Protein Question

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I've seen it mentioned in several places that you should eat 0.6-0.8 g of protein for every lb of bodyweight. This would put me eating 135g of protein a day. I can barely manage to get up to 50g most days. Is that correct? Would I be better to try and up my protein intake?

I'm happily losing weight at a good pace for my size so this isn't about stalls or anything like that, now I've got the calorie counting down I'm looking into ensuring I get a good nutrient balance. Would increased protein be beneficial for my health?
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  • seska422
    seska422 Posts: 3,217 Member
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    The RDA for adequate protein for most adults is 0.8 grams per kilogram of ideal weight. That's about 46 grams of protein per day for non-pregnant, non-lactating women and 56 grams for men.

    Dietary Reference Intakes: Macronutrients

    The recommendation I've seen for optimal protein (especially if body building or losing weight) is 1 gram of protein per pound of lean body mass or 0.8 grams per pound of your ideal weight (middle of normal BMI).

    Personally, I aim for about 70 grams per day which falls between adequate and optimal but works for me.
  • rainbowbow
    rainbowbow Posts: 7,490 Member
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    I've seen it mentioned in several places that you should eat 0.6-0.8 g of protein for every lb of bodyweight. This would put me eating 135g of protein a day. I can barely manage to get up to 50g most days. Is that correct? Would I be better to try and up my protein intake?

    I'm happily losing weight at a good pace for my size so this isn't about stalls or anything like that, now I've got the calorie counting down I'm looking into ensuring I get a good nutrient balance. Would increased protein be beneficial for my health?

    The recommendation is actually 1g protein per KG body weight for sedentary individuals or .8-1.2g per pound of LEAN body mass in athletic individuals.
  • psuLemon
    psuLemon Posts: 38,413 MFP Moderator
    edited August 2016
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    The increased amount of protein will support a few thing; 1. increase chances of muscle maintenance, and 2. satiety. And if you can preserve muscle, you will being losing more fat, will have a tighter body and can help maintain metabolic functions. But it's definitely more important during weight loss. Personally, I would consider increasing protein.

    Side note, resistance training is the other part of the equation for muscle maintenance.
  • dkabambe
    dkabambe Posts: 544 Member
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    There is a lot of conflicting advice when it comes to protein amounts vs weight loss. Obviously you need a certain amount to function properly and though I don't know the figures 50g does sound low. Eating a decent amount of protein will help limit muscles loss as you lose weight as well, (though some is inevitable - unfortunately not all the weight loss is fat!).
  • psuLemon
    psuLemon Posts: 38,413 MFP Moderator
    edited August 2016
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    rainbowbow wrote: »
    I've seen it mentioned in several places that you should eat 0.6-0.8 g of protein for every lb of bodyweight. This would put me eating 135g of protein a day. I can barely manage to get up to 50g most days. Is that correct? Would I be better to try and up my protein intake?

    I'm happily losing weight at a good pace for my size so this isn't about stalls or anything like that, now I've got the calorie counting down I'm looking into ensuring I get a good nutrient balance. Would increased protein be beneficial for my health?

    The recommendation is actually 1g protein per KG body weight for sedentary individuals or .8-1.2g per pound of LEAN body mass in athletic individuals.

    And the RDA is based on weight maintenance.
  • robdowns1300
    robdowns1300 Posts: 152 Member
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    MFP has me at 143g! 175 pound man on slow bulk. (I know it's different than for ladies, only stating for balance.) It's darn hard to hit it. I've been touching it up with protein powder.
  • caradack1985
    caradack1985 Posts: 254 Member
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    seska422 wrote: »
    The RDA for adequate protein for most adults is 0.8 grams per kilogram of ideal weight. That's about 46 grams of protein per day for non-pregnant, non-lactating women and 56 grams for men.

    Dietary Reference Intakes: Macronutrients

    The recommendation I've seen for optimal protein (especially if body building or losing weight) is 1 gram of protein per pound of lean body mass or 0.8 grams per pound of your ideal weight (middle of normal BMI).

    Personally, I aim for about 70 grams per day which falls between adequate and optimal but works for me.

    OK, 0.8 g per pound of ideal body weight (which I've estimated at 120) would have me at 96g of protein a day, about twice my current consumption! Either way it looks like I do need to up my intake considerably. I really don't want to lose more muscle mass than I have to, partly because I will eventually be swapping to building muscle and partly because for health reasons I need every ounce of muscle I can spare, they're doing their own job plus the work of my ligaments.
  • rainbowbow
    rainbowbow Posts: 7,490 Member
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    seska422 wrote: »
    The RDA for adequate protein for most adults is 0.8 grams per kilogram of ideal weight. That's about 46 grams of protein per day for non-pregnant, non-lactating women and 56 grams for men.

    Dietary Reference Intakes: Macronutrients

    The recommendation I've seen for optimal protein (especially if body building or losing weight) is 1 gram of protein per pound of lean body mass or 0.8 grams per pound of your ideal weight (middle of normal BMI).

    Personally, I aim for about 70 grams per day which falls between adequate and optimal but works for me.

    OK, 0.8 g per pound of ideal body weight (which I've estimated at 120) would have me at 96g of protein a day, about twice my current consumption! Either way it looks like I do need to up my intake considerably. I really don't want to lose more muscle mass than I have to, partly because I will eventually be swapping to building muscle and partly because for health reasons I need every ounce of muscle I can spare, they're doing their own job plus the work of my ligaments.

    that sounds about right to me.

