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Lost in 5k Cardio, need help!

mszallarmszallar Posts: 33Member, Premium Member Posts: 33Member, Premium Member
Hello,

Currently looking at training programs to help me start running 5ks. I can usually run a 1.5 mile in 13-14 minutes, which includes some walking.

I'm no stranger to cardio, but just don't know where to go from here to accomplish the 5k.

All training programs I look at say walk, walk briskly, walk for X amount of time. Then repeat for longer sessions. Each session progresses.

I'm wondering, if I can run it, should I? Or is the walk a way to build endurance? Would I build endurance faster if I ran it if I could?


Looking for advice to increase speed and endurance over the next 60 days.

TIA!

Replies

  • MikePTYMikePTY Posts: 3,415Member, Premium Member Posts: 3,415Member, Premium Member
    I also agree with C25K. I did it a number of years ago and it helped a lot.

  • NorthCascadesNorthCascades Posts: 9,416Member Member Posts: 9,416Member Member
    Couch to 5k is popular because it works.

    If the first several days feel too easy - enjoy it while it lasts!

    You build endurance by enduring. Sounds trite but that's a central theme in exercise.
  • apullumapullum Posts: 4,505Member Member Posts: 4,505Member Member
    Doing too much too soon is a good way to get injured. It’s hard for a new runner to know how much is “too much.” A structured training program like C25K takes away the guesswork and has you build endurance at a safe pace.
  • firef1y72firef1y72 Posts: 1,539Member Member Posts: 1,539Member Member
    Another one for c25k.
    But also if you have a garmin viviactive 3 (think a few other models like the fenix 5 as well). Garmin coach is great, its 5k plan starts be assessing where you are now and then takes you to 5k (well it actually had me running 10k at one point in the plan but I was just trying to get out of the habit of walking and could run 20+ miles).
  • NorthCascadesNorthCascades Posts: 9,416Member Member Posts: 9,416Member Member
    🤯🤑🥳🏆🏃🧘⛹️🏃🛌🛀🏃🚶👨‍🦰

    🍞🥐🥖🥯🥨🥞🍔🍟🌽🧀🍓🍐🍉🥪🥗🌮🥙🍕
  • NorthCascadesNorthCascades Posts: 9,416Member Member Posts: 9,416Member Member
    And that's my story about learning to run.
  • BrianSharpeBrianSharpe Posts: 8,827Member Member Posts: 8,827Member Member
    I didn't use the C25K myself but it's helped a lot of people get to the starting line.

    Even if you're capable of running more I'd suggest working the program as there's more to running fitness than just the cardio aspect. There are quite a few other physiological adaptations going on and they take time.

    Running is one of those things that, if approached sensibly, you can enjoy for the rest of your life. Enjoy the journey. I must warn you though, 5Ks are a gateway race. The feeling you get crossing that finish line the first time is indescribable and your brain starts telling you that maybe a 10K might be fun or a half-marathon!
  • WholeFoods4LyfeWholeFoods4Lyfe Posts: 1,472Member Member Posts: 1,472Member Member
    Not to pile on, but another recommendation for C25K. I did it 8-9 years ago and eventually got to the point of running 4-6 miles a day several days a week. If you wanted, you could probably skip the first week or two, but honestly, I think that you still might find some benefit doing the entire program as written. Like someone else said upthread, it's about building up your endurance, it just makes sense to do the whole thing, it certainly can't hurt.
  • spiriteagle99spiriteagle99 Posts: 2,418Member Member Posts: 2,418Member Member
    C25k works for many, but not everyone likes it. It does get you in the habit of regular 30 minute sessions, 3 days a week. Consistency is key to improving. If you don't want to do 1 minute run intervals, you don't have to. You could start later in the program - i.e .5 minute runs, or just run on your own. If you are running outside, then pick a route that is 3 miles. Walk for 5 minutes, then start a very slow jog. Run as far as you can, then walk for 30 steps, then start jogging again. Cover the whole 3 miles, then cool down with a 5 minute walk. Next time you go out, see if you can run a bit farther. The key is to keep your pace slow and easy. That will allow you to go farther. If you're puffing and panting, you're going too fast. Don't run more than 4 days a week to start. It's best to allow your muscles, bones, tendons, etc. some time to heal between workouts. If you are running on the TM, it is even easier to keep the pace easy. Start with a walk, then increase by .1 until you are forced to run slowly. That is your starting pace. Again, run as long as you can, walk when you feel you have to, then start jogging again. When you can run the whole distance, at a very slow pace, then gradually increase the pace. But don't start out thinking you have to run a 10 minute mile. You don't.
  • grimendalegrimendale Posts: 2,193Member Member Posts: 2,193Member Member
    C25K is great, like everyone has been saying. It can be frustrating to start with, I know. A few years ago, I was regularly running 10+ miles at a stretch, but I fell off and had to start over again at the beginning of this year. Starting with one minute intervals was depressing, but I got through it and am better off for it now (training for a half marathon in November). There are some C25K programs that don't utilize the intervals (although I think there's some real benefit to them), so it might be worth looking around. You have to pace yourself, start slower than you probably want to, and build speed and distance slowly if you want to avoid injury.
  • oceangirl99oceangirl99 Posts: 127Member Member Posts: 127Member Member
    I tried C25K a few years ago and gave up. I lost a lot of weight through counting calories and then tried C25K again and found it quite easy so I did a really condensed version and got my self from couch 25K in about 3 or 4 weeks. I had been walking consistently almost daily for weeks before though. If you are reasonably fit, and not carrying around much extra weight you may not need the full program.
  • filovirus76filovirus76 Posts: 156Member Member Posts: 156Member Member
    My advice: Do whatever starting program you can find. C25K is one I hear a lot about, but have never done. But get a good pair or running shoes. Go to your local running shoe store and let them look at your gait. They will suggest a pair of shoes. They will probably suggest a pair that costs $100-120. These are the shoes you want.

    If you don't want to spend that much, Amazon will have the last years model of the same exact shoe for ~$60. Just make sure to get a good pair of shoes.
  • DisneyDude85DisneyDude85 Posts: 427Member Member Posts: 427Member Member
    I didn't use the C25K myself but it's helped a lot of people get to the starting line.

    Even if you're capable of running more I'd suggest working the program as there's more to running fitness than just the cardio aspect. There are quite a few other physiological adaptations going on and they take time.

    Running is one of those things that, if approached sensibly, you can enjoy for the rest of your life. Enjoy the journey. I must warn you though, 5Ks are a gateway race. The feeling you get crossing that finish line the first time is indescribable and your brain starts telling you that maybe a 10K might be fun or a half-marathon!

    I just finished my first 5k 3 weeks ago (as part of a 7 race series... in the summer... in Phoenix) and registered for the Rock n Roll Half in January Haha! Giving myself plenty of time to get ready. But yeah, that feeling of crossing the finish line was incredible.
  • DisneyDude85DisneyDude85 Posts: 427Member Member Posts: 427Member Member
    My advice: Do whatever starting program you can find. C25K is one I hear a lot about, but have never done. But get a good pair or running shoes. Go to your local running shoe store and let them look at your gait. They will suggest a pair of shoes. They will probably suggest a pair that costs $100-120. These are the shoes you want.

    If you don't want to spend that much, Amazon will have the last years model of the same exact shoe for ~$60. Just make sure to get a good pair of shoes.

    www.runningwarehouse.com also has a really good clearance section on their website and will let you return the shoes even after you have had a couple runs in them (I think you have like 3 months to try them).
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