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What new or revised public policy/law would make it easier for people to maintain a healthy weight?

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  • zeejane03zeejane03 Member Posts: 993 Member Member Posts: 993 Member
    I'd like to be able to use HSA money for durable exercise equipment.

    You should have to use it some reasonable amount for it to qualify. Ideally the way that would work is you'd sync some kind of app with your doctor's system. I say that from the perspective that your doctor is an expert whose job it is to help you, and knowing patient's exercise habits can help the doctor find the best plan for a lot of things, including depression.

    I think it would be awesome to be able to use HSA funds for exercise equipment! We had a horribly cold winter and I had to stop my walks. I looked into a treadmill but didn't have extra funds to buy one. It would have been great if I could have used our HSA to buy one.
  • h7463h7463 Member Posts: 626 Member Member Posts: 626 Member
    zeejane03 wrote: »
    I'd like to be able to use HSA money for durable exercise equipment.

    You should have to use it some reasonable amount for it to qualify. Ideally the way that would work is you'd sync some kind of app with your doctor's system. I say that from the perspective that your doctor is an expert whose job it is to help you, and knowing patient's exercise habits can help the doctor find the best plan for a lot of things, including depression.

    I think it would be awesome to be able to use HSA funds for exercise equipment! We had a horribly cold winter and I had to stop my walks. I looked into a treadmill but didn't have extra funds to buy one. It would have been great if I could have used our HSA to buy one.

    Wouldn't it be nice to buy healthy food before taxes as well... But that's not what the HSA is for, right...
  • SpadesheartSpadesheart Member Posts: 433 Member Member Posts: 433 Member
    Sooo while I don't quite believe this should be legislated against, it is interesting food for thought, or drink for thought.

    Pre high rates of obesity in the west, the primary beverage of choice was coffee or tea. They have done studies on this; the amount of coffee our grandparents drank dwarf what we consume today per person. The rates of coffee consumption decreased with the propagation and popularity of a new social beverage, the soft drink. Conversely, obesity rates started to steadily increase at this time.

    I believe this correlation is part causation, but it isn't the whole story. For example, Japan has a far greater breath of varieties of soda, and probably greater access, but they do not have the same issue. In this case, I think the variety really helps. Amusingly, this is slowly happening here, with new smaller brands making more niche seltzer and sodas, with lower calorie options. I believe this will at least partly sort itself out in a few decades with the changing market forces.
  • PhirrgusPhirrgus Member Posts: 1,904 Member Member Posts: 1,904 Member
    :D
    https://www.cnn.com/2019/03/25/health/sodas-sugary-drinks-policy-statement-study/index.html
    Physicians' groups have long taken a stand against high consumption of sugary drinks in the United States -- and now they are calling for several policies to limit access to sugar-sweetened beverages among children and teens.
    The American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Heart Association released policy recommendations on Monday targeted at federal, state and local lawmakers, encouraging them to implement policies that would reduce children's intake of sugary drinks, such as sodas, sports drinks and juice.

    Disclaimer: I know it's CNN which some have issues with, and some do not. I'd rather focus on the subject of the article which is in perfect keeping with this thread, rather than the source.

    OP, looks like you weren't the only one thinking this over.
  • CSARdiverCSARdiver Member Posts: 6,261 Member Member Posts: 6,261 Member
    CSARdiver wrote: »
    CSARdiver wrote: »
    No law will help, but will make things monumentally worse.

    Removing laws on the other hand would have tremendous benefit over time.

    What laws, in your opinion, are driving obesity rates in the US?

    Desire and ability are the primary drivers of obesity. Unless you are going to address these two root causes, then all else is nothing but show and wasted resources.

    What laws, objectively and historically, have positively influenced human behavior?

    I submit that those rewarding positive behavior tend to be successful, while those punishing desires tend to fail.



    I think I misunderstood what you wrote initially. When you said "Removing laws would have tremendous benefit over time" I thought you were referring to specific laws you'd like to see removed in order to address obesity. I think instead you were stating that there would be a general "tremendous benefit" to removing laws?

    More generally, if someone's desires are going to cause me harm, I consider it a success if a law makes it less likely they'll choose to fulfill that desire.

    Like the 18th Amendment?
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