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Should I follow nurses diet or tdee

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  • virginiajharrisvirginiajharris Posts: 9Member, Premium Member Posts: 9Member, Premium Member
    It could be she misunderstood how MFP is set up or what you were telling her. My nutritionist told me not to eat back my exercise calories. But, that is because she assumed I was eating all my calories and then using exercise to create the deficit. When I pointed out that I was already creating my deficit with my diet and exercise was creating extra deficit, she told met to go ahead and eat them....but maybe not all of them in case I'm overestimating calories burned or underestimating calories consumed.
  • AzdakAzdak Posts: 8,012Member Member Posts: 8,012Member Member
    You could go a little higher but there is there is nothing inherently wrong with that calorie level. Pay attention to your macros and eat 100g protein minimum. If you feel chronically deprived or significantly increase physical activity/exercise, increase it a little.
  • Pricklypineapple422Pricklypineapple422 Posts: 28Member Member Posts: 28Member Member
    NovusDies wrote: »
    Based on your results (which is not enough data yet) your average deficit has been about 625.

    In about 2 more weeks you should be able to tell even better but if you really believe this is creating a larger deficit for you you may need to tighten up your logging. Are you using a food scale to weigh all solid food? Are you using good database entries that you have verified for logging?

    https://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/10634517/you-dont-use-a-food-scale/p1

    https://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/1234699/logging-accurately-step-by-step-guide/p1

    And this isn't even taking into consideration the larger initial weight people lose when starting a diet. OP may very well have her weight loss slow down now as she is probably creating less of a deficit than that. If the first two weeks weren't included it would give a better picture of her current eating deficit.
  • nutmegoreonutmegoreo Posts: 14,477Member Member Posts: 14,477Member Member
    The nurse at my GP has put me on a 1500 cal diet recommended MFP but said don’t eat your exercise calories

    The first 4 weeks I lost 5lb which was perfect.

    I am concerned I am not eating enough calories
    My BMR is 1717 benedict Harris or 1450 Katch McCardle

    I put my activity as lightly active as I am mostly at home and my only exercise atm is walking the dog.
    That gave me a TDEE of 2318 cals

    I have alway believed in eating exercise calories if I eat a 1500 calories diet I will be eating at a deficit of about 800 cals. I am concerned I will not be eating enough to cover my body’s base needs

    My stats are 45
    Height. 5 ft 7in
    Weight. 220lb
    Body fat 50.2%

    Sounds like the 1500 is just about right for you. If you feel that you should be eating more, there is nothing wrong with that, but know that it will slow your weight loss. Logging inaccuracies are very common and will easily slip in unnoticed. I suspect you are probably getting more than 1500 without realizing it. If you are happy with your current rate and how you are doing things right now, then stick with it. If you prefer to eat more, then do that, but expect the weight loss to slow. There's nothing wrong with losing more slowly either.
  • goodasgoldilox165goodasgoldilox165 Posts: 294Member Member Posts: 294Member Member
    It is your weight loss ... do what suits you and what you can sustain.
  • hobbitses333hobbitses333 Posts: 340Member Member Posts: 340Member Member
    I had this same question...I decided eat them back only if I am extra hungry.

    Sometimes I don't have much of an appetite for the rest of the day after the gym and other times I have a big appetite..
  • CahgetsfitCahgetsfit Posts: 1,742Member Member Posts: 1,742Member Member
    I personally prefer the TDEE method because that way I don't have a changing goalpost every day for hitting calories and macros.

    So I work out my TDEE on the online calculator, reduce my calories by 25% and hey presto.

    At least I know exactly how much to eat each day.

    And also, on days that 25% is too big a deficit and i'm still very hungry (not peckish - but actually HUNGRY), then I know I can eat extra.

    For example, if my maintenance is 2000, I eat at 1500. If I'm "starving to death" i'll eat more - like 1700 or 1800. I'm still under my maintenance but I'm no longer starving and the weight still goes down.

    MFP is too confusing with the calories from exercise. The calories burnt are just guesstimates anyway so for me personally, just too fluid for my liking.

