Need advice from the ladies... (birth control help!)

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13

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  • mayafit405
    mayafit405 Posts: 61 Member
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    Btw lol any news on when male birth control will hit the market? :p
  • JaydedMiss
    JaydedMiss Posts: 4,286 Member
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    birth control gives me rashes it sucks being 23 without being able to be on birth control. Ihave PCOS so it never worried me before i was obese and unlikely to have kids......But after losing nearly 100 pounds my periods seem to be back on a schedule so itd be nice to be able to be on BCP...Especially since my libido is through the roof now...>.>

    This threads been useful to read good luck on your decision sorry im no help XD
  • gamerbabe14
    gamerbabe14 Posts: 876 Member
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    I had a stroke after taking bc pills for a year and a half. I am on Skyla now which has been great! No hormones, IUD. I'm 30, kids are in the picture (maybe) in the near future.

    I'll just say this...did you get an MRI done after your aura? I persisted to get MRI after my Dr. said it was probably just an aura, turns out it was a stroke. I lost vision in my left eye for about 5-10 mins and had an aura afterward followed by a severe headache.
  • PaulaWallaDingDong
    PaulaWallaDingDong Posts: 4,641 Member
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    I had a stroke after taking bc pills for a year and a half. I am on Skyla now which has been great! No hormones, IUD. I'm 30, kids are in the picture (maybe) in the near future.

    I'll just say this...did you get an MRI done after your aura? I persisted to get MRI after my Dr. said it was probably just an aura, turns out it was a stroke. I lost vision in my left eye for about 5-10 mins and had an aura afterward followed by a severe headache.

    Skyla is hormonal birth control. Progestin only.
  • wellthenwhat
    wellthenwhat Posts: 526 Member
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    I am going to get a copper IUD soon. My doctor really recommends it because it isn't hormonal.
  • gamerbabe14
    gamerbabe14 Posts: 876 Member
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    Skyla is hormonal birth control. Progestin only.

    Yes apologies, non-estrogen.
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 27,952 Member
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    So I can't speak to artificial methods, but if you want to get off hormones and go the natural route, there are a few highly effective methods you can check out. I personally use a sympto-thermal with hormonal cross check (I use the clear blue easy monitor to check estrogen rise/lh surge) and plot the signs on the Kindara app. I've used this method to get pregnant when we were ready and to avoid pregnancy (using it ten years).

    "Taking Charge of Your Fertility " would be a good book to get started with sympto thermal. The creighton university's website is great for info on NaPro technology method, and Marquette University's for the hormonal method (the monitor. Also a great FB group with lots of info).
    Sparrowly wrote: »
    If your body has issues with hormonal birth control, you could learn Fertility Awareness. It's simply a matter of tracking your body's symptoms so that you know what days you are fertile, and avoid unprotected sex on those days. It's free (unless you use Clear Blue method) and works with your body instead of trying a one size fits all pill that may or may not cause a blood clot or stroke.

    A woman's body temperature, discharge, hormone levels, and cervix position change during the cycle while gearing up for ovulation. If you look at some of those symptoms, you can pinpoint exactly what is going on in your body. It's science.

    I am 36, never used hormonal birth control, and I have one planned child. I chart daily cervical discharge and can see exactly when I'm about to ovulate. Generally, a woman is fertile about 5 days a month! You only need to avoid unprotected sex during those fertile days.

    Taking Charge of Your Fertility is a helpful book on this topic.

    I used fertility awareness successfully with my ex-husband for a good 10 years or so.

    My OH has had a vasectomy and I prefer that.
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 27,952 Member
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    annacole94 wrote: »
    My problem with using natural methods is it tells me not to have sex for the week of the month I want to have sex.

    Ultimately, the husband preferred the dreaded vasectomy to a lifetime sentence of condoms. Which haven't been mentioned, but are an option.

    You just have to get more creative with "sex" that week ;)
  • rogerlamar6
    rogerlamar6 Posts: 142 Member
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    For my wife, an IUD worked wonderfully for the eight years after we had our four amazing children. Starting in 2002, her choice of birth control was to stop having sex permanently. That was highly effective although not great for our marriage. She has since passed through menopause but birth control is irrelevant. So.....suppressing your libido is always an option. (Still married after 32 years.)
  • annacole94
    annacole94 Posts: 997 Member
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    kshama2001 wrote: »
    annacole94 wrote: »
    My problem with using natural methods is it tells me not to have sex for the week of the month I want to have sex.

