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  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 32,721 Member
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    Katmary71 wrote: »
    @moonangel12 Lettuce leaf basil would be fun to grow! I love mints too, what do you do with them? I mostly use them in water, I have spearmint, orange mint, and berries and cream. I bought a packet of mixed mints and none have sprouted. Chocolate mint is good on strawberries and balsamic over ice cream! My aunt introduced me to getting good block feta and cutting it in chunks and wrapping in mint, that's pretty awesome! I bought my seeds from Baker's Creek which has a good reputation but my lemon balm didn't start either. I ordered a new African basil and they said it needs to be hot to germinate so I'm still waiting but it's hit 90s and nothing.

    Do you grow other herbs? I have two different kinds of oregano, marjoram, rosemary, lavender, basil, mints, evening primose, pinapple sage, regular sage, parsley, chives, echinacea, chamomile, dill, stevia, and I think that's it. My herb garden area was my first garden, I'd eventually like a bay laurel tree as well. I have a few others I just started like anise hyssop, I'd like to get a good selection for tea.

    My first zucchini are about ready, woohoo!

    The bolded might be a hidden blessing, just sayin'. Lemon balm is pretty close to the most thuggy, spready thing I've ever grown - spreads by both roots and copious seeds, it seems. Other things in the mint family are aggressive, but IME lemon balm takes it to a whole new level. For sure, it's the worst herb that way that I've grown - worse than the other mints, worse than chives . . .

    There are some ornamentals I wish I'd never planted (one low sedum, a particular campanula, maybe Aristolochia clematitis (Birthwort) . . .), but even considered among those, lemon balm is a thug. If you get some growing, I'd recommend keeping it in a pot, keeping the pot on hard surfaces far from soil where it could seed.
  • yirara
    yirara Posts: 9,508 Member
    edited May 2021
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    My berry bushes might not carry fruit this year, given the endless storms and cold rain. I just bought a cherry tomato bush that does carry tomatoes. They only need to grow more and ripen. Maybe I will get something edible after all this year :D And now my wee balcony is full.
  • moonangel12
    moonangel12 Posts: 971 Member
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    Katmary71 wrote: »
    @moonangel12 Lettuce leaf basil would be fun to grow! I love mints too, what do you do with them? I mostly use them in water, I have spearmint, orange mint, and berries and cream. I bought a packet of mixed mints and none have sprouted. Chocolate mint is good on strawberries and balsamic over ice cream! My aunt introduced me to getting good block feta and cutting it in chunks and wrapping in mint, that's pretty awesome! I bought my seeds from Baker's Creek which has a good reputation but my lemon balm didn't start either. I ordered a new African basil and they said it needs to be hot to germinate so I'm still waiting but it's hit 90s and nothing.

    Do you grow other herbs? I have two different kinds of oregano, marjoram, rosemary, lavender, basil, mints, evening primose, pinapple sage, regular sage, parsley, chives, echinacea, chamomile, dill, stevia, and I think that's it. My herb garden area was my first garden, I'd eventually like a bay laurel tree as well. I have a few others I just started like anise hyssop, I'd like to get a good selection for tea.

    My first zucchini are about ready, woohoo!

    Tea is my main mint use, but now that I am doing AIP (auto immune protocol) I am relying more on fresh herbs for flavor so I am looking forward to some new uses this summer!

    I have a very similar list to yours: lavender (fave!!), oregano, rosemary (two types), thyme, lemon thyme, sage (and variegated sage which is beautiful! I am a sucker for variegated anything), chives, echinacea, German chamomile starting, hopefully some dill will pop up... I think I put out some anise hyssop seed as well. I do need to get some cilantro and parsley going, those are my main “everyday” herbs that I use.
    Quoting myself :lol: I do have a bay laurel in a pot that is doing really well this spring! I couldn’t tell late winter if it was starting to croak on me indoors, but after a few weeks outside it has new growth, yay! I got mine off of Etsy this last time (WaWas Garden). If anyone buys a plant don’t get it from the company that sells through Walmart (Hirt’s Gardens) - I bought one for myself and 2 gifts, all of them died. Pretty sure all three came with a bug infestation. Haven’t had any issues with the newest one...