    The most important factor (along with consuming enough protein) is consistent strength or resistance training during this period.
  • psuLemon
    psuLemon Posts: 38,413 MFP Moderator
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    seska422 wrote: »
    The RDA for adequate protein for most adults is 0.8 grams per kilogram of ideal weight. That's about 46 grams of protein per day for non-pregnant, non-lactating women and 56 grams for men.

    Dietary Reference Intakes: Macronutrients

    The recommendation I've seen for optimal protein (especially if body building or losing weight) is 1 gram of protein per pound of lean body mass or 0.8 grams per pound of your ideal weight (middle of normal BMI).

    Personally, I aim for about 70 grams per day which falls between adequate and optimal but works for me.

    OK, 0.8 g per pound of ideal body weight (which I've estimated at 120) would have me at 96g of protein a day, about twice my current consumption! Either way it looks like I do need to up my intake considerably. I really don't want to lose more muscle mass than I have to, partly because I will eventually be swapping to building muscle and partly because for health reasons I need every ounce of muscle I can spare, they're doing their own job plus the work of my ligaments.

    As an FYI, the .6 to .8g is a translation of what the studies say; .8 - 1g per lb of lean body mass. If you are lean, it would be up to 1g per lb of weight.
  • caradack1985
    caradack1985 Posts: 254 Member
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    I'm doing convict conditioning twice a week and low impact aerobics three times a week.
  • psuLemon
    psuLemon Posts: 38,413 MFP Moderator
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    MFP has me at 143g! 175 pound man on slow bulk. (I know it's different than for ladies, only stating for balance.) It's darn hard to hit it. I've been touching it up with protein powder.

    MFP is based off of government guidelines (20% of calories), which is actually based on weight maintenance. During a cut, you need more; during a bulk, you need a good combination of protein and carbs.
  • psuLemon
    psuLemon Posts: 38,413 MFP Moderator
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    I'm doing convict conditioning twice a week and low impact aerobics three times a week.

    That is probably a good start. At some point you might want to considering one of the programs in this list (yours is in there too) if it works with your heath issues.

    http://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/10332083/which-lifting-program-is-the-best-for-you/p1
  • kwtilbury
    kwtilbury Posts: 1,234 Member
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    psulemon wrote: »
    The increased amount of protein will support a few thing; 1. increase chances of muscle maintenance, and 2. satiety. And if you can preserve muscle, you will being losing more fat, will have a tighter body and can help maintain metabolic functions. But it's definitely more important during weight loss. Personally, I would consider increasing protein.

    Side note, resistance training is the other part of the equation for muscle maintenance.

    This. I average a little over 1 kg per pound of body weight, simply because I feel more satisfied eating extra protein than carbs.
  • robdowns1300
    robdowns1300 Posts: 152 Member
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    psulemon wrote: »
    MFP has me at 143g! 175 pound man on slow bulk. (I know it's different than for ladies, only stating for balance.) It's darn hard to hit it. I've been touching it up with protein powder.

    MFP is based off of government guidelines (20% of calories), which is actually based on weight maintenance. During a cut, you need more; during a bulk, you need a good combination of protein and carbs.

    Still working on the carbs. hard to hit that too. (356 for me) Losing weight was way easier!
  • caradack1985
    caradack1985 Posts: 254 Member
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    I've upped my protein allowance on here to 90g, which is just under ideal. Now I just need to find ways to hit that allowance!
  • Michael190lbs
    Michael190lbs Posts: 1,510 Member
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    open your diary- I find it harder to hit my carbs than Protein
  • cee134
    cee134 Posts: 33,711 Member
    edited August 2016
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    The RDA recommends (.36 per pound of body weight). The 46 g for females is based on the reference weight of a 126 lbs woman.

    Are you vegetarian? It is not recommended to eat more then 6 oz of meat a day (won't go into that here). So 6 oz of skinless chicken is around 50 g and 250ish calories. The rest you can get from whole grains, protein shakes, legumes, and beans (there is also some protein in vegetables and fruit).
  • caradack1985
    caradack1985 Posts: 254 Member
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    I've opened my diary, although you need to know that I eat OMAD. I'm not vegetarian but I don't eat a massive amount of meat and when I do its red meat rather then white. I eat a fair amount of veg, but I could definitely up my bean and legume amounts.
  • caradack1985
    caradack1985 Posts: 254 Member
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    Also I've eaten a fair enough of chocolate the last few days but that's a time of the month thing, it will be going back down to normal in the next day or two!
  • psuLemon
    psuLemon Posts: 38,413 MFP Moderator
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    cee134 wrote: »
    The RDA recommends (.36 per pound of body weight). The 46 g for females is based on the reference weight of a 126 lbs woman.

    Are you vegetarian? It is not recommended to eat more then 6 oz of meat a day (won't go into that here). So 6 oz of skinless chicken is around 50 g and 250ish calories. The rest you can get from whole grains, protein shakes, legumes, and beans (there is also some protein in vegetables and fruit).

    That is false.


    OP, what is OMAD? And below is a list of protein sources.


    http://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/926789/protein-sources