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Politely saying No Thank You...

kksmom1789kksmom1789 Posts: 279Member Member Posts: 279Member Member
Pay no mind to my grammar or run on sentences I type like I speak
So my problem is this and I wanna know if I’m in the same boat here but I have a hard time turning down free food it’s especially hard for me working in a small office setting they will know if I lie and say I ate some...also my hubby and I have the same lunch hour and he always ask me to go to lunch with him which I love to spend some time with him but I don’t really care for the fast food... I don’t wanna be mean and say no because he will say order something healthy like a salad but I literally can’t stop ordering those cheeseburgers (or anything else for me that’s unhealthy)
Any suggestions??
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Replies

  • neugebauer52neugebauer52 Posts: 917Member Member Posts: 917Member Member
    denjan333 wrote: »
    Only you can control what you eat. Why are you letting everyone else have that power?

    First thing in the morning and your answer hits me: BRILLIANT! But seriously - sometimes "politely" is a waste of time. Everyone wants to know better and wants "to help". "I am under doctor's orders" or "I have to check with my weight loss buddy first" can help. I usually take something to eat with me - like a good salad and my own salad dressing. Hospitals use a label "NIL BY MOUTH" which they stick onto your bed before you are operated on. Maybe that would help?
    edited October 9
  • goldthistimegoldthistime Posts: 3,196Member Member Posts: 3,196Member Member
    I LOVE McDonald's and Wendy's salads with grilled chicken. Maybe it's just a matter of habit? If you can convince yourself to switch to those a few times, you might start preferring a salad to a cheeseburger (as I do). With respect to @LoPotion 's comments, I have on occasion, fit in something like a cheeseburger and small fries, but for me, it takes some unusual circumstances to make it work comfortably. Like heavy exercise that day, or tons of veggies sandwiched around that meal. Otherwise it takes too much willpower for me. My chances of eating high calorie low nutrient foods after that meal go up considerably.

    As to the free food, there was someone here who said they imagined that the food had been contaminated (sneezed on, or something like that) and that helped her stay away. I think I unconsciously do that in Costco. I am bewildered by all the people buzzing around from one sampling station to the next.
  • missysippy930missysippy930 Posts: 1,438Member Member Posts: 1,438Member Member
    I worked in a small office also, before I retired. There was always food being brought in by either customers or coworkers. Many times, multiple things in a day. Often it was put on the counter in front of my desk. I had to learn to resist the temptation.

    Making better choices isn’t always easy. Priorities have to be made. What do you want most, the temporary satisfaction of something tasty, or do you want to lose weight and become healthier?

    Choices.
  • LoPotionLoPotion Posts: 26Member Member Posts: 26Member Member
    I LOVE McDonald's and Wendy's salads with grilled chicken. Maybe it's just a matter of habit? If you can convince yourself to switch to those a few times, you might start preferring a salad to a cheeseburger (as I do). With respect to @LoPotion 's comments, I have on occasion, fit in something like a cheeseburger and small fries, but for me, it takes some unusual circumstances to make it work comfortably. Like heavy exercise that day, or tons of veggies sandwiched around that meal. Otherwise it takes too much willpower for me. My chances of eating high calorie low nutrient foods after that meal go up considerably.

    You bring up some good points! I will always vouch for homemade/packed lunches, first and foremost. I'm just sayin', it doesn't have to be all or nothing. I don't know how accurate their nutrition info is, but the Wendy's website puts a junior cheeseburger and value fries at 500-600 calories. I think that's reasonable for an entire meal, once or twice a week. And while it can lead someone to making bad choices for the rest of the day, it can also have the opposite effect by satisfying a craving before someone goes on a binge.

    Just my two cents! But you're right about those salads - they sure are delicious.
  • sytchequeensytchequeen Posts: 515Member Member Posts: 515Member Member
    tauntonmom wrote: »
    You say don’t really care for the fast food.

    Newsflash: you literally can stop ordering those cheeseburgers (or anything else that’s unhealthy). You have the power. Use it.