  • Katmary71
    Katmary71 Posts: 6,708 Member
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    @AnnPT77 I'll definitely keep it in a pot, thanks! My regret surprisingly is lantana, I thought they'd stay medium-sized but they're huge, they're almost as tall as me and I have to cut them back or they're taller than the fence but they don't take much water which is good. I have grapevines from the greenbelt next to my yard that are in my trees, I'm disabled and can't feel my feet so I can't go on a ladder to get them out, I hate how it looks but not enough to hire someone to deal with them.
  • mtaratoot
    mtaratoot Posts: 13,528 Member
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    I am thinking about digging up the Artichoke Forest.

    I set a new personal record today. Nine. I steamed five last night and set them aside. I ate them earlier today. I just steamed four more and ate them. That's a lot of artichokes. I got poked several times putting the trimmed leaves into the compost bin while prepping, and there's even little thorns on the stems. Ouch. But I'm doing OK keeping up. I will let a half dozen open. They are really pretty, and the hummingbirds and bees like them.

    But seriously - there's a lot of them. I give a lot away, and I still have so many. I think I actually might dig them up this fall, set some aside, amend the soil, let it sit for a few months over winter, and plant back maybe a quarter of them. I can give the others away.

    Wow.
  • SuzanneC1l9zz
    SuzanneC1l9zz Posts: 454 Member
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    I have a row of teeny baby kale seedlings, and a few Swiss chard are starting to peek through as well 🎉 Pot veggies all have buds that are starting to open. Bees are busy in the raspberries. And to top it all off, hubby surprised me with 75L of bulk compost from the city site on Saturday. I didn't see the specs on it, but theirs is always good quality and it's been a few years since my beds have had any. I'm sure my plants will appreciate it!
  • MsCzar
    MsCzar Posts: 1,042 Member
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    Ugh! A deer lopped off the top 6" of one of my largest tomatoes not yet in flower. If it's a determinant, does that mean the plant is done before it's started?
  • mtaratoot
    mtaratoot Posts: 13,528 Member
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    MsCzar wrote: »
    Ugh! A deer lopped off the top 6" of one of my largest tomatoes not yet in flower. If it's a determinant, does that mean the plant is done before it's started?

    I bet it means it is now pruned. It will branch just below the damage. Make sure to support the two branches, and if you take an egg, blend it with water, put it in a spray bottle, and spray the plants, it can deter (at least a little bit) the giant ungulate rats.
  • MsCzar
    MsCzar Posts: 1,042 Member
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    Thanks, mtaratoot. Never heard of the egg trick before. I added netting to the tomato cages and will fence the entire area later this week.

    On a happier note: Peas! Not sure how to tell when they are officially ripe, but they are coming in nicely. Those deer better stay away!

    vpn49kyzdvlt.jpg

  • SuzanneC1l9zz
    SuzanneC1l9zz Posts: 454 Member
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    He looks quite happy there! I have some catnip seeds to plant so I'm sure a similar scene is in my future.

    The timbers that used to border my garden bed rotted into the ground, so the nails holding the twines to mark my rows were just sunk into the earth this year. That means the twines aren't taught, and a storm shifted them all, so now it's not clear where my rows actually are. I've had to stop weeding until things I want to keep make themselves obvious. But I got the kale weeded yesterday and will do the beans today. Getting there.
  • ReenieHJ
    ReenieHJ Posts: 9,724 Member
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    Katmary71 wrote: »
    Can you tell which pot has catnip? This was a few years ago but I have a few pictures of feral cats sitting in it, this must've been at the beginning of the season as I normally have a bunch of pots on the deck.

