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Is there a need for hiring personal trainer for my goals?

raven56706raven56706 Posts: 877Member, Premium Member Posts: 877Member, Premium Member
For those that know me, please be patient with me. Kind of tackling this debate for a week now.

a month ago, i hired a trainer to help me get back into shape. And for awhile, he was good at scheduling times and such. Now he still sends me workouts via text and asks for time as an accountability. But the in house class scheduling is becoming a pain and he cant make convenient times that work my schedule.

my total goal is to burn fat(yes i am fully aware that burning fat begins in the kitchen). But in terms of a workout plan, i just want a dual program that offers "homework" to do at home and at the gym, while incorporating my stationary bike.

is there a website or good workout builder out there? or maybe even a good workout database that you suggest.

any comments would be greatly appreciated

Replies

  • gottswaldgottswald Posts: 122Member, Premium Member Posts: 122Member, Premium Member
    Are you doing only steady state or also resistance training?
  • raven56706raven56706 Posts: 877Member, Premium Member Posts: 877Member, Premium Member
    gottswald wrote: »
    Are you doing only steady state or also resistance training?

    i am open to both. the one that my trainer is giving me is more crossfitty style workouts but mainly bodyweight. at the gym, i want to do more resistance training. more weights.
  • neugebauer52neugebauer52 Posts: 789Member Member Posts: 789Member Member
    The trainer's goal is to make money. Your goal is... Our gym offers "supervision / assistance" - there is always someone around I can ask - it's part of the deal, no extra cost.
  • BZAH10BZAH10 Posts: 5,433Member Member Posts: 5,433Member Member
    Have you had a clear, honest conversation with them about wanting to lift weights more and also the inconvenient scheduling times? If you are paying them, then you have every right to request what you want. If they can't accommodate you then either find someone else or choose your own program.
  • cwolfman13cwolfman13 Posts: 36,550Member Member Posts: 36,550Member Member
    I think "need" as whether or not it's worth it is very individual. My wife has a trainer...she doesn't really have any "hard" goals, she just wants to maintain her fitness...she doesn't "need" a trainer for that, but it's worth it to her because her trainer keeps her accountable and works her harder than she would likely work herself. It also gives her an appointment to keep and then she gets her homework. That wouldn't be worth it to me, but it's totally worth it to her.

    I have worked with a couple of different PTs over the years. The first one was a few months after I got started with my weight loss and I wanted to get back into the weight room. It had been awhile so I hired a trainer to give me a program and teach me form. I didn't work with him that long as it didn't take me long to get my form down and just figured I was just as good to run something like Starting Strength. He was a decent trainer, but by no means great, but he served his limited purpose.

    My second trainer was a different story. I started working with him a couple of years after I lost my weight. I had gotten into cycling and was doing some cycling events and was pretty fit, but kind of hit a wall in terms of progress. I also wanted to start actually racing rather than participating in various charity rides. I didn't have any expectation of standing on a podium, but I wanted to be competitive at least, and while I was pretty fit, I wasn't race fit. I also had an interest in getting into Olympic lifting.

    I had a fairly tall order and it was difficult finding a trainer to meet my needs...the standard commercial gym employee wasn't really going to get me where I wanted to go. I ended up pretty much lucking into my guy. He owned his own gym, but lost the lease and started temporarily renting space at a gym I was going to at the time. The first thing I noticed with him is that he had all of his clients doing Olympic lifts as part of their workout. The second thing I noticed was that some of his clients were Joe Schmoes like me...but some were very obviously athletes.

    I started talking with him, and it was the perfect fit. I found out that he was a retired professional BMX racer with multiple national championships and a world championship and that he is one of the team USA BMX coaches and was an avid road rider and racer himself. He really helped me a lot and my fitness went through the roof...as a bonus, I saw better and faster re-comp results than I saw when working on my own. At the time it was definitely worth it. I don't workout with him anymore as I am not racing anymore and it got hard maintaining that level and I just kind of burnt out. I've been considering going back to him though as I've been in a bit of a funk. He's a really good friend of mine (and his wife is my wife's trainer) so I think we'd have no problem working on some goals that aren't racing and a little more tame.

    As with any profession, there are good PTs, decent PTs, outstanding PTs, and downright horrible PTs. Finding the right fit is just as important as anything else.



  • NorthCascadesNorthCascades Posts: 8,951Member Member Posts: 8,951Member Member
    raven56706 wrote: »
    is there a website or good workout builder out there? or maybe even a good workout database that you suggest.

    any comments would be greatly appreciated

    Have you tried Zwift?

    I have a hunch that you might like it. It's made for stationary bikes, some people find it addictive. It's sort of a VR, you can ride in Paris or New Zealand, they have workouts, you can race, etc.

