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What are some of your unpopular opinions about food?

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  • SuzySunshine99SuzySunshine99 Member Posts: 1,768 Member Member Posts: 1,768 Member
    "plant based" is totally misleading and think needs to be better regulated.

    So true. Pretty much everything now says "plant based".

    'Plant based food is defined as a finished product consisting of ingredients derived from plants that include vegetables, fruits, whole grains, nuts, seeds and/or legumes.'

    Which is basically every type of food. So reeses have peanuts, does that mean they are plant based?

    Not really...it's my understanding that if it's labeled "plant based", that means there are no animal products used. So, reeses would not be labeled plant based.

    It's a way of saying "vegan" without saying "vegan". Which is a distinction because not everyone who does not eat animal products is a vegan. They might still wear leather, silk, etc.
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Member Posts: 23,819 Member Member Posts: 23,819 Member
    "plant based" is totally misleading and think needs to be better regulated.

    So true. Pretty much everything now says "plant based".

    'Plant based food is defined as a finished product consisting of ingredients derived from plants that include vegetables, fruits, whole grains, nuts, seeds and/or legumes.'

    Which is basically every type of food. So reeses have peanuts, does that mean they are plant based?

    Not really...it's my understanding that if it's labeled "plant based", that means there are no animal products used. So, reeses would not be labeled plant based.

    It's a way of saying "vegan" without saying "vegan". Which is a distinction because not everyone who does not eat animal products is a vegan. They might still wear leather, silk, etc.

    You'd think so, but there are "plant-based" products that include dairy. Marie Callender's, for example, just came out with two "plant-based" pot pies -- one with faux beef and one with faux chicken . . . but there is dairy in the pie dough. It's a free-for-all.

    (I agree with you that most people would expect it to be what you said, "vegan" without saying it).
  • RelCanonicalRelCanonical Member Posts: 3,815 Member Member Posts: 3,815 Member
    "plant based" is totally misleading and think needs to be better regulated.

    So true. Pretty much everything now says "plant based".

    'Plant based food is defined as a finished product consisting of ingredients derived from plants that include vegetables, fruits, whole grains, nuts, seeds and/or legumes.'

    Which is basically every type of food. So reeses have peanuts, does that mean they are plant based?

    Not really...it's my understanding that if it's labeled "plant based", that means there are no animal products used. So, reeses would not be labeled plant based.

    It's a way of saying "vegan" without saying "vegan". Which is a distinction because not everyone who does not eat animal products is a vegan. They might still wear leather, silk, etc.

    You'd think so, but there are "plant-based" products that include dairy. Marie Callender's, for example, just came out with two "plant-based" pot pies -- one with faux beef and one with faux chicken . . . but there is dairy in the pie dough. It's a free-for-all.

    (I agree with you that most people would expect it to be what you said, "vegan" without saying it).

    Ah, Marie Callendar taking advantage of unregulated buzz terms for marketing. I'd like to learn a thing or two from their marketing team, lol.
  • SuzySunshine99SuzySunshine99 Member Posts: 1,768 Member Member Posts: 1,768 Member
    "plant based" is totally misleading and think needs to be better regulated.

    So true. Pretty much everything now says "plant based".

    'Plant based food is defined as a finished product consisting of ingredients derived from plants that include vegetables, fruits, whole grains, nuts, seeds and/or legumes.'

    Which is basically every type of food. So reeses have peanuts, does that mean they are plant based?

    Not really...it's my understanding that if it's labeled "plant based", that means there are no animal products used. So, reeses would not be labeled plant based.

    It's a way of saying "vegan" without saying "vegan". Which is a distinction because not everyone who does not eat animal products is a vegan. They might still wear leather, silk, etc.

    You'd think so, but there are "plant-based" products that include dairy. Marie Callender's, for example, just came out with two "plant-based" pot pies -- one with faux beef and one with faux chicken . . . but there is dairy in the pie dough. It's a free-for-all.

    (I agree with you that most people would expect it to be what you said, "vegan" without saying it).

    That's pretty terrible. In that case, they could just say "vegetarian" and not be deceptive.

