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Splenda Allergy

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  • Treece68
    Treece68 Posts: 780 Member
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  • singingflutelady
    singingflutelady Posts: 8,736 Member
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    psulemon wrote: »
    Just my family doctor. First she thought lupus. I now use stevia. I just wondered if anyone else had noticed anything.

    Your family doctor actually told you you have a splenda allergy causing you joint pain?

    Get a new doctor.

    Why would a person leave their doctor if the doctor conducted an elimination diet protocol correctly and found some correlation between pain and a specific ingredient in foods? My wife found several issues through with foods and her medical condition through elimination diets, working with doctors (her last one was through a GI doctor). Hell, I know a lot of people allergic to so many weird things, like pineapple, strawberries, pork, etc.. So, it's really not that unreasonable.

    You guys are lucky. My GI is clueless ( he recommended red meat and spinach when I was severely anaemic even though I have crohn's). I told him I couldn't eat those and he said why? Um low residue/fiber and no red meat is pretty standard for crohn's patients and eating those would be very painful so it's shocking a GI wouldn't know that! That's why I don't trust doctors for nutritional information.
  • psuLemon
    psuLemon Posts: 38,413 MFP Moderator
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    psulemon wrote: »
    Just my family doctor. First she thought lupus. I now use stevia. I just wondered if anyone else had noticed anything.

    Your family doctor actually told you you have a splenda allergy causing you joint pain?

    Get a new doctor.

    Why would a person leave their doctor if the doctor conducted an elimination diet protocol correctly and found some correlation between pain and a specific ingredient in foods? My wife found several issues through with foods and her medical condition through elimination diets, working with doctors (her last one was through a GI doctor). Hell, I know a lot of people allergic to so many weird things, like pineapple, strawberries, pork, etc.. So, it's really not that unreasonable.

    You guys are lucky. My GI is clueless ( he recommended red meat and spinach when I was severely anaemic even though I have crohn's). I told him I couldn't eat those and he said why? Um low residue/fiber and no red meat is pretty standard for crohn's patients and eating those would be very painful so it's shocking a GI wouldn't know that! That's why I don't trust doctors for nutritional information.

    I always trust but verify and often do research prior to my wife's appoints. At this point, we have so many specialist, it's required to ensure that everyone is on the same page. I just think it's ridiculous that comments are made without knowing anything about a doctor. Yes, many doctors are not trained, but if they understand and follow protocols correctly, than they are at least knowledgeable enough to make an assessment.

    Ironically, my areas has one of a small handful of dedicated doctors in POTS, and he was terrible with nutrition. My wife's electrophysiologist was much more informed. Although, I did surprise him on my research on electrolyte drinks.
  • laurens47
    laurens47 Posts: 117 Member
    edited November 2016
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    psulemon wrote: »
    Just my family doctor. First she thought lupus. I now use stevia. I just wondered if anyone else had noticed anything.

    Your family doctor actually told you you have a splenda allergy causing you joint pain?

    Get a new doctor.

    Why would a person leave their doctor if the doctor conducted an elimination diet protocol correctly and found some correlation between pain and a specific ingredient in foods? My wife found several issues through with foods and her medical condition through elimination diets, working with doctors (her last one was through a GI doctor). Hell, I know a lot of people allergic to so many weird things, like pineapple, strawberries, pork, etc.. So, it's really not that unreasonable.

    OP, if you did an elimination diet and found a reaction, I would cut it out. There is no reason to incorporate foods that potentially cause some kind of reaction. Try a few other sweeteners to see how you react to them. If that doesn't work, maybe try real sugar.

    This. Plus, Splenda is artificial anyway. Try real sugar or honey.
  • GottaBurnEmAll
    GottaBurnEmAll Posts: 7,722 Member
    edited November 2016
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    psulemon wrote: »
    Just my family doctor. First she thought lupus. I now use stevia. I just wondered if anyone else had noticed anything.

    Your family doctor actually told you you have a splenda allergy causing you joint pain?

    Get a new doctor.

    Why would a person leave their doctor if the doctor conducted an elimination diet protocol correctly and found some correlation between pain and a specific ingredient in foods? My wife found several issues through with foods and her medical condition through elimination diets, working with doctors (her last one was through a GI doctor). Hell, I know a lot of people allergic to so many weird things, like pineapple, strawberries, pork, etc.. So, it's really not that unreasonable.

    OP, if you did an elimination diet and found a reaction, I would cut it out. There is no reason to incorporate foods that potentially cause some kind of reaction. Try a few other sweeteners to see how you react to them. If that doesn't work, maybe try real sugar.

    I didn't presume an elimination protocol. I have nothing against them, and in my experience GP's don't run them. That's why I didn't jump to that conclusion.

    OP, did you do one? How long did you run it for? What foods did you eliminate? Are you able to tolerate corn?

    Did you ever run a true elimination protocol by adding back to test?
  • psuLemon
    psuLemon Posts: 38,413 MFP Moderator
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    psulemon wrote: »
    Just my family doctor. First she thought lupus. I now use stevia. I just wondered if anyone else had noticed anything.

