Eating healthy around un-healthy people.

I've noticed how pushed on me sugar is by my family and friends. The "just have a little bit" and "but it's your favorite" combined with "but I made/got it for you."
Not only that but for me I have to buy my own food everywhere I go. Staying healthy is hard when people make dinner for you but you have to say no thanks and have a smoothie.
It also dosent help that food labels don't show daily percentage of sugar in items or that a granola bar (supposedly good for me) has 18g of sugar in it.

Anyone have advice for a girl on a budget that can't afford to be healthy at other people's homes?
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Replies

  • kgirlhart
    kgirlhart Posts: 4,970 Member
    You can either not eat at other people's homes, or not worry about the sugar. Unless you have a medical reason to limit sugar it is not going to hurt you if you stay at your calorie goal. My advice is don't make it harder than it has to be. And I also have to wonder how much sugar is in your smoothie. Most of them have a lot of sugar.
  • crazyycatlady1
    crazyycatlady1 Posts: 292 Member
    The odds are pretty good that the smoothie isn't all that much less in calories than a small meal, or a half portion of a meal.

    In the summer months I do a lot of green smoothies and they can easily top 500 calories!
  • BlueSkyShoal
    BlueSkyShoal Posts: 325 Member
    Are you living at home? That can make it harder to make your own food choices (at least without a family ruckus). How old are you?

    To a lot of people food = love. They get food for you, or make it for you, as an expression of love, and then can be hurt when you turn them down. It may be useful to sit down family members who push food at you--NOT at a meal time when drama is already brewing--and explain that although you appreciate the thought behind their food-offerings, you have decided to change your diet. So, although you love them right back, you are not going to be eating [examples of food they tend to push on you.]

    Personally I would not ask for or expect them to cook something special for me if they tend to go for high calorie meals. But, you can either eat a small portion of the high calorie stuff or, as you're doing, make your own meals.

    Have you considered offering to make some meals for the whole family (assuming you live with them) yourself? It is just about as easy as making something just for you, and if it tastes good enough then maybe they will be more willing to make low calorie stuff.
  • heiliskrimsli
    heiliskrimsli Posts: 735 Member
    Are you living at home? That can make it harder to make your own food choices (at least without a family ruckus). How old are you?

    To a lot of people food = love. They get food for you, or make it for you, as an expression of love, and then can be hurt when you turn them down. It may be useful to sit down family members who push food at you--NOT at a meal time when drama is already brewing--and explain that although you appreciate the thought behind their food-offerings, you have decided to change your diet. So, although you love them right back, you are not going to be eating [examples of food they tend to push on you.]

    Personally I would not ask for or expect them to cook something special for me if they tend to go for high calorie meals. But, you can either eat a small portion of the high calorie stuff or, as you're doing, make your own meals.

    Have you considered offering to make some meals for the whole family (assuming you live with them) yourself? It is just about as easy as making something just for you, and if it tastes good enough then maybe they will be more willing to make low calorie stuff.

    My family loves to push food, and have continued to do it even after talking to them. Sometimes you just have to start saying "No, thank you" and let them deal with their own feelings. It's hard with family, but you get used to it.

    Coworkers are often even more rude and insistent about food, especially when someone brings in doughnuts, cookies, or a cake from the grocery store for someone's birthday. But there also it's another indication that you just need to be forceful. Say "No" and mean it.

    Also why do people say "at home" to mean "with your parents"? Of course I live at home. Everyone lives at home. The fact that you live there is what makes it home!
  • TeaBea
    TeaBea Posts: 14,517 Member
    "Healthy" is so subjective. Your definition doesn't necessarily match anyone else's. There is so much crap information out there; internet, magazines, diet of the month books, etc. The definition keeps changing. It's hard to know what's true.

    It's great you want to be healthier. This means making better choices. But I don't think it means making perfect choices 100% of the time. Each one of us decides how much is enough.

    I'm never going to be desert free or snack free for the rest of my life. That's just not practical for me. So losing weight also includes a desert (sometimes) and a snack (sometimes)......but overall I eat healthier.
  • inertiastrength
    inertiastrength Posts: 2,343 Member
    I have sugar all the time, but I'm not diabetic so it's still healthy.
  • TavistockToad
    TavistockToad Posts: 35,719 Member
    Is there a medical reason you have to watch your sugar?
  • HazyEyes93
    HazyEyes93 Posts: 89 Member
    For me, it's mainly people at my job. Whenever I have a small lunch, everyone likes to be like "uh oh, she isn't eating again." Not eating a lot =/= not eating.
  • heiliskrimsli
    heiliskrimsli Posts: 735 Member
    For me, it's mainly people at my job. Whenever I have a small lunch, everyone likes to be like "uh oh, she isn't eating again." Not eating a lot =/= not eating.

