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The Official Millennial (Generation Y) Thread

1356

Replies

  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 39,832 Member
    edited June 2017
    angelxsss wrote: »
    BDonjon wrote: »
    DasItMan91 wrote: »
    You're just here for your trophy.

    And what trophy that might be?

    The "I showed up so give me an award" trophy.

    Hmm. To be fair--we're fair here, right?-- Gen Xers are the ones who screwed up millennials by giving them trophies.

    But that's one of those fun surprises in life: how each generation will screw up their children. Millennials are already hard at work screwing up the next generation, believe you me.

    Also the economy and the housing market and flooding the population with so many degrees that everyone needs one to do anything, virtually.

    The economy and housing market crash were largely attributable to Wall Street greed and market de-regulation, predatory lending, sub-prime lending, etc and were a long time coming...like way before Gen X were adults. This is actually more attributable to the baby boomers.

    I would agree there was a huge push for us to get college degrees...by our baby boomer parents who thought everyone needed a degree. I went to the military out of high school and my parents about *kitten* a brick and my dad even offered to pay for any university I wanted to attend that I could get into. When I got out of the military I wanted to go to trade school...I was thinking HVAC or Electrician...or just maybe be a forest ranger or something because I couldn't see myself sitting behind a desk...the amount of crap I got from my parents eventually had me switch courses and become an accountant which I'm naturally gifted at (whole family does it) and certainly pays the bills and provides for good financial stability...but it's not exactly my idea of a good time.

    I haven't given any millennials trophies...my kids are only 5 & 7. I will certainly encourage my kids to go to college if they choose to, but I'm also going to provide them plenty of information on trade school and options there as well...at least right now, that's where the demand is and will likely be for awhile.
  • angelxsss
    angelxsss Posts: 2,402 Member
    Well I have 2 bachelors, my parents and I took out loans to pay for them, and now I can't get into grad school (which is what's going to enable me to use my degrees to make money) because of insane competition, so I guess I'm dumb and made bad decisions trying to better myself at all and have ambitions instead of deciding based on job markets and money.
  • Caporegiem
    Caporegiem Posts: 4,298 Member
    angelxsss wrote: »
    Well I have 2 bachelors, my parents and I took out loans to pay for them, and now I can't get into grad school (which is what's going to enable me to use my degrees to make money) because of insane competition, so I guess I'm dumb and made bad decisions trying to better myself at all and have ambitions instead of deciding based on job markets and money.

    Through working I'm sure you've developed skills outside of your degrees that make you marketable. It's never to late to make a change in your career path. There are a lot of jobs out there that just want a candidate with a bachelors degree, doesn't necessarily matter what the major was.
  • LaPrincipessaFedele
    LaPrincipessaFedele Posts: 483 Member
    edited June 2017
    newmeadow wrote: »
    newmeadow wrote: »
    Caporegiem wrote: »
    ^This Nothing says a woman can't work in any of those fields.

    I don't know why more women don't. I work with a woman, who started in construction in her 20s, joined the Teamsters and started making $40 an hour within the first two years with nothing but on the job training. She worked as a general laborer. She didn't have to break her back and the men minded their own business and didn't mistreat her. And she's petite, blonde and feminine.

    Then, in her 40s, she put herself through LPN trade school and now does that. Let's just say, her work made her a homeowner and as comfortable as any white collar bachelor's degree holder without the debt and office politics.

    So what do you do for work?

    I work in a trade/vocational field. Paid for my own schooling (I trained in two different trades), got right to work earning right out of school and have no debt. I intentionally chose trades that had a huge need to fill positions. I knew I'd work right away and I did.

    I'd recommend trade for those who have to pay for their own educations.

    For those whose parents are willing to pay for university or college in full, I'd recommend they take full advantage of that offer and study something that will get them work right out of school.

    I wouldn't recommend any parent put themselves in debt or significant financial strain to put their kid through college when there are so many viable alternatives.

    Which is why you feel the way you do. People don't have to do what you think they should, thank heavens.

    I would be bored out of my mind in a trade/vocational field. Yes, I have massive student loan debt, but I work from sunup to sundown to fulfill my hopes and dreams. I couldn't care less if someone thinks my field is useless...as Oscar Wilde said, "all art is quite useless". However, it's also quite necessary. Who wants to live in a culture that only works trade or stem jobs?

    Anyway, the whole point of this thread is for a certain age group to bond over shared memories, so if you have nothing nice to say, maybe move right along. I don't think any of us is here for the same tired generation war that's been ongoing for centuries.
  • LaPrincipessaFedele
    LaPrincipessaFedele Posts: 483 Member
    newmeadow wrote: »
    newmeadow wrote: »
    newmeadow wrote: »
    Caporegiem wrote: »
    ^This Nothing says a woman can't work in any of those fields.

