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::Diabetic question:: what foods help lower your A1c

ozzra8ozzra8 Posts: 79Member Member Posts: 79Member Member
I've been in the bariatric program for years now and keep getting denied because I can't get my A1c out of the double digits. I cut out all the bad carbs but still have high glucose readings eating good carbs (mainly veggies)

Replies

  • concordanciaconcordancia Posts: 4,651Member Member Posts: 4,651Member Member
    Ironically, it may be that you need to lose the weight. Your liver may pump out too much glucose and you may be extremely insulin resistant if you have enough extra weight to be in a bariatric program.

    Some people have a strong reaction to even commonly labelled "good" carbs like whole grains and beans. Some people even have sugar spikes from protein sources. This is one reason so many diabetics swear by keto. That is not a recommendation, as I was personally miserable on keto and it didn't actually lower my fasting glucose at all.

    However, if you have double digit A1C, you should be on meds. How is that aspect coming along?

    Are you cleared for exercise? Even if you just start with 5 minutes a day, it can help with blood sugar levels.

    I recently started on Ozempic. I call it my chemical bypass. I am frequently naseous and only hungry after skipping meals. I also sleep a lot more than I used to. Frankly, it is miserable, maybe even more so than keto was, but I am doing some "diet skills" exercises to build new habits, so hopefully I can come off this crap in January and still be successful going forward.
  • ozzra8ozzra8 Posts: 79Member Member Posts: 79Member Member
    Thanks for the input. I've lost 70 lbs on my own since I started this weight-loss journey.. still have extremely high glucose lvls. Ive tried keto and Atkins and probably every other diet out there and still have high glucose readings. I also seem to butt heads with my nutritionists everytime I cut something from my diet or try a new diet. I pretty much get reprimanded like I'm a little child that doesn't understand her own body but it's my fault for being to honest with my care team thinking I didnt want to run into complications after surgery but now realize that they are all just as clueless as I am. so I'm pretty much going at it on my own at this point. When it comes down to it, I'm the one who is living with this illness and need to figure out how to take control before it destroys my body. I am on oral meds metformin and glipizide xl twice daily and on insulin lantus and humalin as well. They haven't tried me on any if the newer meds. no clue as to why. I'll ask my doctor about ozempic. I am also a very active person, no restrictions physically. I'm just a rear case where my body pretty much produces glucose even when fasting. I have high glucose readings.
  • ozzra8ozzra8 Posts: 79Member Member Posts: 79Member Member
    No sliding scale. I'm on 30 units of lantus twice a day and 50 units of humalin once a day. 1000mg of metformin in the am and 1500 in the pm. 10mg of glipizide xl twice a day. I had an intolerance to the metformin in the beginning but am fine now.

    I do eat carrots but no beets. Ill cut out there carrots and see if that helps. I switched to squash in place of potatoes but just realized that acorn squash is pretty high as well so cutting that out too. Spaghetti squash is still good. Also oatmeal. I eat steel cut oats in the am. Just found out that this can beet the root to my sugar spikes as well. Fingers crossed
  • LeslieMedicLeslieMedic Posts: 1Member Member Posts: 1Member Member
    The class of medication that both responders mentioned are called GLP-1 agonists. They mimic a hormone found in healthy adults that tends to be very low in diabetics. There are several classes of diabetic medicines that can cause weight gain in trying to normalize the blood sugar (several were mentioned above.) The GLP-1 meds are associated with weight loss, these are Ozempic, Trulicity, Victoza, Bydureon, and byetta. If your A1c is in the double digits, or even if you are not making headway on your current regimen, I urge you to go see an endocrinologist or at least talk to your doc about trying a newer medication. There is another class called SGLT-2 that can lead to weight loss and can help protect the kidneys while lowering your blood sugar.

    Your insulin regimen leaves a lot to be desired. You can help someone help you by checking your sugar multiple times per day, fasting, before meals, and before bed. I recommend that you make a chart and write these readings down by time of day.

    Please, go see someone informed and ask about the GLP-1s, find an exercise routine that helps to lower your insulin resistance, and be aware of the types and volume of food you are eating to get better control of your diabetes before you suffer severe complications.
  • ozzra8ozzra8 Posts: 79Member Member Posts: 79Member Member
    earlnabby wrote: »
    ozzra8 wrote: »
    No sliding scale. I'm on 30 units of lantus twice a day and 50 units of humalin once a day. 1000mg of metformin in the am and 1500 in the pm. 10mg of glipizide xl twice a day. I had an intolerance to the metformin in the beginning but am fine now.

