What Was Your Work Out Today?

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  • dralicephd
    dralicephd Posts: 154 Member
    1 hour of slow Hatha Yoga today as an easy Sunday "recovery workout" (at least that's what my Polar called it. haha...). Most of it was Zone 1 and below, with a brief dip into Zone 2 during the sun salutations and some squat-like movements. I'm enjoying my person physiology data. :smiley:
  • swimmom_1
    swimmom_1 Posts: 449 Member
    224 minutes on the Elliptical, was an unintentionally slower pace as I only got to 14.25 miles instead of my usual 15-16 miles.
  • JDMac82
    JDMac82 Posts: 2,822 Member
    60 mins hiking with 40# pack
  • JDMac82
    JDMac82 Posts: 2,822 Member
    Monday morning Boot Camp

    50 Fwd Jump Rope & 50 Fast Jump Rope
    50 Skier
    50 1/2 Jaxs
    600 Meter Run @ 5 inc for all runs
    35 KBell Swing
    600 Meter Run
    35 Goblet Squats
    600 Meter Run
    45 Jack Knifes
    600 Meter Run
    75 Crunches
    600 Meter Run
    35 Frog Burps
    600 Meter Run
    40 Hand Release Push-ups
    600 Meter Run
    25 Box Jumps (24/36/48 Box)
    600 Meter Run
    25 Dbell Snatch
    2 laps Walk
    Stretching

    2.4 Miles Ran
    515 Total Reps
  • J72FIT
    J72FIT Posts: 5,926 Member
    7-8 am:
    Warm-Up
    Elliptical - 1mile (8m)

    Mobility - (15m)

    Strength: Chest/Back
    Pull-up: 12-10-7r (29r)
    Pushup: 24-19-14r (57r)
    Row: 12-10-7r (29r)
  • Lietchi
    Lietchi Posts: 3,291 Member
    Lietchi wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »

    Since this was intentionally a non-intense effort (that breakfast!), I decided to focus on technique. Reviewing basics is always good, and I tend to rotate through tech focuses over the Winter - things that apply to both boats and machines. For some reason (heh), it seemed interesting to focus on aspects of good technique that I've learned protect the back and shoulders. Usually, good technique (technique that makes us faster) is consonant with safe technique (things that avoid injury), fortunately.

    I'm about to geek out on good technique features that also protect back/shoulders, feeling like I have a little tiny permission, but I'll hide it in a spoiler to make it easy to ignore for people who don't care.
    IMO, there are two main areas of concern in shoulders/upper back, when it comes to rowing technique:

    1. Rotator cuff, and the associated connective tissues. Partly that risk comes from imbalance, since rowing is only upper body pull. (Smart people do some upper body push exercises to balance stresses.) Part of the risk comes from suboptimal technique.

    2. Spine, generally. Back troubles are easy to create.

    For me, protecting shoulders and back means focusing on: (A) Prep out of the finish, and (B) creating structure to transfer power during the drive, distinguishing which muscles create structure vs. generate power, in different parts of the stroke.

    All of the arm extension and forward body angle happen right after the finish. My arms have accelerated the last fraction of the drive, almost a snap. They immediately move away from my body at that same speed: Quick in, smooth turn, quick out. (If someone has a tendency to pause at the so-called finish, a quicker arms-away on the rowing machine will tend to drop split a second or two, almost for free. It lets the flywheel keep spinning fast.)

    Length is important for better splits, so it's tempting to extend the arms away from the armpits/shoulders to get more upper body length: Not a good idea. That stresses the small muscles/tendons, which can't contribute much to power. Instead, I want my shoulders packed – stabilized – pulled down and arms connected to the torso. One of my coaches talked about imagining squeezing a tennis ball between the shoulder blades, really full lat engagement.

    Forward body swing happens next, smoothly, after the arms-away - as if the arms (still packed at shoulder!) pull the torso forward. The body swing isn't bending the spine, it's coming from the big hip joints. (What I tell new rowers, and remind myself, is to think of those bird toys that sit on the edge of a water glass, dip their beak in the water, swing back up on an axle, then down again. The hips are where that axle is.) My torso should be a firm unit, core engaged 360 degrees to maintain the straight back: It’s the angle of back to legs that changes.

    What I want is upper body engagement: My shoulders not forward of the torso, but linked to it firmly with the lats. Upper shoulders down.

    Me, I loooove to over-use the upper body. IME, that seems somewhat more common in male new rowers than female ones as a fault, but I need to have all the faults, it seems like. Part of that is a temptation is to use the upper traps, because they're kind of big. Raising the shoulders makes it feel like the upper body is working more. It's not helpful, because it’s not useful (powerful) work.

