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Always feeling hungry and rapid weight gain

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  • natasor1natasor1 Posts: 127Member Member Posts: 127Member Member
    This is site where people try to help each other to lose weight and feel great, isn't it? the calory counting is only a tool to reach that goal
    The food diary and count calories is all rite, just why is so meticulous? I understand if you know the range where you are, say 1200 or 2500. This important to know. But every day count 1200 or 1300 and make big deal of it. It's too much
  • natasor1natasor1 Posts: 127Member Member Posts: 127Member Member
    I read many success stories, but never seen women got to their dream body. They always short of the dream weight about 10-15 lbs. I think this is a good indicator that 120 lbs goal is not achievable on 1500 cal a day for woman even doing exercises
  • Muscleflex79Muscleflex79 Posts: 1,834Member Member Posts: 1,834Member Member
    natasor1 wrote: »
    I read many success stories, but never seen women got to their dream body. They always short of the dream weight about 10-15 lbs. I think this is a good indicator that 120 lbs goal is not achievable on 1500 cal a day for woman even doing exercises

    ok, ill bite - so what then is the answer??
  • natasor1natasor1 Posts: 127Member Member Posts: 127Member Member
    Eat one day and stop eating the next
  • natasor1natasor1 Posts: 127Member Member Posts: 127Member Member
    Oh, I remember to asked my 5-years old grand daughter what I have to do to loose weight? And she answered just don't eat
  • corinasue1143corinasue1143 Posts: 2,681Member Member Posts: 2,681Member Member
    UVAPhan wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    UVAPhan wrote: »
    PAV8888 wrote: »
    I wonder if you have adjusted your calories lower now that you have lost? The less you weigh the less you burn ...

    He has already stated that he is NOT ONLY eating below the calories MFP suggests but is trying to eat below the 1500 Calories minimum for a male. Adjusting MFP goals lower will accomplish?!?!?

    I was under the impression the minimum for a male was 1,200, that's why I assumed 1,500 would be sufficient to sustain me and still give me an additional amount toward my deficit.

    As other posters have said, the minimum for males on MFP is 1500 - and that is only for very very short & sedentary males. You're not short.

    Have a read of this, and substitute 'man' for 'woman' and '1500' for '1200': https://www.aworkoutroutine.com/1200-calorie-diet/


    So knowing that now, I've been doing this all wrong for 3.5 months. I lost a ton of my 43 pounds in the first 2.5 months and now my weight has stalled. Do you think eating too few calories could have had something to do with that?

    Everything!

  • corinasue1143corinasue1143 Posts: 2,681Member Member Posts: 2,681Member Member
    natasor1 wrote: »
    Why do you guys count your calorie so meticulous? It"s not natural way to interact with food. In long thousands years of human history we never count calories and still we ( as a whole community) survived all kind of conditions: temperature decrease and increase, floods, lack of food, physical endurance. If you overeat one day, why not to abstain of food the next day?.... You always will be in balance with yourself and food caloric load. Don"t think that your body stupid. Your body is much smarter then any of smartest doctors or dietitians. It knows exactly how to regulate it's own nourishment.

    In history, what was man’s life expectancy? What is it now? Somebody got smart in between.
  • natasor1natasor1 Posts: 127Member Member Posts: 127Member Member
    Yong kids have very natural way to regulate their food intake. They close to natural choice of food or menu. Their taste is not spoiled by societal customs to eat, to spend time at the table, to celebrate, to indulge Yes, my granddaughter can skip breakfast or lunch or all together
  • RiderOfWesternRiderOfWestern Posts: 7,849Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter MFP Moderator Posts: 7,849Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter MFP Moderator
    natasor1 wrote: »
    Yong kids have very natural way to regulate their food intake. They close to natural choice of food or menu. Their taste is not spoiled by societal customs to eat, to spend time at the table, to celebrate, to indulge Yes, my granddaughter can skip breakfast or lunch or all together
    I work with young kids and have for years. Not with one child, many. At no point have I ever encountered a child who will simply decide to skip a meal out of a desired to not eat. I have encountered children who will, out of anger or upset or other strong emotions, refuse to lunch at the appointed time (say, if lunch is at 11 or 11:30) but every time this happens, they want lunch when they calm down; they never make it to the end of even the school day while continuing to turn down lunch. We never make them eat lunch and if they wanted to go the day without eating lunch, they could. The only kids who have ever made it the day without eating are the ones who do so for religious purposes*, not because their bodies have told them to.

    If you, who advocate for intermittent fasting, have a 5-year-old who is skipping meals, you should think about why that might be happening.

    edit: *And all of these children, although young, were older than 5.