    I don't know why more women don't. I work with a woman, who started in construction in her 20s, joined the Teamsters and started making $40 an hour within the first two years with nothing but on the job training. She worked as a general laborer. She didn't have to break her back and the men minded their own business and didn't mistreat her. And she's petite, blonde and feminine.

    Then, in her 40s, she put herself through LPN trade school and now does that. Let's just say, her work made her a homeowner and as comfortable as any white collar bachelor's degree holder without the debt and office politics.

    So what do you do for work?

    I work in a trade/vocational field. Paid for my own schooling (I trained in two different trades), got right to work earning right out of school and have no debt. I intentionally chose trades that had a huge need to fill positions. I knew I'd work right away and I did.

    I'd recommend trade for those who have to pay for their own educations.

    For those whose parents are willing to pay for university or college in full, I'd recommend they take full advantage of that offer and study something that will get them work right out of school.

    I wouldn't recommend any parent put themselves in debt or significant financial strain to put their kid through college when there are so many viable alternatives.

    Which is why you feel the way you do. People don't have to do what you think they should, thank heavens.

    I would be bored out of my mind in a trade/vocational field. Yes, I have massive student loan debt, but I work from sunup to sundown to fulfill my hopes and dreams. I couldn't care less if someone thinks my field is useless...as Oscar Wilde said, "all art is quite useless". However, it's also quite necessary. Who wants to live in a culture that only works trade or stem jobs?

    Anyway, the whole point of this thread is for a certain age group to bond over shared memories, so if you have nothing nice to say, maybe move right along. I don't think any of us is here for the same tired generation war that's been ongoing for centuries.

    The warring words are yours darling and I sense you enjoyed posting them. You may not like what I've had to say in this thread but these conversations are for anyone to join so I offer no apologies. I gave many specific examples for anyone lurking, or joining, who might be looking for alternatives to millennial education debt, chronic underemployment and practical fields of work for millennials who have practical concerns and have to support themselves. This might not include you, so maybe you should move along and reminisce about Cabbage Patch Kids to your heart's content and keep the thread on track.

    Sweetie, go back and read the original post...I fear that unsolicited advice from you about how to live our lives was certainly not the point of this thread.
  • 1RedRoom
    1RedRoom Posts: 619 Member
    newmeadow wrote: »
    newmeadow wrote: »
    newmeadow wrote: »
    newmeadow wrote: »
    Caporegiem wrote: »
    ^This Nothing says a woman can't work in any of those fields.

    I don't know why more women don't. I work with a woman, who started in construction in her 20s, joined the Teamsters and started making $40 an hour within the first two years with nothing but on the job training. She worked as a general laborer. She didn't have to break her back and the men minded their own business and didn't mistreat her. And she's petite, blonde and feminine.

    Then, in her 40s, she put herself through LPN trade school and now does that. Let's just say, her work made her a homeowner and as comfortable as any white collar bachelor's degree holder without the debt and office politics.

    So what do you do for work?

    I work in a trade/vocational field. Paid for my own schooling (I trained in two different trades), got right to work earning right out of school and have no debt. I intentionally chose trades that had a huge need to fill positions. I knew I'd work right away and I did.

    I'd recommend trade for those who have to pay for their own educations.

    For those whose parents are willing to pay for university or college in full, I'd recommend they take full advantage of that offer and study something that will get them work right out of school.

    I wouldn't recommend any parent put themselves in debt or significant financial strain to put their kid through college when there are so many viable alternatives.

    Which is why you feel the way you do. People don't have to do what you think they should, thank heavens.

    I would be bored out of my mind in a trade/vocational field. Yes, I have massive student loan debt, but I work from sunup to sundown to fulfill my hopes and dreams. I couldn't care less if someone thinks my field is useless...as Oscar Wilde said, "all art is quite useless". However, it's also quite necessary. Who wants to live in a culture that only works trade or stem jobs?

    Anyway, the whole point of this thread is for a certain age group to bond over shared memories, so if you have nothing nice to say, maybe move right along. I don't think any of us is here for the same tired generation war that's been ongoing for centuries.

    The warring words are yours darling and I sense you enjoyed posting them. You may not like what I've had to say in this thread but these conversations are for anyone to join so I offer no apologies. I gave many specific examples for anyone lurking, or joining, who might be looking for alternatives to millennial education debt, chronic underemployment and practical fields of work for millennials who have practical concerns and have to support themselves. This might not include you, so maybe you should move along and reminisce about Cabbage Patch Kids to your heart's content and keep the thread on track.