    I do eat carrots but no beets. Ill cut out there carrots and see if that helps. I switched to squash in place of potatoes but just realized that acorn squash is pretty high as well so cutting that out too. Spaghetti squash is still good. Also oatmeal. I eat steel cut oats in the am. Just found out that this can beet the root to my sugar spikes as well. Fingers crossed

    You need to start counting total carbs. Do you log here at MFP? It is a quick and easy was to see how many carbs you are eating. If so, make sure you weigh all solids and semi solids and measure all liquids. Has your doctor or Registered Dietician given you a total carb number to stay under? If not, you need to talk to them. They may give you a daily number or a number to stay under per meal (I have been given a daily number) Have you taken classes taught by a Certified Diabetic Educator (most healthcare organizations offer them for those diagnosed with T2Dm or pre-diabetes). They can help you learn food substitutes. I find substituting turnips instead of potatoes in my stews significantly lowers the carb count.

    Individual foods don't matter as much as the totality of what you have eaten during the day. I can eat a teaspoon of sugar in my tea (4 grams of carbs) but that means I need to have a smaller piece of fruit or forego the bread on my sandwich so I can stay under my maximum of daily carbs.

    I've been seeing a nutritionist and endocrinologist for over a decade and not once have I been given a daily number of carbs. Just was taught the difference between good carbs and bad carbs and that "good carbs" under a certain net carb index shouldn't effect my blood sugar. My new nutritionist that I just started seeing (new insurance) doesn't want me on a diet at all stating that restricting food from my diet is only going to cause me to cheat. I literally laughed in her face asking if she read my file and said you do realize that I'm seeing you because of my diabetes not just my weight, right? So yeah.. I can't eat sugar or anything out of the good carb index even in moderation or I'll have sugars in the 400-500's and that's with taking all of the meds listed above.
  • ozzra8ozzra8 Posts: 79Member Member Posts: 79Member Member
    The class of medication that both responders mentioned are called GLP-1 agonists. They mimic a hormone found in healthy adults that tends to be very low in diabetics. There are several classes of diabetic medicines that can cause weight gain in trying to normalize the blood sugar (several were mentioned above.) The GLP-1 meds are associated with weight loss, these are Ozempic, Trulicity, Victoza, Bydureon, and byetta. If your A1c is in the double digits, or even if you are not making headway on your current regimen, I urge you to go see an endocrinologist or at least talk to your doc about trying a newer medication. There is another class called SGLT-2 that can lead to weight loss and can help protect the kidneys while lowering your blood sugar.

    Your insulin regimen leaves a lot to be desired. You can help someone help you by checking your sugar multiple times per day, fasting, before meals, and before bed. I recommend that you make a chart and write these readings down by time of day.

    Please, go see someone informed and ask about the GLP-1s, find an exercise routine that helps to lower your insulin resistance, and be aware of the types and volume of food you are eating to get better control of your diabetes before you suffer severe complications.

    I am seeing an endocrinologist. Been seeing one since I became a diabetic over a decade ago. I'm very much aware of the health risks and this is the #1 main reason why I was placed in the bariatric program because there is a very high chance that it will put my diabetes in remission. I apologize if I made anyone think that I'm not educated on my disease. I appreciate all the feed back but my initial question to the public was if anyone knew of any foods that help lower ones A1c. This is the knowledge I am seeking.
  • earlnabbyearlnabby Posts: 6,853Member Member Posts: 6,853Member Member
    ozzra8 wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    ozzra8 wrote: »
    No sliding scale. I'm on 30 units of lantus twice a day and 50 units of humalin once a day. 1000mg of metformin in the am and 1500 in the pm. 10mg of glipizide xl twice a day. I had an intolerance to the metformin in the beginning but am fine now.

    I do eat carrots but no beets. Ill cut out there carrots and see if that helps. I switched to squash in place of potatoes but just realized that acorn squash is pretty high as well so cutting that out too. Spaghetti squash is still good. Also oatmeal. I eat steel cut oats in the am. Just found out that this can beet the root to my sugar spikes as well. Fingers crossed

    You need to start counting total carbs. Do you log here at MFP? It is a quick and easy was to see how many carbs you are eating. If so, make sure you weigh all solids and semi solids and measure all liquids. Has your doctor or Registered Dietician given you a total carb number to stay under? If not, you need to talk to them. They may give you a daily number or a number to stay under per meal (I have been given a daily number) Have you taken classes taught by a Certified Diabetic Educator (most healthcare organizations offer them for those diagnosed with T2Dm or pre-diabetes). They can help you learn food substitutes. I find substituting turnips instead of potatoes in my stews significantly lowers the carb count.