    I guess that's another example of why you have to read the ingredients if it's something that's important to you.
    edited August 4
  • SuzySunshine99SuzySunshine99 Member Posts: 1,768 Member Member Posts: 1,768 Member
    Ohhh...I see how Marie Callendar's is getting away with it. Their packaging says "Made with plant-based protein." They don't say the whole pie is plant-based, just the protein. Very deceptive, but technically correct.
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Member Posts: 23,819 Member Member Posts: 23,819 Member
    Ohhh...I see how Marie Callendar's is getting away with it. Their packaging says "Made with plant-based protein." They don't say the whole pie is plant-based, just the protein. Very deceptive, but technically correct.

    Oops, sorry for the misinformation! I saw someone discussing it on Twitter and didn't look at the picture closely enough. :(
  • SuzySunshine99SuzySunshine99 Member Posts: 1,768 Member Member Posts: 1,768 Member
    Ohhh...I see how Marie Callendar's is getting away with it. Their packaging says "Made with plant-based protein." They don't say the whole pie is plant-based, just the protein. Very deceptive, but technically correct.

    Oops, sorry for the misinformation! I saw someone discussing it on Twitter and didn't look at the picture closely enough. :(

    It's still not right. It's not a disaster for people who eat a plant-based diet because they think it's healthier. But, for an ethical vegan like yourself, that's obviously not okay. I'm not sure why a company would want to tick off their consumers.
  • sparklyyeahsparklyyeah Member Posts: 16 Member Member Posts: 16 Member
    Nutella is an oversweet insult to both chocolate and hazelnuts.

    Nutella tastes like cheap and nasty chocolate Christmas tree decorations 🤮
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 16,468 Member Member, Premium Posts: 16,468 Member
    "plant based" is totally misleading and think needs to be better regulated.

    So true. Pretty much everything now says "plant based".

    'Plant based food is defined as a finished product consisting of ingredients derived from plants that include vegetables, fruits, whole grains, nuts, seeds and/or legumes.'

    Which is basically every type of food. So reeses have peanuts, does that mean they are plant based?

    Not really...it's my understanding that if it's labeled "plant based", that means there are no animal products used. So, reeses would not be labeled plant based.

    It's a way of saying "vegan" without saying "vegan". Which is a distinction because not everyone who does not eat animal products is a vegan. They might still wear leather, silk, etc.

    You'd think so, but there are "plant-based" products that include dairy. Marie Callender's, for example, just came out with two "plant-based" pot pies -- one with faux beef and one with faux chicken . . . but there is dairy in the pie dough. It's a free-for-all.

    (I agree with you that most people would expect it to be what you said, "vegan" without saying it).

    That's pretty terrible. In that case, they could just say "vegetarian" and not be deceptive.

    I guess that's another example of why you have to read the ingredients if it's something that's important to you.

    I suspect (with a mental sigh) that there are people who think it would be good to eat more "plant based" but who don't want to eat "vegetarian" food because that sounds icky. Just a guess, though.

    Y'know, at some point, I do think people just need to take the responsibility for reading and understanding ingredients lists.

    It's pointless to establish arcane legal definitions of *every possible* adjective that could be used for marketing. The definitions would be heavily influenced by producers' lobbying. The general public would not read the arcane legal definitions anyway, and would keep making assumptions about the products based on their own understanding of the terms.

    I'm not arguing against all labeling laws here (ingredient lists shouldn't lie, nutritional info is useful, etc.), but there's a limit to what's going to achieve practical utility for the public.

    Do you know what pesticides can be used on "organic" foods? Betcha a lot of people think the answer is "none". It's so not. :lol:
  • VegjoyPVegjoyP Member Posts: 941 Member Member Posts: 941 Member
    "plant based" is totally misleading and think needs to be better regulated.

    So true. Pretty much everything now says "plant based".

    'Plant based food is defined as a finished product consisting of ingredients derived from plants that include vegetables, fruits, whole grains, nuts, seeds and/or legumes.'

    Which is basically every type of food. So reeses have peanuts, does that mean they are plant based?

    Plant based.means no animal or dairy ingredients in finished product. It is for people transitioning to a WFPB diet, people who want alternatives to animal products and to distinguish product as not strictly " vegan"- veganism is a lifestyle and involves ethical / spiritual or animal activism. Peanuts, soy and tree nuts are plant based. The product may list allergies for people with sensitivity or allergy.
  • ejbronteejbronte Member Posts: 842 Member Member Posts: 842 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    "plant based" is totally misleading and think needs to be better regulated.