    Point out that commenting on other people's dietary choices at work is potentially an HR issue. You don't know if someone's diet is religiously based or medical, so the professional thing to do is not comment.
  • TeaBea
    TeaBea Posts: 14,517 Member
    For me, it's mainly people at my job. Whenever I have a small lunch, everyone likes to be like "uh oh, she isn't eating again." Not eating a lot =/= not eating.

    Point out that commenting on other people's dietary choices at work is potentially an HR issue. You don't know if someone's diet is religiously based or medical, so the professional thing to do is not comment.

    I agree. This is potentially a very bad idea.
  • alondrakayy
    alondrakayy Posts: 304 Member
    I get this when I go to see my mother who loves to cook for me. I don't go often, so I just enjoy her food because she's the only mother I'll ever have and it's made with love (plus her cooking is the bomb). If my husband gets treats for me I also enjoy them. Like he got me a huge bag of those Easter egg chocolates and I've been eating out of them for a few weeks now. I make sure I can fit it into my day. But I understand that you can't really do this everyday.. so I feel ya!
  • pinuplove
    pinuplove Posts: 12,874 Member
    allsopgirl wrote: »
    I've noticed how pushed on me sugar is by my family and friends. The "just have a little bit" and "but it's your favorite" combined with "but I made/got it for you."
    Not only that but for me I have to buy my own food everywhere I go. Staying healthy is hard when people make dinner for you but you have to say no thanks and have a smoothie.
    It also dosent help that food labels don't show daily percentage of sugar in items or that a granola bar (supposedly good for me) has 18g of sugar in it.

    Anyone have advice for a girl on a budget that can't afford to be healthy at other people's homes?

    Why do you have to have a smoothie? Part of being successful to me is figuring out how to balance life and diet (diet = the food I eat, not 'diet' as in 'I'm on a diet to lose weight'). This includes proper portioning and making smarter choices. I know for myself, personally, it definitely doesn't include replacing dinner with a smoothie. If that's what works for you, go for it! I do believe it will make maintenance that much tougher, though.
  • JohnnyPenso
    JohnnyPenso Posts: 412 Member
    Sometimes OP you just have to be firm and stick to your own plan and do your own thing. I have the same kind of thing in my life I think many of us do. I used to do a lot of patient explaining but after a while you realize that some people just like to b**** and complain about what you're doing and you just ignore it and move on.
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    Also why do people say "at home" to mean "with your parents"? Of course I live at home. Everyone lives at home. The fact that you live there is what makes it home!

    I had the same thought, even though I say it with that meaning sometimes too. It's a habit, but weird expression.
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    allsopgirl wrote: »
    I've noticed how pushed on me sugar is by my family and friends. The "just have a little bit" and "but it's your favorite" combined with "but I made/got it for you."

    A lot of times this is because they are used to how you used to eat or aren't that observant. Just say no thanks, or if necessary say thanks and then don't eat it.
    Not only that but for me I have to buy my own food everywhere I go. Staying healthy is hard when people make dinner for you but you have to say no thanks and have a smoothie.

    In what context is this? Can't you just make your own food? Is there a reason the food won't work? When I visit my parents or stay with a friend I can usually make do easily with what is served, I just might eat more veg (when I visit my parents I usually buy the kinds of things I like for breakfast and extra vegetables and offer to make dinner some of the evenings I am there). I'll control portions for more caloric parts of the meal. Sometimes offering to shop with the person and to cook or making suggestions about what to have can work, depending on the relationship.
    It also dosent help that food labels don't show daily percentage of sugar in items or that a granola bar (supposedly good for me) has 18g of sugar in it.

    Daily percentage of sugar wouldn't be all that meaningful, as they don't know what your sugar goal is. I ignore all percentages. I also think it's well known that most granola bars are basically candy bars with a bit more fiber. (I will occasionally eat them if it's convenient for some reason or I'm in the mood for one, however.)