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How do you measure butter?

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  • Rocknut53Rocknut53 Member Posts: 1,798 Member Member Posts: 1,798 Member
    earlnabby wrote: »
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    FireOpalCO wrote: »
    nutmegoreo wrote: »

    FireOpalCO wrote: »

    Well I do when I make a grilled peanut butter & jelly, just not on the same side of the bread. :)

    I have never tried this! :open_mouth:

    Next you'll be telling me you've never had a peanut butter, honey, and cinnamon sandwich.

    More seriously, I grew up having grilled PB&J as a "feel better" food when sick and knew them as Teddy Bear Sandwiches. Not sure how they got that name.

    Edited to add: use quality peanut butter, preserves, and real butter. Cheap jellies and margarine aren't going to give you a good sandwich.

    I feel so behind everyone else.

    I didn't even try peanut butter and banana sandwiches until I was 38.

    I am 62 and I still haven't tried one. Might be because bananas make me barf.

    I love peanut butter, I like bananas, but they don't belong together on a sandwich. Just my opinion, which isn't worth much.
  • SunLovinMiaSunLovinMia Member Posts: 16 Member Member Posts: 16 Member
    Today, I used a measuring spoon of what I thought I used and spread it on with a knife. It gave me an idea of how much I use so I know for future reference
  • cerise_noircerise_noir Member Posts: 5,479 Member Member Posts: 5,479 Member
    Today, I used a measuring spoon of what I thought I used and spread it on with a knife. It gave me an idea of how much I use so I know for future reference

    I can fit 25g of peanut butter in a tablespoon... 15g is a serving. Weigh it... it’ll make you cry :lol:



  • JeromeBarry1JeromeBarry1 Member Posts: 10,177 Member Member Posts: 10,177 Member
    If I were to want to spread butter on my toast, I'd weigh the bread before toasting, then toast the bread and reset the scale to 0. When the bread is finished toasting, I'd put it on the scale, note the value which is going to be less than the pre-toast weight, then spread the butter and weigh it again. That way I can see the delta between toast weight and buttered toast weight. I understand this may not be suitable for all users. Most of us are accustomed to a restaurant pat of butter and can recognize the thickness of it. That's 5 grams of a standard 1/4 lb stick of butter.
  • FuzzipegFuzzipeg Member Posts: 2,002 Member Member Posts: 2,002 Member
    I've seen the suggested serving for peanut butter is 15 grams, one can achieve a higher amount on the spoon if one so wishes. As long as one logs the appropriate number of calories for the actual weight there is no reason, as long as one is within their calorie allocation and does not have some endocrine issue, not to loose weight.

    Many of us do not eat out and do not recognise the size of catering portion butter pats. Also over here in the UK our butter is sold in what I call half lb packs, only thanks to our having to go metric, too many years ago, they are now 9 ounces. 5 grams, if one weighs in grams is 5 grams from what ever size of butter pack one is using.
  • cerise_noircerise_noir Member Posts: 5,479 Member Member Posts: 5,479 Member
    crazyravr wrote: »
    Today, I used a measuring spoon of what I thought I used and spread it on with a knife. It gave me an idea of how much I use so I know for future reference

    I can fit 25g of peanut butter in a tablespoon... 15g is a serving. Weigh it... it’ll make you cry :lol:



    No such thing as 15g is serving idea.
    Serving = the amount you eat. In your cake the serving was 25g :)

    The best is ppl that dont use a scale and scoop up a heaping tablespoon of peanut butter and then count this as per the label on the jar.... what follows are thread of "why cant I lose weight" :)

    My point was, that it’s easy to stuff more than 15g in a tablespoon and log it as a tablespoon, and go about your merry day until you can’t figure out why you’re not losing as much weight as you thought. :lol: Of course I don’t stop at 15g.. I’ve been known to have 45g, sometimes more, but I make sure Iog it as accurately as possible considering how calorie-dense it is (unfortunately). I love PB!
  • COGypsyCOGypsy Member Posts: 621 Member Member Posts: 621 Member
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    FireOpalCO wrote: »
    flippy1234 wrote: »
    I put a small amount of Kerrygold butter (the best by the way) on my 1 piece of toast in the morning. How should I measure it?

    When you can no longer see bread, that's 1 serving.

    I think that's for peanut butter... :bigsmile:

    Right??? Because the butter melts. You'd keep adding and adding until your bread was soggy, and you'd still see it.

    Do you use butter with your peanut butter?

    My grandmother made all of her sandwiches with “cow butter” directly on the bread and then the other toppings after that. PB&J would be bread, cow butter, peanut butter, jelly, cow butter, bread. A regular sandwich would be bread, cow butter, mayo, meat, cheese, cow butter, bread.