    Individual foods don't matter as much as the totality of what you have eaten during the day. I can eat a teaspoon of sugar in my tea (4 grams of carbs) but that means I need to have a smaller piece of fruit or forego the bread on my sandwich so I can stay under my maximum of daily carbs.

    I've been seeing a nutritionist and endocrinologist for over a decade and not once have I been given a daily number of carbs. Just was taught the difference between good carbs and bad carbs and that "good carbs" under a certain net carb index shouldn't effect my blood sugar. My new nutritionist that I just started seeing (new insurance) doesn't want me on a diet at all stating that restricting food from my diet is only going to cause me to cheat. I literally laughed in her face asking if she read my file and said you do realize that I'm seeing you because of my diabetes not just my weight, right? So yeah.. I can't eat sugar or anything out of the good carb index even in moderation or I'll have sugars in the 400-500's and that's with taking all of the meds listed above.

    If you have been seeing the same medical professionals for 10 years and their advice is not working I would change doctors. Also, I am surprised your insurance will pay for a nutritionist. You should talk to your doctor about seeing an actual Registered Dietician. They have much more education and many of them specialize in diabetes.

    If you don't know how many grams of carbs you can eat, how do you know you are not eating too many of them? Overeating "good carbs" will affect your BG just as much as eating bad carbs. The amount will vary, but most newly diagnosed T2Dm will be given a number somewhere between 150-180 grams per day (or a max of 40-45 per meal with 10-15 grams allowed per snack) and adjusted in 3 or 6 months depending on what the A1c is doing.

    edited December 9
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 452Member Member Posts: 452Member Member
    Listen to earlnabby, she knows what she is talking about on this topic!
  • GottaBurnEmAllGottaBurnEmAll Posts: 7,266Member Member Posts: 7,266Member Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    Listen to earlnabby, she knows what she is talking about on this topic!

    Seconding this advice.
  • PurpleSparkles85PurpleSparkles85 Posts: 15Member, Premium Member Posts: 15Member, Premium Member
    Often doing the opposite of what you think is what you need to do. Fasting makes your liver kick up the glucose so your brain especially can function. They always told me to cut my protein. Well, proteins keep me satisfied so that I don’t eat junk carbs. Fiber keeps you satisfied too. My A1c is 5.7 on no meds with these 3 things. I agree, find new people to work with. And carbs are carbs, I don’t fall in with this net carbs or adding calories back in because of them. Everyone is different and what you do has to work for you. Are you sure you have no food allergies?
  • AT0M1CR00ST3RAT0M1CR00ST3R Posts: 4Member Member Posts: 4Member Member
    1. Reduce the carbs, big time. All carbs, not just sugar. Complex carbs become sugar eventually. T2. Portion control. This means COUNT CALORIES. Don't fall for that "balance carbs with protein" thing. This takes discipline. Log all food in the My Fitness Pal app. 3. Exercise. No need to explain the benefits of this. At least go walking if nothing else.
    You know these things already.
    Eat things like protein shakes, salad, eggs, chicken breast, and veggies. Do what I do and buy the Nutri Ninja Auto IQ blender, and buy Vega Organic Vegetable based protein powder (available at Costco) Have at least one shake a day. Try it or don't. This is what works for me. It may not work for me
  • DilvishDilvish Posts: 105Member Member Posts: 105Member Member
    this might help too https://diabetes.org.uk/research/research-round-up/research-spotlight/research-spotlight-low-calorie-liquid-diet

    You could also start by taking a daily multivitamin and an insoluble fiber (like psyllium) supplement and then just start a few days on healthy proteins and fats. What I am getting at is completely remove plant based foods for a day and check your A1C. Then gradually add low GI fruits and vegetables one per day and keep checking your sugars. Additionally make sure you are not eating anything processed (packaged) and start ensuring you make your food from raw natural sources.

    I also agree with a previous poster regarding your "care" team. Some doctors simply have no clue and rely far too much on prescription drugs to treat patients. If they can't seem to find a solution, it's time for a second or third opinion. I have personal experience with this. I saw a Neurologist about 20 years ago regarding the neuropathy in my legs. Fast forward to about 5 years ago: I got a second diagnosis (due to complications) from a different Neurologist and was shocked to find the the first diagnosis was far too generic...meaning the first Neurologist I saw gave me an incorrect diagnosis, either through lack of experience with the particular disorder or sheer ignorance. Either way a second diagnosis helped manage the disorder much better.

    Here is an explanation of the Diabetes and recommendations from the world's foremost Naturopathic Doctor, Andrew Weil https://drweil.com/health-wellness/body-mind-spirit/diabetes/diabetes-type-2/
    edited December 10
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