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Would you eat cricket protein?

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  • CSARdiverCSARdiver Posts: 5,701Member Member Posts: 5,701Member Member
    Throw some bacon on it and you've got a deal.

    Or dip it in chocolate. Makes everything better.
  • Sunshine_And_SandSunshine_And_Sand Posts: 1,137Member Member Posts: 1,137Member Member
    No. If I knew they were made of crickets, I would not try them unless it was life or death. I don't really like the taste of processed protein too much anyway and am picky about the ones I do eat on rare occasions, so there's no way I'd knowingly try bug based protein just to see if I like it...
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Posts: 20,811Member Member Posts: 20,811Member Member
    I wouldn't, but that is for ethical reasons. If I ate other animals, I would probably give cricket protein a try especially if it was in the form of a protein bar/cookie.
  • quiksylver296quiksylver296 Posts: 24,150Member Member Posts: 24,150Member Member
    I've eaten freeze-dried crickets. So, sure.
  • estherdragonbatestherdragonbat Posts: 4,853Member Member Posts: 4,853Member Member
    Have a look at ingredients - most food stuff percentages do not add up to 100 %. The rest are: bugs, beetles, mouse and rat droppings and other delightful additions...

    Not in strictly kosher products.
  • tbright1965tbright1965 Posts: 792Member, Premium Member Posts: 792Member, Premium Member
    If you've eaten food from a manufacturer, you've probably already eaten worse, so I don't see a problem with this.
  • tbright1965tbright1965 Posts: 792Member, Premium Member Posts: 792Member, Premium Member
    DemSwells wrote: »
    I have eaten crickets, huhu beetles and ants. I have no issue consuming insects. Sometimes by choice other times I down a few accidentally when walking through the woods mouth agape.

    Yep, reminds me that bicyclists have probably already consumed "mass quantities" of insects.

    Then there is the notion of the "web rider" on trails. The lead rider makes first contact with any spider webs on the trail.
  • heybalesheybales Posts: 16,542Member Member Posts: 16,542Member Member
    The cricket bars I had were just fine - the one version that had some non-ground up parts merely to show it was based on crickets - didn't want to do it with little legs showing.
    One was very un flavored for you to enjoy I guess the "natural" taste - just showed how much the normal flavoring of bars more than hid anything from what it was based on.
  • tbright1965tbright1965 Posts: 792Member, Premium Member Posts: 792Member, Premium Member
    DemSwells wrote: »
    DemSwells wrote: »
    I have eaten crickets, huhu beetles and ants. I have no issue consuming insects. Sometimes by choice other times I down a few accidentally when walking through the woods mouth agape.

    Yep, reminds me that bicyclists have probably already consumed "mass quantities" of insects.

    Then there is the notion of the "web rider" on trails. The lead rider makes first contact with any spider webs on the trail.

    Spider webs in the hair and face..the worst but funny in hindsight :D

    I avoid spider webs in the hair by not having much hair :)
  • pelerojapeleroja Posts: 3,979Member Member Posts: 3,979Member Member
    I haven't done the research to verify, but I have read a few articles indicating crickets as a food source have a very small ecological footprint compared to other proteins, so for that reason alone I'm interested. I'm a fairly adventurous eater and not too phased by the idea, especially ground rather than whole.
  • JeromeBarry1JeromeBarry1 Posts: 9,877Member Member Posts: 9,877Member Member
    Sure. Just last week I went to a website to order some cricket protein bars. Everything from that vendor was "out of stock" so they missed their chance.
  • mmapagsmmapags Posts: 7,599Member Member Posts: 7,599Member Member
    peleroja wrote: »
    I haven't done the research to verify, but I have read a few articles indicating crickets as a food source have a very small ecological footprint compared to other proteins, so for that reason alone I'm interested. I'm a fairly adventurous eater and not too phased by the idea, especially ground rather than whole.

    In addition, trapping cricket and grasshoppers is a form of integrated pest management for farmers. They then reduce pesticide use and provide a protein source.
  • hesn92hesn92 Posts: 5,401Member Member Posts: 5,401Member Member
    I guess. I don't really know why I would though. I wouldn't choose cricket protein over something else.
  • JetJaguarJetJaguar Posts: 631Member Member Posts: 631Member Member
    I'll try anything once.
  • Taz6o5Taz6o5 Posts: 3,442Member Member Posts: 3,442Member Member
  • amusedmonkeyamusedmonkey Posts: 9,315Member Member Posts: 9,315Member Member
    peleroja wrote: »
    I haven't done the research to verify, but I have read a few articles indicating crickets as a food source have a very small ecological footprint compared to other proteins, so for that reason alone I'm interested. I'm a fairly adventurous eater and not too phased by the idea, especially ground rather than whole.

    My issue with this argument is that it's idealistic rather than realistic. The reality of things is that current protein practices do have a large footprint. Crickets, as used in countries that don't consume them, are currently used more like protein powder. I would rather contribute to solving the waste problem of dairy than following a niche for bragging rights. If someone starts creating true protein products with cricket powder and it's affordable and palatable, I would gladly switch to cricket burgers, for example.
  • laurenq1991laurenq1991 Posts: 313Member Member Posts: 313Member Member
    I would. I considered it, in fact, when I saw one on Amazon. Then rationality won over curiosity...

    If crickets are a cheap source of protein, then why is that protein bar so expensive per gram of protein? I'll wait until (if ever) the process is streamlined enough to have a reasonable cost. As long as cheese is produced commercially, I see no real reason to switch to crickets unless crickets get exceptionally cheap. Whey is a waste product, after all, and that waste needs to go somewhere.

    Economies of scale and lack of government subsidies. Meat and dairy are heavily subsidized by the government so their price is way below the actual cost...it gives "government cheese" a whole new meaning.

    https://www.realagriculture.com/2018/02/u-s-dairy-subsidies-equal-73-percent-of-producer-returns-says-new-report/
  • Allie1618Allie1618 Posts: 36Member Member Posts: 36Member Member
    I found a few legs and a piece of a wing in my Panda Express once. Could have been a cricket. Tasted just like orange chicken.
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