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“Physically Fit Women Nearly 90% Less Likely To Develop Dementia”

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  • monkeefan1974monkeefan1974 Posts: 594Member Member Posts: 594Member Member
    ladyreva78 wrote: »
    Is there a genetic component to dementia? Or is that a pure 'lifestyle' disease caused by our increased access to food and deceasing physical activity?

    The truth is we don’t know exactly what causes dementia but there are genetic dispositions to it in some families. More research is needed!
  • monkeefan1974monkeefan1974 Posts: 594Member Member Posts: 594Member Member
    Fuzzipeg wrote: »
    A Canadian dementia site gives a good list of causes, from alcoholism and drug abuse to vit b 12 deficiency, (which can be caused by the lack of a digestive enzyme to protect it to the place where it is absorbed, there is a very long list of health issues associated with low vit b12) The site also give poor thyroid function as a cause too. Family history can be indicative, having high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabeties and even smoking can all be associated factors. Dementia can happen as the result of a brain injury. In situations where b12 deficiency or thyroid function are adequately diagnosed and addressed the situation can improve so its not a life sentence in all situations.

    Alzheimer's is different to vascular dementia which comes from strokes and other vascular issues. Thinking is moving to the causes of Alzheimer's having many causes from toxic environments, think engine fumes, chemicals from industry or leaching from carpets and other household items. (I'm concerned about some strong perfumes and laundry residues which can leave me and others nauseous) Viruses are in the possible causes, irregular protein production, compromised blood flow to the brain can be in the mix. Ageing into very advanced years with a family history is there are a key component.

    I follow many UK, information content programs, Trust me I'm a Doctor, Doctor in the house, there are more, radio programmes, Inside Science and Inside Heath, 2 separate programmes, even "the food programme" has had several programmes devoted to the role of digestive microbes in health. Then there is "all in the mind", this beings out some really good snippets, not least, low thyroid t3 can contribute to mental health issues!

    Our turn to medications, antibiotics not only kill off the microbes causing the problem we take them for they also kill of some of the more beneficial ones allowing less helpful ones to become out of balance. Female contraceptives also can have a detrimental effect on the body some are more susceptible than others. Even vegetarians can be at risk of having increased copper levels which can cause many symptoms. I worry because many with thyroid problems are fobbed off with normal range numbers, this can cover a multitude of sins because a person might be within general normal range but for them specifically it is causing a real problem.

    It is true, in any one person we can't say the cause is this or that but we know contributory factors so its up to us to keep ourselves as well as we can, even when our health advisers feel to be working against us. Not testing for thyroid problems properly. STTM a thyroid support site says the numbers we are all held up to are floored, in that the sample remains from other tests used for thyroid testing was not accompanied by information from the patient, were they or other members of their families being treated for thyroid issues? That is a really big one because it will distort the figures achieved. Even age and gender would have helped. Thyroid conditions are more common in women. Dietary insufficiencies can be responsible for the decrease in conversion rate of t4 to t3. the body needs a certain amount of iodine a day amounting to 1/4 of a teaspoon over year but without selenium, zinc, and other vitamins and minerals conversion will be compromised, yet ensuring good nutrition is not at the top of anyone's list of to check on, at least here in the UK.

    What is known is the tip of the iceberg when it comes to health or chronic health conditions. Its up to us to stay with the cutting edge of understanding for so many reasons, mine is self preservation. Good Health, to everyone.

    Very interesting points! I’ll have to look into some of the things you mentioned. There are bound to be many factors causing the many types of dementia that exist. This study is very inspiring though and more research is definitely needed.
  • monkeefan1974monkeefan1974 Posts: 594Member Member Posts: 594Member Member
    Mari22na wrote: »
    Exercise is good. Genetics rule. I know a fit family, the fittest people I know. Work from daylight to dark all of the days of their life. The grandmother, mother and now all of the children have it. They're relatively young in their 50s's and leaving this world one by one within months of each other.