    Your family doctor actually told you you have a splenda allergy causing you joint pain?

    Get a new doctor.

    Why would a person leave their doctor if the doctor conducted an elimination diet protocol correctly and found some correlation between pain and a specific ingredient in foods? My wife found several issues through with foods and her medical condition through elimination diets, working with doctors (her last one was through a GI doctor). Hell, I know a lot of people allergic to so many weird things, like pineapple, strawberries, pork, etc.. So, it's really not that unreasonable.

    OP, if you did an elimination diet and found a reaction, I would cut it out. There is no reason to incorporate foods that potentially cause some kind of reaction. Try a few other sweeteners to see how you react to them. If that doesn't work, maybe try real sugar.

    I didn't presume an elimination protocol. I have nothing against them, and in my experience GP's don't run them. That's why I didn't jump to that conclusion.

    OP, did you do one? How long did you run it for? What foods did you eliminate? Are you able to tolerate corn?

    Did you ever run a true elimination protocol by adding back to test?

    The OP stated that her doctor started to eliminate it (maybe you missed that post).
  • GottaBurnEmAll
    GottaBurnEmAll Posts: 7,722 Member
    edited November 2016
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    psulemon wrote: »
    psulemon wrote: »
    Just my family doctor. First she thought lupus. I now use stevia. I just wondered if anyone else had noticed anything.

    Your family doctor actually told you you have a splenda allergy causing you joint pain?

    Get a new doctor.

    Why would a person leave their doctor if the doctor conducted an elimination diet protocol correctly and found some correlation between pain and a specific ingredient in foods? My wife found several issues through with foods and her medical condition through elimination diets, working with doctors (her last one was through a GI doctor). Hell, I know a lot of people allergic to so many weird things, like pineapple, strawberries, pork, etc.. So, it's really not that unreasonable.

    OP, if you did an elimination diet and found a reaction, I would cut it out. There is no reason to incorporate foods that potentially cause some kind of reaction. Try a few other sweeteners to see how you react to them. If that doesn't work, maybe try real sugar.

    I didn't presume an elimination protocol. I have nothing against them, and in my experience GP's don't run them. That's why I didn't jump to that conclusion.

    OP, did you do one? How long did you run it for? What foods did you eliminate? Are you able to tolerate corn?

    Did you ever run a true elimination protocol by adding back to test?

    The OP stated that her doctor started to eliminate it (maybe you missed that post).

    She never said she added it back. That's not a full elimination protocol. In a true elimination protocol, you go down to a bare bones diet of pretty much well-known none-triggering foods and slowly reintroduce different foods one by one.

    This doesn't sound like they ran the protocol that way.
  • psuLemon
    psuLemon Posts: 38,413 MFP Moderator
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    psulemon wrote: »
    psulemon wrote: »
    Just my family doctor. First she thought lupus. I now use stevia. I just wondered if anyone else had noticed anything.

    Your family doctor actually told you you have a splenda allergy causing you joint pain?

    Get a new doctor.

    Why would a person leave their doctor if the doctor conducted an elimination diet protocol correctly and found some correlation between pain and a specific ingredient in foods? My wife found several issues through with foods and her medical condition through elimination diets, working with doctors (her last one was through a GI doctor). Hell, I know a lot of people allergic to so many weird things, like pineapple, strawberries, pork, etc.. So, it's really not that unreasonable.

    OP, if you did an elimination diet and found a reaction, I would cut it out. There is no reason to incorporate foods that potentially cause some kind of reaction. Try a few other sweeteners to see how you react to them. If that doesn't work, maybe try real sugar.

    I didn't presume an elimination protocol. I have nothing against them, and in my experience GP's don't run them. That's why I didn't jump to that conclusion.

    OP, did you do one? How long did you run it for? What foods did you eliminate? Are you able to tolerate corn?

    Did you ever run a true elimination protocol by adding back to test?

    The OP stated that her doctor started to eliminate it (maybe you missed that post).

    She never said she added it back. That's not a full elimination protocol.

    I recognize that.

    But not how that would still lead to a recommendation of getting a new doctors. There isn't even enough information to make that assessment.
  • GottaBurnEmAll
    GottaBurnEmAll Posts: 7,722 Member
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    psulemon wrote: »
    psulemon wrote: »
    psulemon wrote: »
    Just my family doctor. First she thought lupus. I now use stevia. I just wondered if anyone else had noticed anything.

    Your family doctor actually told you you have a splenda allergy causing you joint pain?

    Get a new doctor.

    Why would a person leave their doctor if the doctor conducted an elimination diet protocol correctly and found some correlation between pain and a specific ingredient in foods? My wife found several issues through with foods and her medical condition through elimination diets, working with doctors (her last one was through a GI doctor). Hell, I know a lot of people allergic to so many weird things, like pineapple, strawberries, pork, etc.. So, it's really not that unreasonable.

    OP, if you did an elimination diet and found a reaction, I would cut it out. There is no reason to incorporate foods that potentially cause some kind of reaction. Try a few other sweeteners to see how you react to them. If that doesn't work, maybe try real sugar.