    Sweetie, go back and read the original post...I fear that unsolicited advice from you about how to live our lives was certainly not the point of this thread.

    So what toys did you play with that you want to talk about? Did you envy the Olson twins? Was your lip gloss Grape Crush flavored?

    Lmao Stop giggles
  • DasItMan91
    DasItMan91 Posts: 5,753 Member
    edited June 2017
    Beast wars transformers was one of the greatest shows ever

    Yes it was. I remember always being amped to watching it back in the day.

    Anybody still have their original SNES/N64?

    I never got into that tbh but at the time it came out, I was 5 and not into video games til when the PS1 came out. Before the PS1, all I would play was the PC. In fact, that's all I've ever owned was the Playstations. I've played Xbox 360 and Xbox One and the Gameboy and Gamecube and the Wii at friends' houses but I will always be a Sony fan at heart.

  • LaPrincipessaFedele
    LaPrincipessaFedele Posts: 483 Member
    Remember these? :lol:

    dx26744gjvw9.jpg
  • beagletracks
    beagletracks Posts: 5,947 Member
    newmeadow wrote: »
    Peppermint P and bro circa 1989

    (forced to attend a wedding)

    zosat4dc92mt.jpg

    Girl, you had some balls.

    It was fun back then. No Hot Topic!

    Apparently "Millennial" refers to people born after 1980 (as someone possibly has already pointed out), so I don't belong here. Dang.

    http://www.pewresearch.org/topics/millennials/
  • LaPrincipessaFedele
    LaPrincipessaFedele Posts: 483 Member
    newmeadow wrote: »
    newmeadow wrote: »
    newmeadow wrote: »
    newmeadow wrote: »
    Caporegiem wrote: »
    ^This Nothing says a woman can't work in any of those fields.

    I don't know why more women don't. I work with a woman, who started in construction in her 20s, joined the Teamsters and started making $40 an hour within the first two years with nothing but on the job training. She worked as a general laborer. She didn't have to break her back and the men minded their own business and didn't mistreat her. And she's petite, blonde and feminine.

    Then, in her 40s, she put herself through LPN trade school and now does that. Let's just say, her work made her a homeowner and as comfortable as any white collar bachelor's degree holder without the debt and office politics.

    So what do you do for work?

    I work in a trade/vocational field. Paid for my own schooling (I trained in two different trades), got right to work earning right out of school and have no debt. I intentionally chose trades that had a huge need to fill positions. I knew I'd work right away and I did.

    I'd recommend trade for those who have to pay for their own educations.

    For those whose parents are willing to pay for university or college in full, I'd recommend they take full advantage of that offer and study something that will get them work right out of school.

    I wouldn't recommend any parent put themselves in debt or significant financial strain to put their kid through college when there are so many viable alternatives.

    Which is why you feel the way you do. People don't have to do what you think they should, thank heavens.

    I would be bored out of my mind in a trade/vocational field. Yes, I have massive student loan debt, but I work from sunup to sundown to fulfill my hopes and dreams. I couldn't care less if someone thinks my field is useless...as Oscar Wilde said, "all art is quite useless". However, it's also quite necessary. Who wants to live in a culture that only works trade or stem jobs?

    Anyway, the whole point of this thread is for a certain age group to bond over shared memories, so if you have nothing nice to say, maybe move right along. I don't think any of us is here for the same tired generation war that's been ongoing for centuries.

    The warring words are yours darling and I sense you enjoyed posting them. You may not like what I've had to say in this thread but these conversations are for anyone to join so I offer no apologies. I gave many specific examples for anyone lurking, or joining, who might be looking for alternatives to millennial education debt, chronic underemployment and practical fields of work for millennials who have practical concerns and have to support themselves. This might not include you, so maybe you should move along and reminisce about Cabbage Patch Kids to your heart's content and keep the thread on track.

    Sweetie, go back and read the original post...I fear that unsolicited advice from you about how to live our lives was certainly not the point of this thread.

    So what toys did you play with that you want to talk about? Did you envy the Olson twins? Was your lip gloss Grape Crush flavored?

