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Gaining Muscle

Smesmond27Smesmond27 Posts: 4Member, Premium Member Posts: 4Member, Premium Member
What is the best advice for building lean muscle mass? I’ve lost a lot of fat weight over the past couple of years, but I’m really struggling to put on muscle mass and definition. I’m an 18yr old 5’10 female, weighing about 135lbs. I’ve talked to a nutritionist, and trainers about this, and nothing has worked so far. I’m also Majoring in Exercise and Fitness Science, and have yet to learn about what would help ME. Thanks!
edited November 18

Replies

  • 11Templars11Templars Posts: 362Member Member Posts: 362Member Member
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Follow a proven lifting program with progressive overload while eating sufficient protein.

    Pretty much what this gentleman said: Try out this 5x5 routine. It's a great program.

    https://stronglifts.com/5x5/#gref

    Try that out for 12 weeks, eat at least 100gm of protein a day, and after your first two weeks of going slow to get used to your program push yourself, push yourself, push yourself!

    Speaking from experience, consistency is the key. You can't do something half assed and expect good results. You'll have to put in the work, but, I promise, you put in the work, keep the diet clean, and track your protein levels, you'll get results. Remember, this is about the long game. Rome wasn't built in a day.

    I'm happy to help in any way I can...

    Blessings,
  • quiksylver296quiksylver296 Posts: 25,796Member Member Posts: 25,796Member Member
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Follow a proven lifting program with progressive overload while eating sufficient protein.
    sardelsa wrote: »
    Overall, you want to go slow and steady, so a 0.5lb or less per week gain (250 cals over maintenance daily) is good. Also make sure you are follow a progressive lifting program (something proven, balanced and has you progressing over time). Get adequate protein too, 0.8-1g per lb bodyweight.

    If you want more detailed info, these stickies are very helpful

    https://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/10300326/most-helpful-posts-goal-gaining-weight-must-reads#latest
    11Templars wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Follow a proven lifting program with progressive overload while eating sufficient protein.

    Pretty much what this gentleman said: Try out this 5x5 routine. It's a great program.

    https://stronglifts.com/5x5/#gref

    Try that out for 12 weeks, eat at least 100gm of protein a day, and after your first two weeks of going slow to get used to your program push yourself, push yourself, push yourself!

    Speaking from experience, consistency is the key. You can't do something half assed and expect good results. You'll have to put in the work, but, I promise, you put in the work, keep the diet clean, and track your protein levels, you'll get results. Remember, this is about the long game. Rome wasn't built in a day.

    I'm happy to help in any way I can...

    Blessings,

    All of this.
  • erickirberickirb Posts: 12,368Member Member Posts: 12,368Member Member
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Follow a proven lifting program with progressive overload while eating sufficient protein.

    This, but also a caloric surplus
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Posts: 8,036Member Member Posts: 8,036Member Member
    Best advice?

    Get a well experienced trainer(not a commercial gym "trainer)that has a proven track record.

    Eat a reasonably balanced diet in a slight surplus.

    Be dedicated and consistent and think long term.

    This will give you near optimal results.
    edited November 19
  • erickirberickirb Posts: 12,368Member Member Posts: 12,368Member Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    Best advice?

    Get a well experienced trainer(not a commercial gym "trainer)that has a proven track record.

    Eat a reasonably balanced diet in a slight surplus.

    Be dedicated and consistent and think long term.

    This will give you near optimal results.

    A trainer can help, esp if lacking motivation... but if you are self-motivated there are a lot of good programs out there that you can hit that won't require a trainer unless you are new to the lifts and want form advice.

    The biggest factor will be dedication and consistency while in a surplus, if you don't get those down, then nothing else will help.
    edited November 20
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Posts: 8,036Member Member Posts: 8,036Member Member
    erickirb wrote: »
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    Best advice?

    Get a well experienced trainer(not a commercial gym "trainer)that has a proven track record.

    Eat a reasonably balanced diet in a slight surplus.

    Be dedicated and consistent and think long term.

    This will give you near optimal results.

    A trainer can help, esp if lacking motivation... but if you are self-motivated there are a lot of good programs out there that you can hit that won't require a trainer unless you are new to the lifts and want form advice.

    The biggest factor will be dedication and consistency while in a surplus, if you don't get those down, then nothing else will help.
    The majority of programs are not optimal. The question is what was the best advice for hypertrophy. I rather have a higher ROI than go the cheaper route.

    A experienced trainer who program templates tailored to a individual would be more optimal than any cookie cutter program. Anybody worth salt who writes programs will have better results customizing their template to a individual than just running a template without any of the nuances of the individual taken to account for a template.

    I'd also argue the more novel you are to training the less important is the program itself.

    Example Strarting strength program according to the site only 2% of the people who log wprkouts on the site actually run the program as written. You know how many get stronger? 100% because they are novel. So is starting strength that good of a template or is it just train and stay dedicated the key? Dedication for novel and more advanced programming as we progress.

    We are talking best advice for hypertrophy though and without knowing the train history of a individual my default wouldn't be try a program out there as my best advice.
    edited November 20
  • 11Templars11Templars Posts: 362Member Member Posts: 362Member Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    erickirb wrote: »
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    Best advice?

    Get a well experienced trainer(not a commercial gym "trainer)that has a proven track record.

    Eat a reasonably balanced diet in a slight surplus.

    Be dedicated and consistent and think long term.

    This will give you near optimal results.

    A trainer can help, esp if lacking motivation... but if you are self-motivated there are a lot of good programs out there that you can hit that won't require a trainer unless you are new to the lifts and want form advice.

    The biggest factor will be dedication and consistency while in a surplus, if you don't get those down, then nothing else will help.
    The majority of programs are not optimal. The question is what was the best advice for hypertrophy. I rather have a higher ROI than go the cheaper route.

    A experienced trainer who program templates tailored to a individual would be more optimal than any cookie cutter program. Anybody worth salt who writes programs will have better results customizing their template to a individual than just running a template without any of the nuances of the individual taken to account for a template.

    I'd also argue the more novel you are to training the less important is the program itself.

    Example Strarting strength program according to the site only 2% of the people who log wprkouts on the site actually run the program as written. You know how many get stronger? 100% because they are novel. So is starting strength that good of a template or is it just train and stay dedicated the key? Dedication for novel and more advanced programming as we progress.

    We are talking best advice for hypertrophy though and without knowing the train history of a individual my default wouldn't be try a program out there as my best advice.

    Agreed, for the most part...

    A personal trainer is optimal. However, many folks find the cost prohibitive.

    What I haven't heard from the OP is what he is doing in terms of lifting, nor have I heard about how long they've been at this?

    Oh to be a new lifter again....

    Great to see such great advice being offered here....
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