    so54ncg2ooby.jpg

    Haha, he's got a little sneer going on there that says 'stay away, this one's mine!'
  • ReenieHJ
    ReenieHJ Posts: 9,724 Member
    edited June 2021
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    My onions are looking pretty sad. :( I lost one cucumber hill so bought a plant instead of trying to grow seeds. BUT my sweet potato slips are rooting very well in water and I'll be sharing with my sister within the week and planting some in my garden as well. Keeping fingers crossed that those take off!! Other than that, green beans are growing, strawberries are doing well(except for the part my dog got into and dug a trench down through the middle of the bed :(), zucchini are now looking very nice and healthy, tomatoes will need their cages soon. The green peppers aren't doing great; for some reason we seem to have issues with growing peppers in our garden. :/ I remember last year out of 2 plants we might've gotten 6 peppers.

    Just a side note, because the weather this spring started off so warm compared to usual, every one was buying/planting earlier than normal(including myself). I should've waited because yesterday I went to Home Depot and their selection in the garden area was amazing!! Next year, I hope I can wait and be more patient.
  • ReenieHJ
    ReenieHJ Posts: 9,724 Member
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    Chipmunk question.....
    So, we have gray squirrels during the winter and an occasional red squirrel be-bopping around but see 1 chipmunk every few years it seems. Someone came through our yard sale this Saturday and was commenting about all the destruction chipmunks are causing his garden. I silently thought 'well TG we don't have those'. And I'll be damned yesterday there was one bouncing around our flowers in the front of my house. :/ I haven't noticed anything dying due to problems other than weather and a dog. So just curious what a cute little curious chipmunk might be capable of??
  • MsCzar
    MsCzar Posts: 1,042 Member
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    Anybody fancy a guess? This guy showed up at the edge of my spinach patch after the coriander and oregano died off. That area of the garden had a few wildflowers last year, so I am hesitant to pull. Then again, I feel very silly tending to what is probably just a big ol' weed. Not seeing anything else quite like it in the surrounds. Guess time will tell, eh?

    pvitwdclvlcm.jpg
    bod6i102q70r.jpg
  • mtaratoot
    mtaratoot Posts: 13,528 Member
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    MsCzar wrote: »
    Anybody fancy a guess? This guy showed up at the edge of my spinach patch after the coriander and oregano died off. That area of the garden had a few wildflowers last year, so I am hesitant to pull. Then again, I feel very silly tending to what is probably just a big ol' weed. Not seeing anything else quite like it in the surrounds. Guess time will tell, eh?

    pvitwdclvlcm.jpg
    bod6i102q70r.jpg

    Looks like a weed to me.

  • ReenieHJ
    ReenieHJ Posts: 9,724 Member
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    @mtaratoot Add in some chickens or a soy crop and you'd have very little need to ever enter a grocery store. I'm jealous. :)
  • mtaratoot
    mtaratoot Posts: 13,528 Member
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    @ReenieHJ

    Well... also will want to flood a part or the property to grow some rice, and I definitely need a bacon tree. I keep looking for seedlings. I can't find them.

    I was pleased to see a couple volunteer (or overwintered) nasturtium. I hadn't planted there yet and now I won't. I have odd little microclimates, and rotating where I put things like tomatoes is tough. I am tempted to carve out some more space and put a chunk of ground that used to be strawberries (and eventually just weeds) back in production. The area among the fruit trees is an area I'm trying to sort of turn into a meadow. Over the last ten or 15 years, I've been expanding the amount of giant camas (Camassia leichtlinii) that grows out there. I just started collecting seeds yesterday. I collect them for several weeks, and when they're done, I use a string trimmer to reduce fire risk back there. In autumn, I spread the seeds. I started from a handful of bulbs and have expanded to a nice stand of the stuff.

    Come by and get a couple artichokes. I have enough to share :wink:
  • Katmary71
    Katmary71 Posts: 6,708 Member
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    @mtaratoot what zone are you in? I just started nasturtiums not realizing they don't do well in the heat but a local garden group commented about it, I moved them to a shadier area but they aren't growing fast now, I'm in 9B.