    I didn't presume an elimination protocol. I have nothing against them, and in my experience GP's don't run them. That's why I didn't jump to that conclusion.

    OP, did you do one? How long did you run it for? What foods did you eliminate? Are you able to tolerate corn?

    Did you ever run a true elimination protocol by adding back to test?

    The OP stated that her doctor started to eliminate it (maybe you missed that post).

    She never said she added it back. That's not a full elimination protocol.

    I recognize that.

    But not how that would still lead to a recommendation of getting a new doctors. There isn't even enough information to make that assessment.

    Hey, I'm as glad as you are that she's without joint pain. No arguments. I'm not against elimination protocols. I did one myself this past year while I was suffering from the fallout from being on antibiotics. They are a very helpful tool.

    I don't think Splenda is behind her issues. If anything caused her problems, I tend to think it could be the maltodextrin. Corn's a bugger. I know both of my kids had trouble with it when they were younger and we had to avoid it for years.

    It's good her doctor took her concerns seriously and ran tests, I'll give him that.

    However, saying she's "allergic" to Splenda? I'm not so sure that's a valid medical assessment based on an improperly used diagnostic tool.
  • ronjsteele1
    ronjsteele1 Posts: 1,064 Member
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    psulemon wrote: »
    psulemon wrote: »
    psulemon wrote: »
    Just my family doctor. First she thought lupus. I now use stevia. I just wondered if anyone else had noticed anything.

    Your family doctor actually told you you have a splenda allergy causing you joint pain?

    Get a new doctor.

    Why would a person leave their doctor if the doctor conducted an elimination diet protocol correctly and found some correlation between pain and a specific ingredient in foods? My wife found several issues through with foods and her medical condition through elimination diets, working with doctors (her last one was through a GI doctor). Hell, I know a lot of people allergic to so many weird things, like pineapple, strawberries, pork, etc.. So, it's really not that unreasonable.

    OP, if you did an elimination diet and found a reaction, I would cut it out. There is no reason to incorporate foods that potentially cause some kind of reaction. Try a few other sweeteners to see how you react to them. If that doesn't work, maybe try real sugar.

    I didn't presume an elimination protocol. I have nothing against them, and in my experience GP's don't run them. That's why I didn't jump to that conclusion.

    OP, did you do one? How long did you run it for? What foods did you eliminate? Are you able to tolerate corn?

    Did you ever run a true elimination protocol by adding back to test?

    The OP stated that her doctor started to eliminate it (maybe you missed that post).

    She never said she added it back. That's not a full elimination protocol.

    I recognize that.

    But not how that would still lead to a recommendation of getting a new doctors. There isn't even enough information to make that assessment.

    Hey, I'm as glad as you are that she's without joint pain. No arguments. I'm not against elimination protocols. I did one myself this past year while I was suffering from the fallout from being on antibiotics. They are a very helpful tool.

    I don't think Splenda is behind her issues. If anything caused her problems, I tend to think it could be the maltodextrin. Corn's a bugger. I know both of my kids had trouble with it when they were younger and we had to avoid it for years.

    It's good her doctor took her concerns seriously and ran tests, I'll give him that.

    However, saying she's "allergic" to Splenda? I'm not so sure that's a valid medical assessment based on an improperly used diagnostic tool.

    She said they removed splenda and her joint pain went away. While that's not a "true" elimination diet, it's enough information for her to know she shouldn't use it. However, I doubt it's maltodextrine because 1) it's made from corn and in just about stinking everything. 2) If her joint pain completely went away and she's still getting maltodextrine in other foods (and she likely is given everything that it's in) it would stand to reason if that were the issue that she would still have joint pain. OR if both splenda and maltodextrine were causing her joint pain, one would expect she would perhaps have less joint pain without the splenda, but still some because of getting maltodextrine. So in this case, the assessment they made for her is most likely correct.

    That said, I feel for you having had to go through the corn allergy. That is a stinking bugger! Corn is in so much stuff and so much stuff is made on equipment that uses corn everything (starch, powder, fillers, etc etc). For all of the allergies we had to deal with here, I am so very thankful corn wasn't one of them!!
  • LAWoman72
    LAWoman72 Posts: 2,846 Member
    edited November 2016
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    What? Really? I have NEVER heard of this.

    I'm not discounting it. Anything is possible. It's just not something I've encountered at all. For me personally (sample size of one): I do fine with Splenda.

    I hope you feel better, OP. Joint pain is miserable.
  • SLLRunner
    SLLRunner Posts: 12,942 Member
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    Anybody else find Splenda gives them joint pain?

    No. But I can't do maltodextrin because it gives me serious digestive issues.

    I stick to Stevia. :)
  • SLLRunner
    SLLRunner Posts: 12,942 Member
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    Just my family doctor. First she thought lupus. I now use stevia. I just wondered if anyone else had noticed anything.

    Your family doctor actually told you you have a splenda allergy causing you joint pain?

    Get a new doctor.

    Yep. I agree.
  • jasonpreagan
    jasonpreagan Posts: 1 Member
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    You have any medical or scientific data to actually back your reply? Perhaps you have advanced medical training. Please feel free to explain why her doctor is wrong? Use data please.