    I used to "skip meals" all the time as a child. If I am not hungry, I won't eat.
    I also hated eating at school and simply wouldn't. So, I just had a breakfast and a dinner.

    My daughter (high school) has a crazy school schedule that changes daily and her lunch schedule changes along with that and some days her lunch is too early for her and so she just doesn't eat at school those days because she isn't hungry at that time.
  • PrismaticPhoenixPrismaticPhoenix Posts: 34Member Member Posts: 34Member Member
    natasor1 wrote: »
    Yong kids have very natural way to regulate their food intake. They close to natural choice of food or menu. Their taste is not spoiled by societal customs to eat, to spend time at the table, to celebrate, to indulge Yes, my granddaughter can skip breakfast or lunch or all together
    I work with young kids and have for years. Not with one child, many. At no point have I ever encountered a child who will simply decide to skip a meal out of a desired to not eat. I have encountered children who will, out of anger or upset or other strong emotions, refuse to lunch at the appointed time (say, if lunch is at 11 or 11:30) but every time this happens, they want lunch when they calm down; they never make it to the end of even the school day while continuing to turn down lunch. We never make them eat lunch and if they wanted to go the day without eating lunch, they could. The only kids who have ever made it the day without eating are the ones who do so for religious purposes*, not because their bodies have told them to.

    If you, who advocate for intermittent fasting, have a 5-year-old who is skipping meals, you should think about why that might be happening.

    edit: *And all of these children, although young, were older than 5.

    I used to "skip meals" all the time as a child. If I am not hungry, I won't eat.
    I also hated eating at school and simply wouldn't. So, I just had a breakfast and a dinner.

    My daughter (high school) has a crazy school schedule that changes daily and her lunch schedule changes along with that and some days her lunch is too early for her and so she just doesn't eat at school those days because she isn't hungry at that time.
    High school is different than 5-years-old. "They offer lunch too early" is different than "I don't get hungry the whole day."

    Are you telling me that at 5-years-old you went to school a full day and didn't eat the entire time because you weren't hungry? Because "I didn't eat because I didn't like eating at school" is, once again, a different motivator.

    As I said, I've never encountered a 5-year-old who just "didn't get hungry" for that kind of period.

    edit - And I want to be clear: I absolutely believe that there are things that can cause children of all ages to refuse food even if they are hungry. I think we've all heard the stories of kids not wanting to eat what was cooked at dinner, parents saying, "You can't leave the table until you eat it," and the kids falling asleep in the food. Kids absolutely can and do refuse food for a variety of reasons even for significant periods. But kids simply not getting hungry for the entire school day? I've never seen that. If a child is refusing food for that kind of period, I would want to know what was going on. Is (as is happening with your daughter) lunch too early? Is there a problem with the food? Is there a problem with the eating environment?
    edited November 29
  • psychod787psychod787 Posts: 2,823Member, Premium Member Posts: 2,823Member, Premium Member
    natasor1 wrote: »
    Yong kids have very natural way to regulate their food intake. They close to natural choice of food or menu. Their taste is not spoiled by societal customs to eat, to spend time at the table, to celebrate, to indulge Yes, my granddaughter can skip breakfast or lunch or all together
    I work with young kids and have for years. Not with one child, many. At no point have I ever encountered a child who will simply decide to skip a meal out of a desired to not eat. I have encountered children who will, out of anger or upset or other strong emotions, refuse to lunch at the appointed time (say, if lunch is at 11 or 11:30) but every time this happens, they want lunch when they calm down; they never make it to the end of even the school day while continuing to turn down lunch. We never make them eat lunch and if they wanted to go the day without eating lunch, they could. The only kids who have ever made it the day without eating are the ones who do so for religious purposes*, not because their bodies have told them to.

    If you, who advocate for intermittent fasting, have a 5-year-old who is skipping meals, you should think about why that might be happening.

    edit: *And all of these children, although young, were older than 5.

    I used to "skip meals" all the time as a child. If I am not hungry, I won't eat.
    I also hated eating at school and simply wouldn't. So, I just had a breakfast and a dinner.

    My daughter (high school) has a crazy school schedule that changes daily and her lunch schedule changes along with that and some days her lunch is too early for her and so she just doesn't eat at school those days because she isn't hungry at that time.
    High school is different than 5-years-old. "They offer lunch too early" is different than "I don't get hungry the whole day."

    Are you telling me that at 5-years-old you went to school a full day and didn't eat the entire time because you weren't hungry? Because "I didn't eat because I didn't like eating at school" is, once again, a different motivator.