    Spend the lunchtime with your husband but bring the food you choose to eat.

    Literally what I came here to say! Why eat anything you don't care for?
  • goldthistimegoldthistime Posts: 3,196Member Member Posts: 3,196Member Member
    LoPotion wrote: »
    I LOVE McDonald's and Wendy's salads with grilled chicken. Maybe it's just a matter of habit? If you can convince yourself to switch to those a few times, you might start preferring a salad to a cheeseburger (as I do). With respect to @LoPotion 's comments, I have on occasion, fit in something like a cheeseburger and small fries, but for me, it takes some unusual circumstances to make it work comfortably. Like heavy exercise that day, or tons of veggies sandwiched around that meal. Otherwise it takes too much willpower for me. My chances of eating high calorie low nutrient foods after that meal go up considerably.

    You bring up some good points! I will always vouch for homemade/packed lunches, first and foremost. I'm just sayin', it doesn't have to be all or nothing. I don't know how accurate their nutrition info is, but the Wendy's website puts a junior cheeseburger and value fries at 500-600 calories. I think that's reasonable for an entire meal, once or twice a week. And while it can lead someone to making bad choices for the rest of the day, it can also have the opposite effect by satisfying a craving before someone goes on a binge.

    Just my two cents! But you're right about those salads - they sure are delicious.

    Calories are absolutely king, and I think the majority here agrees that satisfying cravings staves off binges. You gave solid advice, I didn’t mean to infer otherwise.

    Why, after all this time, I have to be so careful of carby or treat foods, I don’t know. It is what it is.
  • LoPotionLoPotion Posts: 26Member Member Posts: 26Member Member
    LoPotion wrote: »
    I LOVE McDonald's and Wendy's salads with grilled chicken. Maybe it's just a matter of habit? If you can convince yourself to switch to those a few times, you might start preferring a salad to a cheeseburger (as I do). With respect to @LoPotion 's comments, I have on occasion, fit in something like a cheeseburger and small fries, but for me, it takes some unusual circumstances to make it work comfortably. Like heavy exercise that day, or tons of veggies sandwiched around that meal. Otherwise it takes too much willpower for me. My chances of eating high calorie low nutrient foods after that meal go up considerably.

    You bring up some good points! I will always vouch for homemade/packed lunches, first and foremost. I'm just sayin', it doesn't have to be all or nothing. I don't know how accurate their nutrition info is, but the Wendy's website puts a junior cheeseburger and value fries at 500-600 calories. I think that's reasonable for an entire meal, once or twice a week. And while it can lead someone to making bad choices for the rest of the day, it can also have the opposite effect by satisfying a craving before someone goes on a binge.

    Just my two cents! But you're right about those salads - they sure are delicious.

    Calories are absolutely king, and I think the majority here agrees that satisfying cravings staves off binges. You gave solid advice, I didn’t mean to infer otherwise.

    Why, after all this time, I have to be so careful of carby or treat foods, I don’t know. It is what it is.

    Hey, no worries! I'm always happy to talk about this sort of thing and hear other points of view. Everyone has their own set of rules to adhere to. You're doing great!
  • cheryldumaischeryldumais Posts: 1,777Member Member Posts: 1,777Member Member
    I have stopped eating treats at work. They now know that I don't indulge. Once you get that established you won't have so many offers and people stop questioning you. As for the lunch with hubby... I would just pack a lunch for myself and join him for the company. Start out by packing something you really like and as time goes by the burgers won't seem so tempting. The first couple of months on a new diet are tough because everything is changing and you really have nothing to mess up. When you start losing the thought of gaining it back might be more incentive than you would think. For me as the weight started coming off I found the thrill of seeing a lower weight on the scale kept me honest. As they say Losing weight is hard, being overweight is hard, pick your hard.
  • kristen8000kristen8000 Posts: 601Member Member Posts: 601Member Member
    Saying no is an acquired skill that you need to work on.

