Calorie Counter

You are currently viewing the message boards in:

Maccaroons

cnjg6677cnjg6677 Posts: 133Member Member Posts: 133Member Member
in Recipes
Anyone have good recipes

Replies

  • lynn_glenmontlynn_glenmont Posts: 7,153Member Member Posts: 7,153Member Member
    Do you mean these


    hs16hd7y1zcd.png


    or these?

    3cvxerqlinqe.png


  • NoHookUpZoneNoHookUpZone Posts: 1,571Member, Premium Member Posts: 1,571Member, Premium Member
  • just_Tomekjust_Tomek Posts: 7,262Member Member Posts: 7,262Member Member
  • acpgeeacpgee Posts: 4,126Member Member Posts: 4,126Member Member
    I made some coconut macaroons last weekend, replacing half of the sugar with artificial sweetener. I tried both Splenda and monkfruit and both worked well. Including baking, these took about 15 minutes in total to make.

    2 egg whites
    50 g sugar
    same volume of Splenda or monkfruit sweetener as 50 g sugar
    100 g desicated coconut (for optional stronger flavour, toast first in a dry pan)
    1 tsp vanilla extract (optional, I have done both with and without)
    1 Tbsp flour (optional, I have done both with and without)

    Mix everything together. Drop with a spoon onto trays lined with silicon baing paper. Bake at 160 C for about 10-12 minutes. If you like a neater look, use a piping bag or a ziplock bag with a corner cut off.

    Variation: Use almonds ground finely in the food processor instead of dessicated coconut.

    Here's a picture of mine, served with easy pina colada sorbet. (Blitz together two 400 ml tins of pineapple, one 400 ml tin of coconut cream, 150 ml white rum. If using unsweetened pineapple, sweeten to taste. Freeze overnight. I garnished with slivers of kaffir lime leaf and toasted shredded coconut.)

    rj8lrz7fhu2m.jpeg


  • acpgeeacpgee Posts: 4,126Member Member Posts: 4,126Member Member
    Found a better picture of my macaroons. From another batch that hadn't been blitzed into submission in the food processor.
    keft4hmds6qa.jpeg
  • aokoyeaokoye Posts: 3,122Member Member Posts: 3,122Member Member
    Do you mean these


    hs16hd7y1zcd.png


    or these?

    3cvxerqlinqe.png


    Ah spelling differences in two desserts that are homophones in American English*, that both require a boat load of egg whites, but are vastly different both in ease and taste. And now I want a macaron (or four)

    *or rather, the vast majority of the time I've heard it pronounced in English in the US, the French macaron is pronounced as if it's a homophone to macaroon.
  • BarbaraHelen2013BarbaraHelen2013 Posts: 714Member Member Posts: 714Member Member
    https://www.confessionsofaconfectionista.com/2014/05/tiramisu-macarons.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed:+culinaryxcouture+(Culinary+Couture)

    Tiramisu Macaron, it’s a recipe I’ve made many times and it’s a good successful macaron method, and has never failed to come out perfectly for me.
  • aokoyeaokoye Posts: 3,122Member Member Posts: 3,122Member Member
    This is one of my recipe of choice for macarons: https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/1369639/chocolate-and-raspberry-macaroons
    I typically have trouble with the shells and then I saw an episode of Sorted where they used that. All of the macarons came out despite some serious fumbling so I figured it was pretty foolproof. Needless to say, I've used it with success.
  • lynn_glenmontlynn_glenmont Posts: 7,153Member Member Posts: 7,153Member Member
    aokoye wrote: »
    Do you mean these


    hs16hd7y1zcd.png


    or these?

    3cvxerqlinqe.png


    Ah spelling differences in two desserts that are homophones in American English*, that both require a boat load of egg whites, but are vastly different both in ease and taste. And now I want a macaron (or four)

    *or rather, the vast majority of the time I've heard it pronounced in English in the US, the French macaron is pronounced as if it's a homophone to macaroon.

    Well, since this is text, not speech, I haven't a clue whether OP would pronounce it like macaroon or macaron, which are not homophones for me, although I live in the U.S. And the spelling in the thread title doesn't tell me anything because it doesn't match the spelling I'm familiar with for either of the photos (macaroon for the first, macaron for the second.

    Perhaps if OP ever comes back, we'll get some clarification, or maybe we'll all learn something new, like a maccaroon is something completely different, like a regionally available fruit pronounced Mask Run, and OP wants some jam and ice cream recipes).

    In my original post, I purposely tried to take a way of seeking clarification that did not point to the unusual spelling in the thread title or suggest anyone's pronunciation of it is wrong. Thanks for cooperating.
  • cnjg6677cnjg6677 Posts: 133Member Member Posts: 133Member Member
    Thank you all for the great recipes
  • aokoyeaokoye Posts: 3,122Member Member Posts: 3,122Member Member
    aokoye wrote: »
    Do you mean these


    hs16hd7y1zcd.png


    or these?