    Oh you're too old and grumpy. I can't reminisce with you.
  • 1RedRoom
    1RedRoom Posts: 619 Member
    To day it's Hot topic back then it was the merry go round
  • beagletracks
    beagletracks Posts: 5,947 Member
    Peppermint P and bro circa 1989

    (forced to attend a wedding)

    zosat4dc92mt.jpg

    I can't awesome this picture enough. I need the love button

    <3
  • LaPrincipessaFedele
    LaPrincipessaFedele Posts: 483 Member
    Also these...and Lisa Frank everything!

    dn2ne3i8lt4k.jpg
  • 1RedRoom
    1RedRoom Posts: 619 Member
    newmeadow wrote: »
    newmeadow wrote: »
    newmeadow wrote: »
    newmeadow wrote: »
    newmeadow wrote: »
    Caporegiem wrote: »
    ^This Nothing says a woman can't work in any of those fields.

    I don't know why more women don't. I work with a woman, who started in construction in her 20s, joined the Teamsters and started making $40 an hour within the first two years with nothing but on the job training. She worked as a general laborer. She didn't have to break her back and the men minded their own business and didn't mistreat her. And she's petite, blonde and feminine.

    Then, in her 40s, she put herself through LPN trade school and now does that. Let's just say, her work made her a homeowner and as comfortable as any white collar bachelor's degree holder without the debt and office politics.

    So what do you do for work?

    I work in a trade/vocational field. Paid for my own schooling (I trained in two different trades), got right to work earning right out of school and have no debt. I intentionally chose trades that had a huge need to fill positions. I knew I'd work right away and I did.

    I'd recommend trade for those who have to pay for their own educations.

    For those whose parents are willing to pay for university or college in full, I'd recommend they take full advantage of that offer and study something that will get them work right out of school.

    I wouldn't recommend any parent put themselves in debt or significant financial strain to put their kid through college when there are so many viable alternatives.

    Which is why you feel the way you do. People don't have to do what you think they should, thank heavens.

    I would be bored out of my mind in a trade/vocational field. Yes, I have massive student loan debt, but I work from sunup to sundown to fulfill my hopes and dreams. I couldn't care less if someone thinks my field is useless...as Oscar Wilde said, "all art is quite useless". However, it's also quite necessary. Who wants to live in a culture that only works trade or stem jobs?

    Anyway, the whole point of this thread is for a certain age group to bond over shared memories, so if you have nothing nice to say, maybe move right along. I don't think any of us is here for the same tired generation war that's been ongoing for centuries.

    The warring words are yours darling and I sense you enjoyed posting them. You may not like what I've had to say in this thread but these conversations are for anyone to join so I offer no apologies. I gave many specific examples for anyone lurking, or joining, who might be looking for alternatives to millennial education debt, chronic underemployment and practical fields of work for millennials who have practical concerns and have to support themselves. This might not include you, so maybe you should move along and reminisce about Cabbage Patch Kids to your heart's content and keep the thread on track.

    Sweetie, go back and read the original post...I fear that unsolicited advice from you about how to live our lives was certainly not the point of this thread.

    So what toys did you play with that you want to talk about? Did you envy the Olson twins? Was your lip gloss Grape Crush flavored?

    Oh you're too old and grumpy. I can't reminisce with you.

    You're so mean. I envied Melissa Gilbert as Laura Ingalls on Little House on the Prairie even though I knew I was prettier than her. My lip gloss was rootbeer flavored and I bought it at Woolworths. I played with my Slip n' Slide after I took my Dr. Scholl's off. Then, after some Hydrox and Tang, me and my sister would watch reruns of Sarah T., Portrait of a Teenage Alcoholic starring Linda Blair on channel 38.

    I would just like to say I really really enjoyed reading that Lol thank u
  • LaPrincipessaFedele
    LaPrincipessaFedele Posts: 483 Member
    newmeadow wrote: »
    1RedRoom wrote: »
    newmeadow wrote: »
    newmeadow wrote: »
    newmeadow wrote: »
    newmeadow wrote: »
    newmeadow wrote: »
    Caporegiem wrote: »
    ^This Nothing says a woman can't work in any of those fields.

    I don't know why more women don't. I work with a woman, who started in construction in her 20s, joined the Teamsters and started making $40 an hour within the first two years with nothing but on the job training. She worked as a general laborer. She didn't have to break her back and the men minded their own business and didn't mistreat her. And she's petite, blonde and feminine.

    Then, in her 40s, she put herself through LPN trade school and now does that. Let's just say, her work made her a homeowner and as comfortable as any white collar bachelor's degree holder without the debt and office politics.

    So what do you do for work?

    I work in a trade/vocational field. Paid for my own schooling (I trained in two different trades), got right to work earning right out of school and have no debt. I intentionally chose trades that had a huge need to fill positions. I knew I'd work right away and I did.

    I'd recommend trade for those who have to pay for their own educations.