    If your goal is to use exercise to help control your weight, spending time exercising is how you'll achieve that. Paying somebody to craft a plan for you for fitness reasons doesn't sound worth the $ bit motivation does. Some people really love Zwift and then they don't need external motivation because they're having fun.

    I believe your bike can measure power. If it's reasonably accurate (and they should have a max error spec) you know exactly how many calories you're burning on the bike. If it says kJ you're golden, otherwise it's avg w times the number of seconds you were on the bike.

    (Disclosure: I've never used it myself.)
  • stefgreen72stefgreen72 Posts: 46Member Member Posts: 46Member Member
    It sounds like you know what you want so I don’t see a need for a personal trainer unless you need the accountability and expertise that comes with one. I get all my cardio workouts from YouTube. They do the job and the best part is it’s free
  • pjwrtpjwrt Posts: 46Member, Premium Member Posts: 46Member, Premium Member
    Trainers are required for professional athletes, but for us? Not so much. But just like the professionals, fitness programs are tailored to meet your needs and goals.

    That said, Arnold's programs are probably the best and probably will be for a very long time. Search it out and tailor it to your needs. The kicker for most of his programs? Totally free at bodybuilder dot com.
  • Powerclean2deadliftPowerclean2deadlift Posts: 15Member Member Posts: 15Member Member
    pjwrt wrote: »
    Trainers are required for professional athletes, but for us? Not so much. But just like the professionals, fitness programs are tailored to meet your needs and goals.

    I disagree with this... like anything having someone who knows more than you can greatly improve you own efficiency, dedication, ability etc. It just requires you to know what it is you want from that person and knowing when to cut lose. It is also important if you want to learn a technical skills - enter clean... wouldn't advise you learn it from watching a video...
  • pjwrtpjwrt Posts: 46Member, Premium Member Posts: 46Member, Premium Member
    pjwrt wrote: »
    Trainers are required for professional athletes, but for us? Not so much. But just like the professionals, fitness programs are tailored to meet your needs and goals.

    I disagree with this... like anything having someone who knows more than you can greatly improve you own efficiency, dedication, ability etc. It just requires you to know what it is you want from that person and knowing when to cut lose. It is also important if you want to learn a technical skills - enter clean... wouldn't advise you learn it from watching a video...

    pffft....we're talking about middle-aged office workers who failed gym class here. They'd be far more comfortable researching fitness and tailoring what they learned to meet their needs.

    Every single gym in my small county is trainer-centric. Good money standing there telling clueless noobs to jump up and down.
  • COGypsyCOGypsy Posts: 391Member, Premium Member Posts: 391Member, Premium Member
    I think there are a lot of reasons to hire a personal trainer. I personally use one to help me keep my program balanced, to help with form and load management to avoid injury, and to give me that extra little accountability to actually haul myself out of bed at 4 am.

    It sounds from your posts like you have a tendency to let ‘perfect’ be the enemy of good and have a hard time sticking to something long enough to know what results you may be getting. If that impression is correct, having someone prescribe a program and buying enough sessions ahead of time to see the programming through might be what works best for you at this point.
  • cwolfman13cwolfman13 Posts: 36,550Member Member Posts: 36,550Member Member
    pjwrt wrote: »
    pjwrt wrote: »
    Trainers are required for professional athletes, but for us? Not so much. But just like the professionals, fitness programs are tailored to meet your needs and goals.

    I disagree with this... like anything having someone who knows more than you can greatly improve you own efficiency, dedication, ability etc. It just requires you to know what it is you want from that person and knowing when to cut lose. It is also important if you want to learn a technical skills - enter clean... wouldn't advise you learn it from watching a video...

    pffft....we're talking about middle-aged office workers who failed gym class here. They'd be far more comfortable researching fitness and tailoring what they learned to meet their needs.

    Every single gym in my small county is trainer-centric. Good money standing there telling clueless noobs to jump up and down.

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  • Powerclean2deadliftPowerclean2deadlift Posts: 15Member Member Posts: 15Member Member
    pjwrt wrote: »
    pjwrt wrote: »
    Trainers are required for professional athletes, but for us? Not so much. But just like the professionals, fitness programs are tailored to meet your needs and pffft....we're talking about middle-aged office workers who failed gym class here. They'd be far more comfortable researching fitness and tailoring what they learned to meet their needs.

    Every single gym in my small county is trainer-centric. Good money standing there telling clueless noobs to jump up and down.
    ]

    I disagree with this... like anything having someone who knows more than you can greatly improve you own efficiency, dedication, ability etc. It just requires you to know what it is you want from that person and knowing when to cut lose. It is also important if you want to learn a technical skills - enter clean... wouldn't advise you learn it from watching a video...

    Pffft... You might be. I'm not. And even if I was my comment still stands, a PT can be very beneficial to alot of people. Including the general population. Perhaps you assume everyone has a "failed gym class" mentality, like yourself?

    Besides, even if they did fail gym class perhaps they will have more success later on.

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