    3cvxerqlinqe.png


    Ah spelling differences in two desserts that are homophones in American English*, that both require a boat load of egg whites, but are vastly different both in ease and taste. And now I want a macaron (or four)

    *or rather, the vast majority of the time I've heard it pronounced in English in the US, the French macaron is pronounced as if it's a homophone to macaroon.

    Well, since this is text, not speech, I haven't a clue whether OP would pronounce it like macaroon or macaron, which are not homophones for me, although I live in the U.S. And the spelling in the thread title doesn't tell me anything because it doesn't match the spelling I'm familiar with for either of the photos (macaroon for the first, macaron for the second.

    Perhaps if OP ever comes back, we'll get some clarification, or maybe we'll all learn something new, like a maccaroon is something completely different, like a regionally available fruit pronounced Mask Run, and OP wants some jam and ice cream recipes).

    In my original post, I purposely tried to take a way of seeking clarification that did not point to the unusual spelling in the thread title or suggest anyone's pronunciation of it is wrong. Thanks for cooperating.

    This is one of those times when communication online breaks down. I see you assumed the worst (thanks for cooperating...?). I am well aware that there was an abundance of ambiguity in the title given the spelling and was assuming that that's why you provided pictures for macarons and macaroons. I also in fact mentioned that the two words aren't homophones for all speakers of American English (which is really just a broad heading for a bunch of dialects). I also, however, know that the spelling (and pronunciation) differences for the two cookies are mixed up on a regular basis. Here's an example from a recipe on Dr. Oetker's British website (I know, not the US) that took a sheer lack of time to find. That isn't an indication of my ability to look for things on Google, so much as it's a sign that this isn't uncommon.

    There wasn't any judgment, negative or positive, from me. Just musing about the phonology and the spelling of the two words.

    But again, "thanks" for assuming the worst instead of asking for clarification.
  • lynn_glenmontlynn_glenmont Posts: 7,153Member Member Posts: 7,153Member Member
    aokoye wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    Do you mean these


    hs16hd7y1zcd.png


    or these?

    3cvxerqlinqe.png


    Ah spelling differences in two desserts that are homophones in American English*, that both require a boat load of egg whites, but are vastly different both in ease and taste. And now I want a macaron (or four)

    *or rather, the vast majority of the time I've heard it pronounced in English in the US, the French macaron is pronounced as if it's a homophone to macaroon.

    Well, since this is text, not speech, I haven't a clue whether OP would pronounce it like macaroon or macaron, which are not homophones for me, although I live in the U.S. And the spelling in the thread title doesn't tell me anything because it doesn't match the spelling I'm familiar with for either of the photos (macaroon for the first, macaron for the second.

    Perhaps if OP ever comes back, we'll get some clarification, or maybe we'll all learn something new, like a maccaroon is something completely different, like a regionally available fruit pronounced Mask Run, and OP wants some jam and ice cream recipes).

    In my original post, I purposely tried to take a way of seeking clarification that did not point to the unusual spelling in the thread title or suggest anyone's pronunciation of it is wrong. Thanks for cooperating.

    This is one of those times when communication online breaks down. I see you assumed the worst (thanks for cooperating...?). I am well aware that there was an abundance of ambiguity in the title given the spelling and was assuming that that's why you provided pictures for macarons and macaroons. I also in fact mentioned that the two words aren't homophones for all speakers of American English (which is really just a broad heading for a bunch of dialects). I also, however, know that the spelling (and pronunciation) differences for the two cookies are mixed up on a regular basis. Here's an example from a recipe on Dr. Oetker's British website (I know, not the US) that took a sheer lack of time to find. That isn't an indication of my ability to look for things on Google, so much as it's a sign that this isn't uncommon.

    There wasn't any judgment, negative or positive, from me. Just musing about the phonology and the spelling of the two words.

    But again, "thanks" for assuming the worst instead of asking for clarification.

    Yes, communication has broken down. My response wasn't premised on an assumption that you intended your first post as a judgment but on the unnecessary raising of issues I had avoided to stay clear of the MFP rule against commenting on posters' spelling and grammar and, more importantly, to support the underlying spirit of that rule. The last sentence of my previous post reflects annoyance at feeling like I had been made complicit by your quoting of me in exactly the type of violation I was trying to avoid by just posting pictures and asking which was intended.

    Sadly, despite OP's reappearance, it seems we're not to find out which recipe was wanted.
  • aokoyeaokoye Posts: 3,122Member Member Posts: 3,122Member Member
    aokoye wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    Do you mean these


    hs16hd7y1zcd.png


    or these?