    After the forward (recovery) arms-away and body swing, the slide’s tilt, plus relaxation, carry me up to the catch, shins vertical. Then all that body set-up, described above, starts to do work, during the drive phase.

    During the legs & swing part of the drive, my upper body’s job is to create/maintain structure. The structure’s job is to transfer power from the big leg muscles. I want to suspend my body weight between the handle and the foot-stretchers. In the first phase of the drive, I need to augment that raw weight with a strong push (almost like a jump, but smooth) from the legs. The arms are just cables, the shoulders and back structure help transfer power through the body. Upper body is not doing power generation, at this phase.

    My first coach would say “don’t be a taco!” Bending the back into a c-shape (taco) is hard on the back. The spine is weak, moved by small muscles, not powerful. The core (all the way around) is more important, and the glutes/hamstrings do a lot of the power work in the body swing part of the drive.

    Ideally, the glutes are not pinned, as one might assume, by pressure against the seat. I mentioned suspending weight between handles and foot-stretcher: I want that suspension to continue all the way from the catch to the finish. There won’t be airspace between butt and seat (or the seat will escape), but there can/should be a slight unweighting or decompression of butt on seat all the way through the drive. The drive is over when that can’t be sustained.

    So. TL;DR: The major points are that I want shoulders down, lats firm. Until the arms part at the end of the drive, my arms just transfer power. An engaged upper body makes that power transfer work, and protects the shoulders. I strive to suspend my body weight to allow glutes/hamstrings to do the body swing. The body swing is primarily a pivot-like movement in the hip joints. During the whole rowing stroke, the torso is a single core-engaged straight unit, protecting the spine.

    Interesting, thanks!
    I'm going to pay more attention next time I row. It's not a rotator cuff issue, I think. More spine/posture related, perhaps I'm holding my back too straight (if that's even possible) or perhaps my back muscle are simply a bit weak. But I'll hopefully have a better idea next time I row, based on your explanations.

    So today I did a rowing session: 6714m in 35 minutes - 65% in Z3 and the rest in Z2 or lower.

    I paid attention to my technique. That suspending weight thing (slight lift-off of butt) is tricky, not sure if I got that right but my butt cheeks were definitely feeling the burn 😁
    As for the upper body, still discomfort in the back after a while (just below bra strap height), the only thing that seems to help is bending forward/relaxing the back just a bit (for the whole movement, not any particular phase) so perhaps I was overextending when I thought I was keeping my back straight.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 22,823 Member
    edited December 2021
    Rowing machine, same ol' 3 x (2k on, 2' off) + 1k on + 3' CD, for a total of 8,218 meters.

    Yesterday was rest day, but I did some sun salutations after I got up, and a few light kettlebell deadlifts later, more as a stretch-out than a strength challenge. This morning, sun salutations before breakfast, too.

    Once again, schedule logistics meant eating full breakfast right before the row, so I kept it easy (the 2:37 pace thing at mostly 18-20spm: ended up averaging 2:36.2), getting 74% Z3 and the rest below, HR peak at 140 (high 60s percent reserve).

    It was a good time to work on technical stuff again. Through most of the pieces, I focused separately on things that I know are frequent bugaboos for me, and usually worth a second or so of pace if I nail them. It's mostly things that also lengthen the drive: Heels down first at start of drive, hold the forward upper body angle as long as feasible, think about using the glutes to open the body angle, quick arm in/out, full extension of foward body angle before legs recover.

    On the final 1K, I tried to put it all together. Yup, that's too many things for me to think about all at once.😆
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 22,823 Member
    Lietchi wrote: »
    Lietchi wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »

    Since this was intentionally a non-intense effort (that breakfast!), I decided to focus on technique. Reviewing basics is always good, and I tend to rotate through tech focuses over the Winter - things that apply to both boats and machines. For some reason (heh), it seemed interesting to focus on aspects of good technique that I've learned protect the back and shoulders. Usually, good technique (technique that makes us faster) is consonant with safe technique (things that avoid injury), fortunately.

    I'm about to geek out on good technique features that also protect back/shoulders, feeling like I have a little tiny permission, but I'll hide it in a spoiler to make it easy to ignore for people who don't care.
    IMO, there are two main areas of concern in shoulders/upper back, when it comes to rowing technique:

    1. Rotator cuff, and the associated connective tissues. Partly that risk comes from imbalance, since rowing is only upper body pull. (Smart people do some upper body push exercises to balance stresses.) Part of the risk comes from suboptimal technique.