    So true. Pretty much everything now says "plant based".

    'Plant based food is defined as a finished product consisting of ingredients derived from plants that include vegetables, fruits, whole grains, nuts, seeds and/or legumes.'

    Which is basically every type of food. So reeses have peanuts, does that mean they are plant based?

    Not really...it's my understanding that if it's labeled "plant based", that means there are no animal products used. So, reeses would not be labeled plant based.

    It's a way of saying "vegan" without saying "vegan". Which is a distinction because not everyone who does not eat animal products is a vegan. They might still wear leather, silk, etc.

    You'd think so, but there are "plant-based" products that include dairy. Marie Callender's, for example, just came out with two "plant-based" pot pies -- one with faux beef and one with faux chicken . . . but there is dairy in the pie dough. It's a free-for-all.

    (I agree with you that most people would expect it to be what you said, "vegan" without saying it).

    That's pretty terrible. In that case, they could just say "vegetarian" and not be deceptive.

    I guess that's another example of why you have to read the ingredients if it's something that's important to you.

    I suspect (with a mental sigh) that there are people who think it would be good to eat more "plant based" but who don't want to eat "vegetarian" food because that sounds icky. Just a guess, though.

    Y'know, at some point, I do think people just need to take the responsibility for reading and understanding ingredients lists.

    It's pointless to establish arcane legal definitions of *every possible* adjective that could be used for marketing. The definitions would be heavily influenced by producers' lobbying. The general public would not read the arcane legal definitions anyway, and would keep making assumptions about the products based on their own understanding of the terms.

    I'm not arguing against all labeling laws here (ingredient lists shouldn't lie, nutritional info is useful, etc.), but there's a limit to what's going to achieve practical utility for the public.

    Do you know what pesticides can be used on "organic" foods? Betcha a lot of people think the answer is "none". It's so not. :lol:

    I'm an inveterate label-reader: it started when our mom entered the hospital and required a drastic change of diet, mostly reduction in salt. We went to the grocery store, and, if we normally ate it and it had a label, we read it. If we didn't like how it reflected on the new eating habits entering our household, we left it on the shelf. Long story short, I ended up learning how to cook so that I could have more control over what was being served.

    But I will happily roam the aisles looking at ingredients and nutritional data till the cows come home. Luckily, my friend, who shops with me, is also a reader. So we mosey along together.
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 16,468 Member Member, Premium Posts: 16,468 Member
    ejbronte wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    "plant based" is totally misleading and think needs to be better regulated.

    So true. Pretty much everything now says "plant based".

    'Plant based food is defined as a finished product consisting of ingredients derived from plants that include vegetables, fruits, whole grains, nuts, seeds and/or legumes.'

    Which is basically every type of food. So reeses have peanuts, does that mean they are plant based?

    Not really...it's my understanding that if it's labeled "plant based", that means there are no animal products used. So, reeses would not be labeled plant based.

    It's a way of saying "vegan" without saying "vegan". Which is a distinction because not everyone who does not eat animal products is a vegan. They might still wear leather, silk, etc.

    You'd think so, but there are "plant-based" products that include dairy. Marie Callender's, for example, just came out with two "plant-based" pot pies -- one with faux beef and one with faux chicken . . . but there is dairy in the pie dough. It's a free-for-all.

    (I agree with you that most people would expect it to be what you said, "vegan" without saying it).

    That's pretty terrible. In that case, they could just say "vegetarian" and not be deceptive.

    I guess that's another example of why you have to read the ingredients if it's something that's important to you.

    I suspect (with a mental sigh) that there are people who think it would be good to eat more "plant based" but who don't want to eat "vegetarian" food because that sounds icky. Just a guess, though.

    Y'know, at some point, I do think people just need to take the responsibility for reading and understanding ingredients lists.

    It's pointless to establish arcane legal definitions of *every possible* adjective that could be used for marketing. The definitions would be heavily influenced by producers' lobbying. The general public would not read the arcane legal definitions anyway, and would keep making assumptions about the products based on their own understanding of the terms.

    I'm not arguing against all labeling laws here (ingredient lists shouldn't lie, nutritional info is useful, etc.), but there's a limit to what's going to achieve practical utility for the public.