    EDIT - Oh and as you lose weight you need to actually re-calculate your TDEE. The lower your weight gets the lower your maintenance gets too, so just remember to adjust it every so often.
    edited August 13
  • LKArghLKArgh Posts: 5,050Member Member Posts: 5,050Member Member
    jayemes wrote: »
    1500 seems low and fairly random. How did they come up with that number?
    Our stats are similar (I'm 5'7" 209 and 46 years old) and MFP has me at 1700 (sedentary) to lose one pound a week.
    I would say unless there was some type of complex reasoning that got them to the 1500 number you'd be correct that you should still eat back exercise calories.
    Try for 2 weeks and see how you feel. You can always add the exercise calories if your energy levels are low or take them away if you're not losing

    UK recommended calories for average female is 2000cals
    The 1500 cals is a 500 cal deficit to give you a lb a week loss

    So, whether you're a 5'0" woman with a desk job who is trying to lose the last few vanity pounds, or a 5'10" woman working construction who needs to lose 60 pounds, the nurse is going to recommend 1500 calories a day, and tell you that if you're training for a marathon you shouldn't eat anything more to fuel those workouts? I think it's clear this advice is not very well thought out.

    Only that most probably underweight or healthy weight women, and athletes do not visit the dr to lose weight, so it is probably safe to assume that this is the recommendation for more or less average height, overweight women at a certain age range. I know it is the same in the hospital near me: they will give diabetic patients guidelines on how many calories and what carbs to eat based on groups (age, BMI, physical activity) etc. This is not fine tuned, but it is still a very good starting point, even if it is 200 calories off. It is safe to assume most people are that off in their logging anyway.
  • greyhoundwalkergreyhoundwalker Posts: 222Member Member Posts: 222Member Member
    It depends on whether you want to closely monitor the numbers or whether you’re happy just getting favourable results. I’m eating 1500 cals and not eating back exercise calories (also in the uk, 1500 was the standard recommendation back in the 1980s when I was a teenager and I’m still following that! ) it’s working fine for me, my exercise levels are the same week to week, and not hugely energetic, if it varied more it might be more helpful to adjust calories to accommodate that. Your rate of loss is fine at the moment, my guess would be if you work out your TDEE and 500 cal deficit, then add back exercise it probably wouldn’t be a great difference. Could be useful data down the line if your weight loss stalls, but your results so far seem spot on.

    TDEE already includes exercise, so you wouldn't add back exercise on top of that.

    MFP uses NEAT not TDEE, so it would come out about the same.

    For example:
    • Using MFP and setting myself to Lightly Active (which accounts for non-exercise steps of around 5000 per my tracker) my calorie goal for 1 pound per week is around 1800 calories, I go rowing twice per week and strength train 1-2 times per week, so my exercise calories would add around 1100 calories per week. Which averaged across 7 days would put my gross calories at 2085.
    • Using TDEECalculator.net and choosing Light Exercise, as strength training doesn't burn a lot of calories, my TDEE comes out about 2650, less 500 calories for 1 pound per week that's gross calories of 2150.

    So not all that much difference. The MFP NEAT can be more beneficial than TDEE if your exercise patterns aren't consistently the same, like mine, if I am training for a race I might be rowing 4-5 times per week and doing more strength training for a couple of weeks, the week before the race I might be just doing some walking to rest.

    Sorry yes you are right, the 500 cals should be subtracted from daily activity (BMR + neat?) before exercise. Brain glitch lol this is why I just stick to my 1500 cals and judge by results!

    Edit for typo
    edited August 13
  • lynn_glenmontlynn_glenmont Posts: 6,662Member Member Posts: 6,662Member Member
    It could be she misunderstood how MFP is set up or what you were telling her. My nutritionist told me not to eat back my exercise calories. But, that is because she assumed I was eating all my calories and then using exercise to create the deficit. When I pointed out that I was already creating my deficit with my diet and exercise was creating extra deficit, she told met to go ahead and eat them....but maybe not all of them in case I'm overestimating calories burned or underestimating calories consumed.

    Given that the nurse recommended that the OP use MFP, doing so without understanding how it works and then advising that the OP not use it as designed borders on professional malpractice.
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