    2. Spine, generally. Back troubles are easy to create.

    For me, protecting shoulders and back means focusing on: (A) Prep out of the finish, and (B) creating structure to transfer power during the drive, distinguishing which muscles create structure vs. generate power, in different parts of the stroke.

    All of the arm extension and forward body angle happen right after the finish. My arms have accelerated the last fraction of the drive, almost a snap. They immediately move away from my body at that same speed: Quick in, smooth turn, quick out. (If someone has a tendency to pause at the so-called finish, a quicker arms-away on the rowing machine will tend to drop split a second or two, almost for free. It lets the flywheel keep spinning fast.)

    Length is important for better splits, so it's tempting to extend the arms away from the armpits/shoulders to get more upper body length: Not a good idea. That stresses the small muscles/tendons, which can't contribute much to power. Instead, I want my shoulders packed – stabilized – pulled down and arms connected to the torso. One of my coaches talked about imagining squeezing a tennis ball between the shoulder blades, really full lat engagement.

    Forward body swing happens next, smoothly, after the arms-away - as if the arms (still packed at shoulder!) pull the torso forward. The body swing isn't bending the spine, it's coming from the big hip joints. (What I tell new rowers, and remind myself, is to think of those bird toys that sit on the edge of a water glass, dip their beak in the water, swing back up on an axle, then down again. The hips are where that axle is.) My torso should be a firm unit, core engaged 360 degrees to maintain the straight back: It’s the angle of back to legs that changes.

    What I want is upper body engagement: My shoulders not forward of the torso, but linked to it firmly with the lats. Upper shoulders down.

    Me, I loooove to over-use the upper body. IME, that seems somewhat more common in male new rowers than female ones as a fault, but I need to have all the faults, it seems like. Part of that is a temptation is to use the upper traps, because they're kind of big. Raising the shoulders makes it feel like the upper body is working more. It's not helpful, because it’s not useful (powerful) work.

    After the forward (recovery) arms-away and body swing, the slide’s tilt, plus relaxation, carry me up to the catch, shins vertical. Then all that body set-up, described above, starts to do work, during the drive phase.

    During the legs & swing part of the drive, my upper body’s job is to create/maintain structure. The structure’s job is to transfer power from the big leg muscles. I want to suspend my body weight between the handle and the foot-stretchers. In the first phase of the drive, I need to augment that raw weight with a strong push (almost like a jump, but smooth) from the legs. The arms are just cables, the shoulders and back structure help transfer power through the body. Upper body is not doing power generation, at this phase.

    My first coach would say “don’t be a taco!” Bending the back into a c-shape (taco) is hard on the back. The spine is weak, moved by small muscles, not powerful. The core (all the way around) is more important, and the glutes/hamstrings do a lot of the power work in the body swing part of the drive.

    Ideally, the glutes are not pinned, as one might assume, by pressure against the seat. I mentioned suspending weight between handles and foot-stretcher: I want that suspension to continue all the way from the catch to the finish. There won’t be airspace between butt and seat (or the seat will escape), but there can/should be a slight unweighting or decompression of butt on seat all the way through the drive. The drive is over when that can’t be sustained.

    So. TL;DR: The major points are that I want shoulders down, lats firm. Until the arms part at the end of the drive, my arms just transfer power. An engaged upper body makes that power transfer work, and protects the shoulders. I strive to suspend my body weight to allow glutes/hamstrings to do the body swing. The body swing is primarily a pivot-like movement in the hip joints. During the whole rowing stroke, the torso is a single core-engaged straight unit, protecting the spine.

    Interesting, thanks!
    I'm going to pay more attention next time I row. It's not a rotator cuff issue, I think. More spine/posture related, perhaps I'm holding my back too straight (if that's even possible) or perhaps my back muscle are simply a bit weak. But I'll hopefully have a better idea next time I row, based on your explanations.

    So today I did a rowing session: 6714m in 35 minutes - 65% in Z3 and the rest in Z2 or lower.

    I paid attention to my technique. That suspending weight thing (slight lift-off of butt) is tricky, not sure if I got that right but my butt cheeks were definitely feeling the burn 😁
    As for the upper body, still discomfort in the back after a while (just below bra strap height), the only thing that seems to help is bending forward/relaxing the back just a bit (for the whole movement, not any particular phase) so perhaps I was overextending when I thought I was keeping my back straight.

    It's certainly possible that it's a postural thing.

    It's hard to say in the abstract what it could be: That sounds like roughly the spot where the lower traps and upper lats overlap. I don't know whether this makes sense, but both those muscle groups want to be engaged, but not tense, especially during the leg part of the drive. (Is engaged but relaxed a thing? 🤔) One needs the traps to be down, not letting shoulders come up, but they're not really doing power work during leg drive. I perceive the lats as the main structure-creators for power transfer from legs to handle, but that maybe an individual perception thing. In any case, I think it's the whole body of the lats doing that, not just upper. So, yeah, maybe something like working the traps too hard to be extra-upright?