    Do you know what pesticides can be used on "organic" foods? Betcha a lot of people think the answer is "none". It's so not. :lol:

    I'm an inveterate label-reader: it started when our mom entered the hospital and required a drastic change of diet, mostly reduction in salt. We went to the grocery store, and, if we normally ate it and it had a label, we read it. If we didn't like how it reflected on the new eating habits entering our household, we left it on the shelf. Long story short, I ended up learning how to cook so that I could have more control over what was being served.

    But I will happily roam the aisles looking at ingredients and nutritional data till the cows come home. Luckily, my friend, who shops with me, is also a reader. So we mosey along together.

    Yup, I'm a reader, too. It always confounds me when people talk about "hidden sugar" in soup, catsup, spaghetti sauce, and what-not: It's right there on the label (yeah, there are a lot of different names for it . . . still not that hard, IMO).

    The "plant based" term seems a little similar, but maybe a little less obvious when one gets into mycoproteins and that sort of thing. It doesn't seem like a huge burden to ask people to understand what ingredients they're willing to eat, and it's more direct than creating legal definitions (that virtually no one will read) for more abstract adjectives like "plant based".

    I probably got this ingredient-reading initially from being vegetarian, but it's a long-term habit now.
  • AthijadeAthijade Member Posts: 2,158 Member Member Posts: 2,158 Member
    ejbronte wrote: »

    I'm an inveterate label-reader: it started when our mom entered the hospital and required a drastic change of diet, mostly reduction in salt. We went to the grocery store, and, if we normally ate it and it had a label, we read it. If we didn't like how it reflected on the new eating habits entering our household, we left it on the shelf. Long story short, I ended up learning how to cook so that I could have more control over what was being served.

    But I will happily roam the aisles looking at ingredients and nutritional data till the cows come home. Luckily, my friend, who shops with me, is also a reader. So we mosey along together.

    I read every label, even if I have read it before. I have a soy allergy along with a medical condition that is food sensitive so it is so important to make sure that a food is safe. While I love cooking, there are times I just don't want to so having some safe easy to prepare items in the freezer or pantry is important (I also have chronic fatigue so sometimes cooking is just not happening). Luckily it is just me shopping so I don't have to worry about how long it takes.
  • ejbronteejbronte Member Posts: 842 Member Member Posts: 842 Member
    Athijade wrote: »
    ejbronte wrote: »

    I'm an inveterate label-reader: it started when our mom entered the hospital and required a drastic change of diet, mostly reduction in salt. We went to the grocery store, and, if we normally ate it and it had a label, we read it. If we didn't like how it reflected on the new eating habits entering our household, we left it on the shelf. Long story short, I ended up learning how to cook so that I could have more control over what was being served.

    But I will happily roam the aisles looking at ingredients and nutritional data till the cows come home. Luckily, my friend, who shops with me, is also a reader. So we mosey along together.

    I read every label, even if I have read it before. I have a soy allergy along with a medical condition that is food sensitive so it is so important to make sure that a food is safe. While I love cooking, there are times I just don't want to so having some safe easy to prepare items in the freezer or pantry is important (I also have chronic fatigue so sometimes cooking is just not happening). Luckily it is just me shopping so I don't have to worry about how long it takes.

    I'm so sorry about your conditions; I'm lucky not to have any that I know of; but I have family and friends who do, including apple/mango allergies and celiac disease, so caution in serving is important. It's instructive to see how often wheat products and apple sneak their way into things.
  • EvamuttEvamutt Member Posts: 1,714 Member Member Posts: 1,714 Member
    I REALLY dislike eating out
  • VegjoyPVegjoyP Member Posts: 941 Member Member Posts: 941 Member
    Evamutt wrote: »
    I REALLY dislike eating out

    Oh my me too!! Big time!!
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Member Posts: 5,662 Member Member Posts: 5,662 Member
    I miss it. And I'm sad about great or fun neighborhood restaurants in my city closing.
  • ejbronteejbronte Member Posts: 842 Member Member Posts: 842 Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    I miss it. And I'm sad about great or fun neighborhood restaurants in my city closing.

    I like eating out too: among other pleasures, it's a great way to "visit" other countries through their food. We're New Yorkers, and my ex-boyfriend and I made a project of trying out a different cuisine once a month. We were together for more than five years and broke up before we went through our options.
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