    For those whose parents are willing to pay for university or college in full, I'd recommend they take full advantage of that offer and study something that will get them work right out of school.

    I wouldn't recommend any parent put themselves in debt or significant financial strain to put their kid through college when there are so many viable alternatives.

    Which is why you feel the way you do. People don't have to do what you think they should, thank heavens.

    I would be bored out of my mind in a trade/vocational field. Yes, I have massive student loan debt, but I work from sunup to sundown to fulfill my hopes and dreams. I couldn't care less if someone thinks my field is useless...as Oscar Wilde said, "all art is quite useless". However, it's also quite necessary. Who wants to live in a culture that only works trade or stem jobs?

    Anyway, the whole point of this thread is for a certain age group to bond over shared memories, so if you have nothing nice to say, maybe move right along. I don't think any of us is here for the same tired generation war that's been ongoing for centuries.

    The warring words are yours darling and I sense you enjoyed posting them. You may not like what I've had to say in this thread but these conversations are for anyone to join so I offer no apologies. I gave many specific examples for anyone lurking, or joining, who might be looking for alternatives to millennial education debt, chronic underemployment and practical fields of work for millennials who have practical concerns and have to support themselves. This might not include you, so maybe you should move along and reminisce about Cabbage Patch Kids to your heart's content and keep the thread on track.

    Sweetie, go back and read the original post...I fear that unsolicited advice from you about how to live our lives was certainly not the point of this thread.

    So what toys did you play with that you want to talk about? Did you envy the Olson twins? Was your lip gloss Grape Crush flavored?

    Oh you're too old and grumpy. I can't reminisce with you.

    You're so mean. I envied Melissa Gilbert as Laura Ingalls on Little House on the Prairie even though I knew I was prettier than her. My lip gloss was rootbeer flavored and I bought it at Woolworths. I played with my Slip n' Slide after I took my Dr. Scholl's off. Then, after some Hydrox and Tang, me and my sister would watch reruns of Sarah T., Portrait of a Teenage Alcoholic starring Linda Blair on channel 38.

    I would just like to say I really really enjoyed reading that Lol thank u

    Thank you love. And good to see you back because you're a sweetie. Now I'm getting out of this Millennial thread before they take up the torches and pitchforks and run me out of town, Young Frankenstein style.

    I really hope that you find happiness someday. Best of luck!
  • beagletracks
    beagletracks Posts: 5,947 Member
    angelxsss wrote: »
    Well I have 2 bachelors, my parents and I took out loans to pay for them, and now I can't get into grad school (which is what's going to enable me to use my degrees to make money) because of insane competition, so I guess I'm dumb and made bad decisions trying to better myself at all and have ambitions instead of deciding based on job markets and money.

    I admire you for following your heart rather than the $$$

    That's what I did, too, and I don't regret it for one second.
  • angelxsss
    angelxsss Posts: 2,402 Member
    edited June 2017
    angelxsss wrote: »
    Well I have 2 bachelors, my parents and I took out loans to pay for them, and now I can't get into grad school (which is what's going to enable me to use my degrees to make money) because of insane competition, so I guess I'm dumb and made bad decisions trying to better myself at all and have ambitions instead of deciding based on job markets and money.

    I admire you for following your heart rather than the $$$

    That's what I did, too, and I don't regret it for one second.

    Thank you :) I'm ending up regretting it a lot though haha
  • LaPrincipessaFedele
    LaPrincipessaFedele Posts: 483 Member
    edited June 2017
    angelxsss wrote: »
    angelxsss wrote: »
    Well I have 2 bachelors, my parents and I took out loans to pay for them, and now I can't get into grad school (which is what's going to enable me to use my degrees to make money) because of insane competition, so I guess I'm dumb and made bad decisions trying to better myself at all and have ambitions instead of deciding based on job markets and money.

    I admire you for following your heart rather than the $$$

    That's what I did, too, and I don't regret it for one second.

    Thank you :) I'm ending up regretting it a lot though haha

    Don't regret it. People will always tell you that you should have done things differently, but they're mostly jealous that they chose the "safe" route and their life turned into the Big Snooze. I'm a professional opera singer, and yeah I have to work full time in an office in order to go home and spend the vast majority of my "free time" chasing gigs and learning music. (And I perform pretty much constantly.) However, I wouldn't change it for the world. Everyone has their own path to follow.

    P.S. I'm really a nice person, but sometimes I get annoyed by people who think they know what everyone else should do just because it worked for them.
  • thewindandthework
    thewindandthework Posts: 539 Member
    Born in '83, and I definitely identify with younger Millennials better than with Gen Xers. Tumblr keeps me young.