    Getting the suspension into the stroke really is hard, I think. It seems slightly less hard during the legs phase (I have to focus on not opening the body prematurely, or my weight drops back onto the seat sooner), but significantly more hard from the body swing to especially the arms.

    I know I've said this here before, but a mind-blowing thing for me was watching a really good collegiate rower (sitting in the seat in front of me in a boat) rowing arms only (i.e., staying in the body open/layback position, just using arms) and her glutes were very visibly de-compressing on the seat. Just remarkable. (She did go on to be one of the top female rowers in the world, multi-Olympic and Worlds medalist, so I guess it's not too surprising that even in college she could do quasi-magical things. 😉)
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 22,823 Member
    It's good to see you back @MikePfirrman: I'd wondered how you were doing, in these days we haven't heard from you. Glad that the worst seems to be past - hope it's all good from here for you!
  • LazyBlondeChef
    LazyBlondeChef Posts: 1,445 Member
    After a break I've started EPIC II
    Today was Day 2 - Compound Leg Workout
  • JDMac82
    JDMac82 Posts: 2,822 Member
    Elliptical 5 mins
    50 Pushups
    50 Crunches
    15 Wide Grip Pull-ups
    50 Jumping Jaxs
    50 Mtn Climbers
    15 Wipers

    12/9/6
    Iso Landmine Tricep Exts
    Iso Landmine Curls
    50 Supine Bike/ Rev Crunches
    Barbell Curls
    Skull Crushers
    50 Frog X/ Heel Taps
    Rope Exts back to Stack
    Seated Bicep Curls (low pulley system)
    50 Knee Tucks/ Hip Lifts
    Kickbacks
    Incline Seated Dbell Curls rotate palm out at top
    50 Leg Tucks / Flutter Kicks
    Waiter Curls
    Overhead Press
    50 Choppers / Cable Crunches

    900 Total Reps
  • dralicephd
    dralicephd Posts: 154 Member
    After a day off yesterday (I was sore from my "easy Sunday" Hatha Yoga! :neutral: ), I was back to the elliptical today. My goal today was to just focus on heart health while being mindful of not reinjuring my quad. What this looked like: 40 minutes of steady Zone 3 (no intervals); 2 miles. I felt good, but HR was at upper end of Zone 3. Perhaps I should just "keep on keepin' on" here until I can do this same pace at a lower part of Zone 3. That might help prevent further injury.
  • MikePfirrman
    MikePfirrman Posts: 2,960 Member
    Did 10K on the rower today. Likely harder than I should have but felt OK. HRM said it reached 93% max but I have a feeling that was a glitch. Really tried to cap it at around 160 (roughly 82% of max or so).
  • Lietchi
    Lietchi Posts: 3,291 Member
    My strength training has been horribly inconsistent lately, so progress has been stalled.
    Today's workout:
    4 sets landmine deadlifts
    4 sets assisted pull-ups
    4 sets cable rows
    3 sets dumbell side raises
    2 sets cable biceps curls
  • LazyBlondeChef
    LazyBlondeChef Posts: 1,445 Member
    EPIC II / Day 3 - Upper Body Workout
    Short Walk on Treadmill
  • swimmom_1
    swimmom_1 Posts: 449 Member
    Did 250 minutes/18 miles on my Elliptical. I had a nursing dinner conference at a Farm to Table restaurant and figured I would have some items I'm not usually eating and wanted to make sure I had enough for a deficit.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 22,823 Member
    Stationary bike again, 16,491 meters from a 15k + 4' CD workout. 53% of the time in Z3, the rest below; HR peaked at a 142bpm, about 70% HR reserve.

    A few rounds of sun salutations again, too, before breakfast.
  • JDMac82
    JDMac82 Posts: 2,822 Member
    50 Skier Warm Up & Stretching
    1Mile Jog
    120 Stairs (Tower Climb)
    .5 Sprint
    Tower Climb
    Repeat X 3
    Cool down walk & Stretching
  • J72FIT
    J72FIT Posts: 5,926 Member
    edited December 2021
    7-8 am:
    Warm-Up
    Elliptical - 1mile (8m)

    Mobility - (15m)

    Strength: Shoulders/Legs
    HSPU: 1-2-Failure (6r) (9r)
    Face Pull: 3x12r (36r)
    RDL: 3x12r (36r)
    Squat: 3x12r (36r)

    Meditate - (5m)