    I decided and told everyone that's important in my life that I'd be concentrating on a weight loss goal from Sept. 3rd until Dec. 14th this year. Which means less eating out, less skipping work outs, less social stuff and saying NO a lot more. And honestly, everyone understands. It's a lot like having a project you are passionate about a work and to get it done you have to work over time. We do what we have to do to get the job done. Weight loss is no different.

    Now, the eating out the hubby. I have the same situation and tend to tell him no a lot. But he knows it won't be forever. But he knows that this is important to me. We spend time doing other things like taking walks in the evening. Social time doesn't always have to be "what are we eating"...
  • slbbwslbbw Posts: 266Member Member Posts: 266Member Member
    The treats table at work and lunch with Hubby are two separate beasts. Changing your diet should not necessarily cause you to have to overhaul your social life. I gave up all sugar for about 6 months before I was able to slowly reintroduc treats in small prtions. The treat table at work is mostly avoided. But the other day, I had worked out, had the calorie budget for it and decided that a piece of apple cake sounded really quite tasy. It was and I regret nothing.

    As for lunch, why don't you pick the place where you eat instead of letting your husband decide. Start with a salad only place. Or as other have said pre view the menu. Often time fast food will lettuce wrap your burger. It save almost 200 calories and you still get to indulge. It about having a new game plan, not forcing yourself to willpower through every potential interaction with food.
  • Chef_BarbellChef_Barbell Posts: 5,215Member, Premium Member Posts: 5,215Member, Premium Member
    maybe1pe wrote: »
    I just say no... simply "No." No explanation, not excuses, I don't say I just ate. I just say no. Maybe "No thanks" if I'm feeling polite but no one needs an explanation as to why you're saying no.

    You control what you eat. Period. Don't want a cheeseburger? Don't get one.

    On the rare occasion the food is something I want. I take a small amount, say thank you. and walk away. I log it and maybe adjust a little, but usually not.

    Saying "No" really is a skill. A few years ago I got divorced and after that relationship I realized that unintentionally I was always saying "Yes" to things I didn't really want to do or want to eat or want for whatever reason because I was trying to please someone else. From that moment forward I promised myself that I would say no to anything that didn't align with my morals or beliefs or feelings or just because it was something I didn't want and that no one needed an explanation for why I was saying no. Saying no has honestly empowered me and once you start it will make a difference in other areas of your life as well.

    This for me also... you don't owe anyone an explanation for not eating something.
  • NovusDiesNovusDies Posts: 5,334Member, Premium Member Posts: 5,334Member, Premium Member
    It is not free. It costs calories. Calories for which you have a limited supply just like money. Many people, myself included, treat calories like money. I have a budget and I mostly stick to it. If I want to make a doughnut or a cheeseburger fit I will make it happen. If I do not feel like trying to make it fit or I am not that interested in eating it I will not waste my calories on it.

    There are some social situations like a big family meal where I might eat things I don't love to be part of the group but those happen really rarely and I still choose.

    One of the reasons I gained weight was because I was not enough of a "picky eater." I would eat high calorie foods that I didn't really love just because I was hungry and needed something fast. I am much pickier now.
  • seltzermint555seltzermint555 Posts: 9,720Member Member Posts: 9,720Member Member
    When it comes to workplace freebies, potluck, special occasions, holidays with family, etc...I usually use the "trick" of being really vocal about 1 particular thing I enjoy and it keeps people off my back. For example, I like my mom's peanut butter fudge and I make a big deal about it. No one really notices that I didn't even try the sugar cookies, cake, or green bean casserole...they know I'm all about the fudge. Silly example but it really works. At work, they know I don't care about most treats but if there are donuts from 1 particular place I love, I'll always have one. I know this is kind of a roundabout "solution" but I have had good luck with it.

    Honestly, some people really only seem to give you a hard time if you take the "I'm eating healthy, I won't eat anything x, y or z" path. It's like a challenge to them, I guess.
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