    3cvxerqlinqe.png


    Ah spelling differences in two desserts that are homophones in American English*, that both require a boat load of egg whites, but are vastly different both in ease and taste. And now I want a macaron (or four)

    *or rather, the vast majority of the time I've heard it pronounced in English in the US, the French macaron is pronounced as if it's a homophone to macaroon.

    Well, since this is text, not speech, I haven't a clue whether OP would pronounce it like macaroon or macaron, which are not homophones for me, although I live in the U.S. And the spelling in the thread title doesn't tell me anything because it doesn't match the spelling I'm familiar with for either of the photos (macaroon for the first, macaron for the second.

    Perhaps if OP ever comes back, we'll get some clarification, or maybe we'll all learn something new, like a maccaroon is something completely different, like a regionally available fruit pronounced Mask Run, and OP wants some jam and ice cream recipes).

    In my original post, I purposely tried to take a way of seeking clarification that did not point to the unusual spelling in the thread title or suggest anyone's pronunciation of it is wrong. Thanks for cooperating.

    This is one of those times when communication online breaks down. I see you assumed the worst (thanks for cooperating...?). I am well aware that there was an abundance of ambiguity in the title given the spelling and was assuming that that's why you provided pictures for macarons and macaroons. I also in fact mentioned that the two words aren't homophones for all speakers of American English (which is really just a broad heading for a bunch of dialects). I also, however, know that the spelling (and pronunciation) differences for the two cookies are mixed up on a regular basis. Here's an example from a recipe on Dr. Oetker's British website (I know, not the US) that took a sheer lack of time to find. That isn't an indication of my ability to look for things on Google, so much as it's a sign that this isn't uncommon.

    There wasn't any judgment, negative or positive, from me. Just musing about the phonology and the spelling of the two words.

    But again, "thanks" for assuming the worst instead of asking for clarification.

    Yes, communication has broken down. My response wasn't premised on an assumption that you intended your first post as a judgment but on the unnecessary raising of issues I had avoided to stay clear of the MFP rule against commenting on posters' spelling and grammar and, more importantly, to support the underlying spirit of that rule. The last sentence of my previous post reflects annoyance at feeling like I had been made complicit by your quoting of me in exactly the type of violation I was trying to avoid by just posting pictures and asking which was intended.

    Sadly, despite OP's reappearance, it seems we're not to find out which recipe was wanted.

    At this point (and really before you had even initially replied to my first post) I don't know that it really matters which recipe was wanted given that both were provided over the course of multiple posts. Unless there's some entirely different recipe that they're looking for (which is doubtful). Given that a macaron and a macaroon are two very pretty different foods, I would argue that spelling, as a means of distinguishing the two foods, actually does matter. This would be mildly amusing if you knew me as I don't actually put a lot of stock or importance in spelling for a lot of reasons unrelated to this. You would be hard pressed to call what I wrote a "attack against the member’s spelling" (MFP's wording, not your's).

    Again, my post wasn't picking apart or analyzing the OP's spelling (nor yours), rather the spelling of the two cookies more broadly. It's akin to people discussing biscuits vs cookies. It doesn't, however, seem that that was transparent to you. In the same vein, your last sentence came across as awfully snarky which, if we're talking about rule following, isn't in the spirit of the community guidelines. If it wasn't snarky, then that wasn't at all transparent to me.

    In short, it sounds like, you read a lot into my post and most if not all of what you read into it wasn't actually there. That includes any thought or discussion over the title of the thread.
    edited September 18
  • _Miss_Chievous_Miss_Chievous Posts: 601Member Member Posts: 601Member Member
    Love macaroons ❤
  • ClairinClairin Posts: 77Member Member Posts: 77Member Member
    Isn't one a Coconut macaroon?
  • girlwithcurls2girlwithcurls2 Posts: 1,809Member Member Posts: 1,809Member Member
    @acpgee, what in the world were you preparing those for? Both look incredible! Holy smokes. This was total clickbait for me! Whatever OP meant, I'm now putting both on my To Do list! :love:
  • acpgeeacpgee Posts: 4,126Member Member Posts: 4,126Member Member
    @acpgee, what in the world were you preparing those for? Both look incredible! Holy smokes. This was total clickbait for me! Whatever OP meant, I'm now putting both on my To Do list! :love:

    I made a batch of coconut macaroons for a dinner party a few weekends ago when I was also serving the easy pina colada sorbet. I make either almond or coconut macaroons when I have leftover egg whites. If you don't want to deal with your leftover egg whites right away you can pop them into the freezer. Macaroons are very quick and easy. About 15 minutes including the 10 minutes in the oven. A fun show off way to bake something real time during a dinner party if you serve a main that generates leftover egg whites (ie spaghetti carbonara or hollandaise sauce for me).
Sign In or Register to comment.