    Sounds like there’s a genetic component for sure. Hopefully the much needed research will continue and one day we will have effective treatments or even a cure for this terrible disease.
  • monkeefan1974monkeefan1974 Posts: 594Member Member Posts: 594Member Member
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    I've seen it called T3D too. Some seem to show dementia is at least partially from IR in the brain. Since exercise helps manage BG, and appears to help prevent some IR, it makes sense that exercise could help prevent some Alzheimer's.

    From what I've seen, it is a preventative thing. Exercise helps reverse IR in muscles but does help as much with the brain. Dietary changes look more promising at that point, IMO.

    Definitely good points to consider. This was an interesting study that offers some hope to possibly curb this terrible disease and more physical activity will improve quality of life regardless.
  • monkeefan1974monkeefan1974 Posts: 594Member Member Posts: 594Member Member
    My mother has dementia, she is 78, possibly had it for at least 8 to 10 years. My mother never did learn to drive and pretty much walked everywhere, she wasn't into active activities but did play lawn bowls. In her sixties she had the bones of a much younger person due to her walking...she use to maintain a cracking pace.

    I have heard that some people call dementia the third diabetes.

    Being fit and healthy may not be a deterrant to all health issues and illnesses but at least being fit and healthy gives most a fighting chance.
    Definitely incentive! Barring an accident, I'm pretty sure I'm going to live a very long time. My maternal grandmother passed at 94. My paternal grandmother is still alive and kicking at 96. My fear however is that I'll live a long time, but suffer from dementia like my maternal Grandmother.

    Indeed with the way this terrible disease presents and progresses, just about any chance to stave it off would be worth taking. And physical exercise will enrich our lives more anyway so it’s definitely worth a try!
  • nvmomketonvmomketo Posts: 11,401Member Member Posts: 11,401Member Member
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    I've seen it called T3D too. Some seem to show dementia is at least partially from IR in the brain. Since exercise helps manage BG, and appears to help prevent some IR, it makes sense that exercise could help prevent some Alzheimer's.

    From what I've seen, it is a preventative thing. Exercise helps reverse IR in muscles but does help as much with the brain. Dietary changes look more promising at that point, IMO.

    Definitely good points to consider. This was an interesting study that offers some hope to possibly curb this terrible disease and more physical activity will improve quality of life regardless.

    I agree that physical activity does help. A lot. The problem is for those who can't do much physical activity. Some people can't do enough to get much of a benefit. :(
  • deannalfisherdeannalfisher Posts: 4,485Member, Premium Member Posts: 4,485Member, Premium Member
    I’ve mentioned this book a few times in other threads but Why We Sleep has a chapter talking about Alzheimer’s and other formers of dementia and how Sleep research is looking at causality between the two - there seems to be some longitudinal studies from Europe that draw some interesting conclusions
  • singingfluteladysingingflutelady Posts: 8,334Member Member Posts: 8,334Member Member
    Mari22na wrote: »
    Exercise is good. Genetics rule. I know a fit family, the fittest people I know. Work from daylight to dark all of the days of their life. The grandmother, mother and now all of the children have it. They're relatively young in their 50s's and leaving this world one by one within months of each other.

    Sounds like there’s a genetic component for sure. Hopefully the much needed research will continue and one day we will have effective treatments or even a cure for this terrible disease.

    There have been a few genes that if you have them you get Alzheimer's. Mostly linked to early onset. There have been a few families with these genes that have been helping with research. I don't remember their names but there is a documentary on it.
  • hesn92hesn92 Posts: 5,186Member Member Posts: 5,186Member Member
    My grandma is an identical twin. My grandma is in really poor health and I suspect she has dementia or she’s starting to. It’s very sad. However her twin seems to be very healthy. Her mind is all there, she gets around much better. She was also a lot more active and always exercised. Even now she likes to play tennis among other things. . My grandma never exercised. (According to my mom) I know I just picked one thing out of the many different lifestyle choices they both made throughout their lives so I’m sure that’s not the only contributing factor. But still.
    edited July 2018
  • hesn92hesn92 Posts: 5,186Member Member Posts: 5,186Member Member
    And yes dementia and Alzheimer’s are awful and I’m terrified of growing old.
  • monkeefan1974monkeefan1974 Posts: 594Member Member Posts: 594Member Member
    I’ve mentioned this book a few times in other threads but Why We Sleep has a chapter talking about Alzheimer’s and other formers of dementia and how Sleep research is looking at causality between the two - there seems to be some longitudinal studies from Europe that draw some interesting conclusions

