with some regularity. I'm far more concerned about that than I am with the obesity "epidemic." This is also why I am very pro-GMO foods.

    Edit: I found a typo, as usual. :-)

    ETA: The second article above made the following statement:

    "The main takeaway? Excess weight has become a far bigger global health problem than weighing too little. While low body weight is still a substantial health risk for parts of Africa and South Asia, being too heavy is a much more common hazard around the globe."

    Okay, I get it. They're assuming that "more common" equals a bigger global health problem. I don't buy that assumption. For the assumption to work the risks and costs need to be equivalent. I suppose one could argue that health costs will be more with the obese (because they can afford to pay for doctors) but that's a pretty **** argument to make.

    It was just a snippet on the 6oclock news. The doctor they were interviewing just said "Obesity is now more of a problem in the world than starvation/malnutrition". He could have been exaggerating, and he didn't elaborate further, whether he meant in every single country on the planet, or just the westernised countries??
  • sunnybeaches105sunnybeaches105 Posts: 2,846Member Member Posts: 2,846Member Member
    There was a report on the news last night saying Obesity is now more of a problem than starvation/malnutrition!

    I'm going to guess (1) that the report is typical popular press inflation of facts (I would honestly be interested in seeing the report if you have access to it) and (2) that to the people starving it's not. The obese can lose weight. They make a choice not to. The starving aren't making a conscious choice to not eat. We have food insecurity even in rich countries and famines still hit developing countries with some regularity. I'm far more concerned about that than I am with the obesity "epidemic." This is also why I am very pro-GMO foods.

    Edit: I found a typo, as usual. :-)

    ETA: The second article above made the following statement:

    "The main takeaway? Excess weight has become a far bigger global health problem than weighing too little. While low body weight is still a substantial health risk for parts of Africa and South Asia, being too heavy is a much more common hazard around the globe."

    Okay, I get it. They're assuming that "more common" equals a bigger global health problem. I don't buy that assumption. For the assumption to work the risks and costs need to be equivalent. I suppose one could argue that health costs will be more with the obese (because they can afford to pay for doctors) but that's a pretty **** argument to make.

    It was just a snippet on the 6oclock news. The doctor they were interviewing just said "Obesity is now more of a problem in the world than starvation/malnutrition". He could have been exaggerating, and he didn't elaborate further, whether he meant in every single country on the planet, or just the westernised countries??

    Thank you. The news probably took it from the second article the OP posted (totally guessing here, but makes sense).
  • mangrothianmangrothian Posts: 1,349Member Member Posts: 1,349Member Member
    Maybe I'm blind, but no one has linked the original Lancet article that the OP's news reports are referring to in this thread. It's open access, so you can read the whole thing rather than just the abstract:

    thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(16)30054-X/abstract
  • ClosetBayesianClosetBayesian Posts: 834Member Member Posts: 834Member Member
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Recently found this article saying that now, over half of calories consumed in the US are from ultra processed foods, according to self reports. :/

    http://www.techtimes.com/articles/139909/20160310/more-than-half-of-american-calories-come-from-processed-food.htm

    Ultra processed foods don't make people fat. Eating too much food and not moving enough makes people fat.

    @Packerjohn it would be great if that was factual medically speaking.

    Please share your medical facts about how surplus calories vanish into thin air if they're not from processed foods.



    Aslin P. Unveiling the unicorn: a leader's guide to ACO preparation. J Healthc Manag. 2011 Jul-Aug;56(4):245-53.

    Bailey T. The dummies guide to promoting wildlife conservation in the Middle East: telling tales of unicorns and ossifrages to save the hawk and leopard. J Avian Med Surg. 2011 Jun;25(2):136-43.

    Pentecost MJ. Unicorn ahead. J Am Coll Radiol. 2011 Feb;8(2):86.

    Isaacs D. The unicorn. J Paediatr Child Health. 2009 Oct;45(10):618, 623

    Hortin GL. Of immunounreactive urinary albumin and unicorns. Am J Clin Pathol. 2008 Aug;130(2):314-5.

    Graf J. Never play Leapfrog with a unicorn. Crit Care Med. 2007 Oct;35(10):2434-5.

    O'Sullivan M. Unicorns or Tiger Woods: are lie detection experts myths or rarities? A response to on lie detection "wizards" by Bond and Uysal. Law Hum Behav. 2007 Feb;31(1):117-23.

    Frenking G, Krapp A. Unicorns in the world of chemical bonding models. J Comput Chem. 2007 Jan 15;28(1):15-24. Review.

    Sage WM, Kalyan DN. Horses or unicorns: can paying for performance make quality competition routine? J Health Polit Policy Law. 2006 Jun;31(3):531-56.

    Potter P. Unicorn tapestries, horned animals, and Prion disease. Emerg Infect Dis. 2004 Jun;10(6):1181-2

    Askanas V, Engel WK. Unicorns, dragons, polymyositis, and other mythical beasts. Neurology. 2004 Jul 27;63(2):403-4; author reply 404.

    Hagan JC 3rd. Unicorns, obstetricians, neurosurgeons--three things hard to find in Missouri. Mo Med. 2004 Jan-Feb;101(1):4-5.

    Streiner DL. Unicorns do exist: a tutorial on "proving" the null hypothesis. Can J Psychiatry. 2003 Dec;48(11):756-61.

    Amato AA, Griggs RC. Unicorns, dragons, polymyositis, and other mythological beasts. Neurology. 2003 Aug 12;61(3):288-9.

    LeBoit PE. Pictures of a unicorn? Am J Dermatopathol. 2003 Feb;25(1):88-91

    Simon L. Research into the origins and characteristics of unicorns: mental illness as the unicorn. Ethical Hum Sci Serv. 2000 Fall-Winter;2(3):181-92.

    Howe EG. Unicorns, Carravaggio, and fetal surgery. J Clin Ethics. 2001 Winter;12(4):333-45.

    Ariew R. Leibniz on the unicorn and various other curiosities. Early Sci Med. 1998 Nov;3(4):267-88.

    Stahl FW. Unicorns revisited. Genetics. 1992 Dec;132(4):865-7.

    Foster PL. Directed mutation: between unicorns and goats. J Bacteriol. 1992 Mar;174(6):1711-6.

    Morreim EH. The law of nature and the law of the land: of horses, zebras, and unicorns. Pharos Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Med Soc. 1990 Spring;53(2):2-6.

    [No authors listed] Editorial: Why unicorns? Med J Aust. 1976 May 15;1(20):728-9.
    http://alanaragon.com/unicorns

    New goal: talk about unicorns in my dissertation. That actually helps smooth out a few pages.
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