    Ultimately, the husband preferred the dreaded vasectomy to a lifetime sentence of condoms. Which haven't been mentioned, but are an option.

    You just have to get more creative with "sex" that week ;)

    Again: vasectomies are great. Natural birth control methods were not for me. I did chart to get pregnant, so I fully understand how it works and what is involved - I simply did not like it or want to continue it.
  • H_Ock12
    H_Ock12 Posts: 1,152 Member
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    I had Nexplanon for a little over two years....it did nothing to stop my ovarian cysts, contributed to awful mood swings, and my periods were unpredictable. I went back to the Depo...no periods, no mood swings, no cysts...life is grand again.
  • Supercatie80
    Supercatie80 Posts: 1,802 Member
    edited April 2017
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    @Megan91384 Have you been tracking your migraines and possible triggers? I've been on bc (orthotricylen lo, tri-nessa lo, and some other similar one) since I was 19 (now 34). I started having migraines this past summer with a visual aura. Everyone was stumped, doc did an MRI (even had an aura while in the MRI) and it came back completely normal (good to rule out other issues though). No family history of migraine. I started wracking my brain for what changed around the time I started getting migraines. My diet hadn't changed, I didn't move, my exercise was the same, work conditions were the same, etc. The only thing I could come up with was I had a tooth filling replaced about 1 month before I started getting migraines and my bite wasn't quite right. I went back to the dentist and had him grind the filling down a bit more and within 2 weeks, the migraines went away. I haven't had one since. *knocks on every piece of wood she can find* I used a phone app called Migraine Buddy to track triggers and migraines which was great and would have been awesome if I had a normal trigger.

    On the BC route, there's a well tested natural planning method that uses body temperature. It's a phone app with subscription that tracks body temp. It's been found to be just as effective as the pill. The yearly subscription comes out to about $6USD per month and you get a free basal thermometer. You can check it out here: https://www.naturalcycles.com/en
    It sounds interesting to me and thought I might try it. I've been having the low libido issues that others have mentioned on the pill.

    @JeepHair77 and @annacole94 On the wanting sex when you're fertile note, of course you're more horny when you're fertile. We are still animals. You're designed to want sex when you are most likely to get pregnant. Yay for procreation of the species!
  • StarvingDiva
    StarvingDiva Posts: 1,107 Member
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    I haven't been on birth control since 2007, this past year my doctor said I had to go on it after my surgery because they didn't want me getting pregnant for at least 18 months, so I chose paragard because there are no hormones in it. Other than insertion (which is easier for people who have had kids) I have not had kids so it wasn't the most pleasant experience albeit not the worse either, its been fine. You don't feel it, the first couple periods are a bit heavier but after that everything is back to normal. I've had no issues. The other IUDs do have hormones so just so you are aware. Paragard is the only one without added hormones.
  • FreyasRebirth
    FreyasRebirth Posts: 514 Member
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    annacole94 wrote: »
    My problem with using natural methods is it tells me not to have sex for the week of the month I want to have sex.

    Me too. If we avoided that week, we'd likely just never have sex.

    My mother got pregnant after tubal ligation so DH got a vasectomy. I liked the idea of being able to check for sperm afterward, for assurance that the procedure was successful. We made sure to do the follow up to be sure that his count dropped to zero, most "failures" happen when people assume it worked when it is either too early or something was missed. It wasn't too bad and I was having procedures on my cervix for dysplasia at the same time so we didn't have additional 'down time'.
  • misskarne
    misskarne Posts: 1,765 Member
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    Ah, the old "migraine with aura, GTFO off the pill now!" moment. Been there, done that - just a month or so ago, actually.

    I opted for the depo provera shot, mostly because I am strongly opposed to the concept of something being implanted under my skin *shrieks and shudders* and ain't nobody shoving anything up there *crosses legs*.

    But then I also use birth control for cramp control, rather than contraception, so my take is probably different to yours. As for side effects, well, it's been six weeks since I got the shot and I haven't noticed any so far.
  • TheJourneyToFabulous
    TheJourneyToFabulous Posts: 381 Member
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    I have the mirena, other than being uncomfortable going in I have had no issues, I dont bleed but do get the symptoms every month. Id recommend it
  • Golbat
    Golbat Posts: 276 Member
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    I have the Mirena and I absolutely love it. I used to have hte Paraguard and it made my periods more painful and heavier. But with the Mirena I just spot a little each month, and have no discomfort. I also had terrible migraines from the Pill. I get migraines somewhat no matter what, but they've been much more rare these days - though that might be because I'm getting older.

