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Advanced Glycation End products in food

JaneSnoweJaneSnowe Posts: 1,282Member Member Posts: 1,282Member Member
Amidst all the recent goings-on about sugar, I decided to see what in the world the anti-sugar people are going on about, especially when claims that sugar ages you came up. I found out there is research into something called Advanced Glycation End products (which makes AGEs a convenient acronym) and thought this would make an interesting discussion.

From here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3704564/
Modern diets are largely heat-processed and as a result contain high levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Dietary advanced glycation end products (dAGEs) are known to contribute to increased oxidant stress and inflammation, which are linked to the recent epidemics of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

This isn't about sugar per se since sugar is neither demonized nor singled out in the article but rather it discusses things like how AGEs are produced depending on food type and cooking method, amongst other related information.

Thoughts?

Replies

  • Need2Exerc1seNeed2Exerc1se Posts: 13,589Member Member Posts: 13,589Member Member
    From the study conclusions"
    The current dAGE database demonstrates that a significantly reduced intake of dAGEs can be achieved by increasing the consumption of fish, legumes, low-fat milk products, vegetables, fruits, and whole grains and by reducing intake of solid fats, fatty meats, full-fat dairy products, and highly processed foods.

    I don't know how relevant the data is for healthy individuals as most of the referenced studies look to be on diabetics, but this seems like the same dietary advice we've been given over and over.
  • JaneSnoweJaneSnowe Posts: 1,282Member Member Posts: 1,282Member Member
    From the study conclusions"
    The current dAGE database demonstrates that a significantly reduced intake of dAGEs can be achieved by increasing the consumption of fish, legumes, low-fat milk products, vegetables, fruits, and whole grains and by reducing intake of solid fats, fatty meats, full-fat dairy products, and highly processed foods.

    I don't know how relevant the data is for healthy individuals as most of the referenced studies look to be on diabetics, but this seems like the same dietary advice we've been given over and over.

    Oh yes, definitely it's not radical dietary advice. I just thought it was interesting that dry cooking vs moist cooking (e.g. steaming or poaching) makes a difference in AGE levels, as does using an acidic marinade, among other things.

    I'm not taking a position here, as if to say we need to change how we eat. I found it interesting and wanted other people's thoughts.
  • mommarnursemommarnurse Posts: 515Member, Premium Member Posts: 515Member, Premium Member
    JaneSnowe wrote: »
    Amidst all the recent goings-on about sugar, I decided to see what in the world the anti-sugar people are going on about, especially when claims that sugar ages you came up. I found out there is research into something called Advanced Glycation End products (which makes AGEs a convenient acronym) and thought this would make an interesting discussion.

    From here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3704564/
    Modern diets are largely heat-processed and as a result contain high levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Dietary advanced glycation end products (dAGEs) are known to contribute to increased oxidant stress and inflammation, which are linked to the recent epidemics of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

    This isn't about sugar per se since sugar is neither demonized nor singled out in the article but rather it discusses things like how AGEs are produced depending on food type and cooking method, amongst other related information.

    Thoughts?

    What? No,no,no. The term "link" here clearly means "correlation" and no *kitten*, they're correlated - the rise in diabetes and heart disease is from obesity, period.
    edited May 2016
  • JaneSnoweJaneSnowe Posts: 1,282Member Member Posts: 1,282Member Member
    JaneSnowe wrote: »
    Amidst all the recent goings-on about sugar, I decided to see what in the world the anti-sugar people are going on about, especially when claims that sugar ages you came up. I found out there is research into something called Advanced Glycation End products (which makes AGEs a convenient acronym) and thought this would make an interesting discussion.

    From here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3704564/
    Modern diets are largely heat-processed and as a result contain high levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Dietary advanced glycation end products (dAGEs) are known to contribute to increased oxidant stress and inflammation, which are linked to the recent epidemics of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

    This isn't about sugar per se since sugar is neither demonized nor singled out in the article but rather it discusses things like how AGEs are produced depending on food type and cooking method, amongst other related information.

    Thoughts?

    What? No,no,no. The term "link" here clearly means "correlation" and no *kitten*, they're correlated - the rise in diabetes and heart disease is from obesity, period.

    I don't quite follow what you're saying. Would you mind fleshing it out a bit?
  • Christine_72Christine_72 Posts: 16,074Member Member Posts: 16,074Member Member
    I'd like to know why they're recommending low fat dairy??
  • JaneSnoweJaneSnowe Posts: 1,282Member Member Posts: 1,282Member Member
    I'd like to know why they're recommending low fat dairy??

    Probably because of this:
    Animal-derived foods that are high in fat and protein are generally AGE-rich and prone to new AGE formation during cooking.

    Ya know, I posted the article because I'd never heard of AGEs before and thought it might be an interesting topic of conversation, but the more I think about it there are so many things that are proven to contribute to good health--exercise, getting enough sleep, proper nutrition, stress management, etc--I'm just going to focus on the big things and enjoy my full fat dairy and occasionally make it a chocolate milk. ;)
  • Christine_72Christine_72 Posts: 16,074Member Member Posts: 16,074Member Member
    Thanks.

    And same same :+1:
  • EvgeniZyntxEvgeniZyntx Posts: 24,424Member Member Posts: 24,424Member Member
    JaneSnowe wrote: »
    I'd like to know why they're recommending low fat dairy??

    Probably because of this:
    Animal-derived foods that are high in fat and protein are generally AGE-rich and prone to new AGE formation during cooking.

    Ya know, I posted the article because I'd never heard of AGEs before and thought it might be an interesting topic of conversation, but the more I think about it there are so many things that are proven to contribute to good health--exercise, getting enough sleep, proper nutrition, stress management, etc--I'm just going to focus on the big things and enjoy my full fat dairy and occasionally make it a chocolate milk. ;)

    Basically these by-products (and I dislike this acronym) can be considered to be addressed by the current recommendations against overcooking, grilling or frying your food. Browning food too much is in the class of "probably not best for health".

    Unless you are interested in the biology of the Maillard reaction the lesson here is "eat most fresh food, lots of vegetables" and don't overcook your food, keep "smoked" and other nitrate rich processed meats to a reasonable level. The actual research that the body doesn't manage these in a normal diet is ... absent.

    Focusing on the majors is more than sufficient.
  • JaneSnoweJaneSnowe Posts: 1,282Member Member Posts: 1,282Member Member
    JaneSnowe wrote: »
    I'd like to know why they're recommending low fat dairy??

    Probably because of this:
    Animal-derived foods that are high in fat and protein are generally AGE-rich and prone to new AGE formation during cooking.

    Ya know, I posted the article because I'd never heard of AGEs before and thought it might be an interesting topic of conversation, but the more I think about it there are so many things that are proven to contribute to good health--exercise, getting enough sleep, proper nutrition, stress management, etc--I'm just going to focus on the big things and enjoy my full fat dairy and occasionally make it a chocolate milk. ;)

    Basically these by-products (and I dislike this acronym) can be considered to be addressed by the current recommendations against overcooking, grilling or frying your food. Browning food too much is in the class of "probably not best for health".

    Unless you are interested in the biology of the Maillard reaction the lesson here is "eat most fresh food, lots of vegetables" and don't overcook your food, keep "smoked" and other nitrate rich processed meats to a reasonable level. The actual research that the body doesn't manage these in a normal diet is ... absent.

    Focusing on the majors is more than sufficient.

    :+1:
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