    As I said, I've never encountered a 5-year-old who just "didn't get hungry" for that kind of period.

    edit - And I want to be clear: I absolutely believe that there are things that can cause children of all ages to refuse food even if they are hungry. I think we've all heard the stories of kids not wanting to eat what was cooked at dinner, parents saying, "You can't leave the table until you eat it," and the kids falling asleep in the food. Kids absolutely can and do refuse food for a variety of reasons even for significant periods. But kids simply not getting hungry for the entire school day? I've never seen that. If a child is refusing food for that kind of period, I would want to know what was going on. Is (as is happening with your daughter) lunch too early? Is there a problem with the food? Is there a problem with the eating environment?

    If we look back to the dawn of the 20th century, obesity and overweight were the exception. Now in the 21st, it's the norm. Have we changed? Humans are adaptable creatures, but not that rapid. The environment has changes radically. Jobs are less physical. More cases of 2 parent working households or single parent homes. The food landscape has dramatically changed. Humans do have a built in satiety control system. Though many of the foods we eat today high Jack them. Unfortunately, we are monkeys living in a space environment.
  • PrismaticPhoenixPrismaticPhoenix Posts: 34Member Member Posts: 34Member Member
    psychod787 wrote: »
    natasor1 wrote: »
    Yong kids have very natural way to regulate their food intake. They close to natural choice of food or menu. Their taste is not spoiled by societal customs to eat, to spend time at the table, to celebrate, to indulge Yes, my granddaughter can skip breakfast or lunch or all together
    I work with young kids and have for years. Not with one child, many. At no point have I ever encountered a child who will simply decide to skip a meal out of a desired to not eat. I have encountered children who will, out of anger or upset or other strong emotions, refuse to lunch at the appointed time (say, if lunch is at 11 or 11:30) but every time this happens, they want lunch when they calm down; they never make it to the end of even the school day while continuing to turn down lunch. We never make them eat lunch and if they wanted to go the day without eating lunch, they could. The only kids who have ever made it the day without eating are the ones who do so for religious purposes*, not because their bodies have told them to.

    If you, who advocate for intermittent fasting, have a 5-year-old who is skipping meals, you should think about why that might be happening.

    edit: *And all of these children, although young, were older than 5.

    I used to "skip meals" all the time as a child. If I am not hungry, I won't eat.
    I also hated eating at school and simply wouldn't. So, I just had a breakfast and a dinner.

    My daughter (high school) has a crazy school schedule that changes daily and her lunch schedule changes along with that and some days her lunch is too early for her and so she just doesn't eat at school those days because she isn't hungry at that time.
    High school is different than 5-years-old. "They offer lunch too early" is different than "I don't get hungry the whole day."

    Are you telling me that at 5-years-old you went to school a full day and didn't eat the entire time because you weren't hungry? Because "I didn't eat because I didn't like eating at school" is, once again, a different motivator.

    As I said, I've never encountered a 5-year-old who just "didn't get hungry" for that kind of period.

    edit - And I want to be clear: I absolutely believe that there are things that can cause children of all ages to refuse food even if they are hungry. I think we've all heard the stories of kids not wanting to eat what was cooked at dinner, parents saying, "You can't leave the table until you eat it," and the kids falling asleep in the food. Kids absolutely can and do refuse food for a variety of reasons even for significant periods. But kids simply not getting hungry for the entire school day? I've never seen that. If a child is refusing food for that kind of period, I would want to know what was going on. Is (as is happening with your daughter) lunch too early? Is there a problem with the food? Is there a problem with the eating environment?

    If we look back to the dawn of the 20th century, obesity and overweight were the exception. Now in the 21st, it's the norm. Have we changed? Humans are adaptable creatures, but not that rapid. The environment has changes radically. Jobs are less physical. More cases of 2 parent working households or single parent homes. The food landscape has dramatically changed. Humans do have a built in satiety control system. Though many of the foods we eat today high Jack them. Unfortunately, we are monkeys living in a space environment.
    We've gotten incredibly dysfunctional with food. For example, RiderofWestern talked about his daughter's lunch being too early, and I absolutely see that in my schools; I worked at an elementary school where we gave them breakfast at 8:15am and lunch at 10:35am. It was ridiculous. If they didn't eat lunch at 10:35am, they were starving by the end of the day (3pm), but they only had slightly longer than 2 hours between breakfast and lunch. And they didn't get to CHOOSE when they ate, either; we mandated it. They also only got 30 minutes of lunch (including walking time, which sometimes got really long, because kids) which taught them to eat really fast and not listen to hunger cues about when they were full. Then there was the fact that we require them to sit still for incredibly long periods of time in class as opposed to being physically active. And although people will say the cafeteria food is nutritionally balanced, as required by law, that is...questionable. And that's just dealing with school, to say nothing of what goes on after.

    *typos, oops
    edited November 29
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