    Good luck - it's a hard decision.
  • YvetteK2015
    YvetteK2015 Posts: 653 Member
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    I'm on the Depo Provera shot, which is progesterone only. I've been on that for well over 10 years, specifically to treat hormonal migraines. I can't take anything with estrogen because it makes my migraines 10x worse. The depo just shut down those hormonal migraines. I'll be on this until i'm in my 50's. Added benefit of zero period, no cramps, no mood swings. However, I did bleed everyday for a year before it completely stopped. But it was so worth going through all that, for me anyway.
  • victoria_1024
    victoria_1024 Posts: 915 Member
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    janjunie wrote: »
    Sparrowly wrote: »
    If your body has issues with hormonal birth control, you could learn Fertility Awareness. It's simply a matter of tracking your body's symptoms so that you know what days you are fertile, and avoid unprotected sex on those days. It's free (unless you use Clear Blue method) and works with your body instead of trying a one size fits all pill that may or may not cause a blood clot or stroke.

    A woman's body temperature, discharge, hormone levels, and cervix position change during the cycle while gearing up for ovulation. If you look at some of those symptoms, you can pinpoint exactly what is going on in your body. It's science.

    I am 36, never used hormonal birth control, and I have one planned child. I chart daily cervical discharge and can see exactly when I'm about to ovulate. Generally, a woman is fertile about 5 days a month! You only need to avoid unprotected sex during those fertile days.

    Taking Charge of Your Fertility is a helpful book on this topic.

    I know someone who did that, they ended up having 5 kids, ,when they only planned for 3.

    Hahaha yep been there! We were using natural family planning after I had my 3rd baby. I am extremely familiar with my cycles and tracking ovulation because we tried for over 2 years to get pregnant with our first. Unfortunately one cycle I ended up ovulating way later than normal and bam! 4th baby lol. We've learned not to rely on that method anymore!!

    My husband's vasectomies kept getting canceled. He kept taking the day off work and at the last minute it would get canceled for random things (doctor called into surgery, problem with insurance form, etc). So we got tired of waiting and I got a mirena. It is still relatively new so I can't give much of an opinion yet. I have many friends who like both the mirena and Paraguard.
  • KosmosKitten
    KosmosKitten Posts: 10,476 Member
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    Here's my experience for those that were wanting to know:

    I was on various forms of the pill from the time I was 18 up until I turned 26. I got pregnant in 2011, had our son and decided that I did not want to go back on hormonal forms of birth control because I did not appreciate how it made me feel or the fact that it wasn't really diminishing the time I experienced my period, but increasing it.

    So the options that were available when I lived overseas were hormonal birth control, the shot or two types of IUD. I chose the non-hormonal form (Paragard) and had it placed in 2012. It was mostly great, I had no problems with it in the beginning. The only downside was that my period was super heavy and unpleasant, but at the expense of being shorter than it traditionally was, which I suppose is an upside.

    I kept it in place from 2012 to roughly 2015 when I started bleeding in between periods. I had a routine exam and they determined that the reason for the bleeding was that my IUD was actually embedding itself further into the uterus and had actually slipped from its original position. The gynecologist actually remarked that he was amazed that I hadn't become pregnant again because of how he found the device and how long it appeared to have been in that position.

    So after that fiasco I decided to have my tubes tied. It was easier than trying to have "the conversation" with my husband about it and honestly, it's my choice not to have anymore children (he wanted more), so it should fall on me and be my responsibility to maintain that. I had them tied in November 2015 and have never looked back. So far, I've had no problems and it's way nicer than having to worry about a device "slipping" or the way that hormonal birth control always made me feel (crazy, in short).

    The choice is ultimately yours, but I definitely did not mind the IUD when I had it. It didn't hurt, but it kind of sucked that I had to have it removed when it slipped from the correct position.

    BTW, I was only 30 when I had my tubes tied. I'm guessing I was just fortunate that I found a doctor who, while concerned that I was making the decision early on did not tell me he wouldn't proceed with it. He did ask me quite a few times though if I was absolutely sure that I wanted it done, lol.