    Interesting! I’ll have to look into that. Thanks!
  • monkeefan1974monkeefan1974 Posts: 594Member Member Posts: 594Member Member

    Wow, those people are unfortunate getting the disease so early in life! It’s going to be interesting seeing what they can learn from studying all those cases. Could it be an environmental contamination? Genetic? A virus? Fascinating, thanks for sharing!
  • monkeefan1974monkeefan1974 Posts: 594Member Member Posts: 594Member Member
    hesn92 wrote: »
    My grandma is an identical twin. My grandma is in really poor health and I suspect she has dementia or she’s starting to. It’s very sad. However her twin seems to be very healthy. Her mind is all there, she gets around much better. She was also a lot more active and always exercised. Even now she likes to play tennis among other things. . My grandma never exercised. (According to my mom) I know I just picked one thing out of the many different lifestyle choices they both made throughout their lives so I’m sure that’s not the only contributing factor. But still.

    That is an amazing anecdote! Differences between identical twins is definitely worth studying. There could indeed be something to it since the difference in their physical activity is so markedly noticeable. Something to take into consideration and use as an incentive for all of us middle agers to get more exercise. Thank you for sharing your experience!
  • CSARdiverCSARdiver Posts: 5,374Member Member Posts: 5,374Member Member
    hesn92 wrote: »
    My grandma is an identical twin. My grandma is in really poor health and I suspect she has dementia or she’s starting to. It’s very sad. However her twin seems to be very healthy. Her mind is all there, she gets around much better. She was also a lot more active and always exercised. Even now she likes to play tennis among other things. . My grandma never exercised. (According to my mom) I know I just picked one thing out of the many different lifestyle choices they both made throughout their lives so I’m sure that’s not the only contributing factor. But still.

    Genetics establishes the parameters of our capabilities, but behavior and environment can push beyond those parameters. For this push to occur we need a sense of purpose and responsibility.

    Biological systems are amazing as our bodies adapt to necessity - very little is wasted. If you engage your muscles, say jogging one day, the body responds by sending more blood for the activity. If the activity persists, the body responds by building new vasculature to make the process more efficient.

    Same response occurs if systems are not used - capillary beds collapse if you go from an active life to a sedentary one.
  • monkeefan1974monkeefan1974 Posts: 594Member Member Posts: 594Member Member
  • monkeefan1974monkeefan1974 Posts: 594Member Member Posts: 594Member Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    VUA21 wrote: »
    Countless peer reviewed, legitimate studies k\eep coming up with the same results: physically fit people have a statistically significant lower chance of developing mental and physical problems throughout thier life. That includes everything from dementia to cancer.

    I "insightful"-ed that, but it's really more of a "well, duh!" (no insult intended).

    I'm 62. All I have to do is look around me at people my age +/- 10 or so years, look at their quality of life on average, look at the obvious condition of the majority of people in doctors' offices I visit, think about the people I knew who are already dead, and it's stupid obvious. Physically fit people have better odds of better outcomes.

    Guaranteed? No. But better odds, no question - across the board, physical and cognitive benefits. I can't even begin to understand why someone "woo"-ed your post.

    Agreed! My life is so much better now being physically active that even if it conferred no additional future benefits, it would still be worth it to remain active to enjoy the higher quality of life more activity provides today. And this is after a lifetime of sedentary living, I know better now and I’ll never go back to that.
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