    Kept them from getting soggy in your lunchbox!
  • emmamcgarityemmamcgarity Member Posts: 1,483 Member Member Posts: 1,483 Member
    Most accurate is a scale as many have pointed out. Measuring spoons and measuring cups are not as accurate but still better than eyeballing. Use the method you prefer, but if you are not losing weight, the first place to check is tightening the accuracy of your logging.

    Disclaimer: I don’t use a scale. But if I stop losing weight that may change.
  • RalphoneRalphone Member Posts: 1,770 Member Member Posts: 1,770 Member
    Weight is most accurate.With a food scale
  • cmriversidecmriverside Member Posts: 30,527 Member Member Posts: 30,527 Member
    If I were to want to spread butter on my toast, I'd weigh the bread before toasting, then toast the bread and reset the scale to 0. When the bread is finished toasting, I'd put it on the scale, note the value which is going to be less than the pre-toast weight, then spread the butter and weigh it again. That way I can see the delta between toast weight and buttered toast weight. I understand this may not be suitable for all users. Most of us are accustomed to a restaurant pat of butter and can recognize the thickness of it. That's 5 grams of a standard 1/4 lb stick of butter.

    Wait.

    HOLD UP.

    A serving of butter/14g is one tablespoon for 100 calories.

    If you're using 5g as a serving, you're doing it wrong/depriving yourself of 9g of delishishness.




    Now. For those people who use a tablespoon to measure your butter...you know you can't fill it to the rim, right? That's more like 17-18g.
  • emmamcgarityemmamcgarity Member Posts: 1,483 Member Member Posts: 1,483 Member
    I forgot to mention that if you only had a half teaspoon of butter on your bread that it was a very sad snack....
  • RalphoneRalphone Member Posts: 1,770 Member Member Posts: 1,770 Member
    I did not say you could eat as much as you want lol just how to measure it.
    edited October 2018
  • geneticsteachergeneticsteacher Member Posts: 623 Member Member Posts: 623 Member
    Easiest for me - put toast on plate, put plate on scale. Turn on scale. Should read "0". Add butter, record weight. If you are adding multiple ingredients, you will need to use tare button, but for just one ingredient - no.
  • perkymommyperkymommy Member Posts: 1,639 Member Member Posts: 1,639 Member
    Are you using real butter or margarine? Butter has the tbsp with lines you cut on the butter stick. If you cut half of that or less then I'd log it as 1/2 tbsp.
  • nutmegoreonutmegoreo Member Posts: 15,514 Member Member Posts: 15,514 Member
    COGypsy wrote: »
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    FireOpalCO wrote: »
    flippy1234 wrote: »
    I put a small amount of Kerrygold butter (the best by the way) on my 1 piece of toast in the morning. How should I measure it?

    When you can no longer see bread, that's 1 serving.

    I think that's for peanut butter... :bigsmile:

    Right??? Because the butter melts. You'd keep adding and adding until your bread was soggy, and you'd still see it.

    Do you use butter with your peanut butter?

    My grandmother made all of her sandwiches with “cow butter” directly on the bread and then the other toppings after that. PB&J would be bread, cow butter, peanut butter, jelly, cow butter, bread. A regular sandwich would be bread, cow butter, mayo, meat, cheese, cow butter, bread.

    Kept them from getting soggy in your lunchbox!

    Butter is definitely a great moisture barrier for premade sandwiches, but I typically will take the ingredients separately and make it on the spot now, but as kids, the butter was an important component for the lunch sandwich to still be edible at lunch time.
  • JeromeBarry1JeromeBarry1 Member Posts: 10,177 Member Member Posts: 10,177 Member
    perkymommy wrote: »
    Are you using real butter or margarine? Butter has the tbsp with lines you cut on the butter stick. If you cut half of that or less then I'd log it as 1/2 tbsp.

    I was just waiting to see how long this could go before somebody said something useful.
  • manderson27manderson27 Member Posts: 3,474 Member Member Posts: 3,474 Member
    [/quote] I'm 62 and haven't tried one, either. In my case it's probably because <trigger warning> I mostly don't think bread is worth the calories. Meh. ;)[/quote]

    You take that back, you take that back right now! How would I make a bacon sandwich?
  • manderson27manderson27 Member Posts: 3,474 Member Member Posts: 3,474 Member
    PB and Marmite sandwich >:)
    edited October 2018
  • flippy1234flippy1234 Member Posts: 686 Member Member Posts: 686 Member
    perkymommy wrote: »
    Are you using real butter or margarine? Butter has the tbsp with lines you cut on the butter stick. If you cut half of that or less then I'd log it as 1/2 tbsp.

    Kerrigold, the good stuff. I did mention this before by the way.
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