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Thin Privilege or Lifestyle Consequences

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  • jazzy550jazzy550 Posts: 264Member Member Posts: 264Member Member
    Nine states have an obesity rate of 35%! It's not an exaggeration.

    StateofObesity.org
  • jazzy550jazzy550 Posts: 264Member Member Posts: 264Member Member
    aokoye wrote: »
    jazzy550 wrote: »
    Nine states have an obesity rate of 35%! It's not an exaggeration.

    StateofObesity.org
    Though your choice of websites was a good one (the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is great), I am not sure how your post is relevant to the discussion. No one is denying that there are lots of obese people in the US.

    My post are relevant to what the guy on the video is talking about. I agree with him.
  • jazzy550jazzy550 Posts: 264Member Member Posts: 264Member Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    jazzy550 wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    jazzy550 wrote: »
    No! Look back in time. If there was "skinny privilege" then that means there's always been overweight people and that's not the case. Back in the early 80s and before everyone was thin.

    [edited by MFP Mods]

    Nope, I lived through the early 80s, although I was a kid. Lots of people were not thin, lots of people wanted to lose. Maybe we have a different understanding of what "thin" means, and certainly people overall were not as heavy as now, but no, not everyone was thin. My mom (who was high normal BMI or slightly overweight) checked out every diet book on the planet, and I was (a bit later) normal weight but not thin throughout my teens and completely depressed about my body.

    Anyway, back to the OP and responses, thanks aokoye, you may have saved me from watching.

    The percentage of overweight people in the early 80s and earlier was much lower than now. It's a fact!

    Of course, I said that too. That does not mean that everyone was thin. (Not being overweight is not the same thing as being thin IMO, and in any case there were also people who were overweight.) For example, here (https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/su6001a15.htm) it says that 15% of adults in 1976-1980 were obese (so the overweight percentage was higher) and 5% of children. One of the biggest differences and most worrying differences now is that so many people are becoming obese as children.
    People who overeat do it to themselves. I made myself fat by eating. I don't understand where it started, in our society, that being fat is ok. It has nothing to do with vanity and everything to do with health; fat people are not healthy! This app is all the proof I need to understand that that people know they aren't healthy. You never see an old person who is fat, because fat people die young!

    I don't think anyone here has said that being obese is not a health risk or that being normal weight is all about vanity. Are you arguing against some view you used to have or trying to motivate yourself or something?

    Personally, when losing weight I didn't find beating myself up to be very beneficial and I did much better when I stopped it.

    I am relating to the viedo that was posted.
    edited December 2019
  • aokoyeaokoye Posts: 3,497Member Member Posts: 3,497Member Member
    jazzy550 wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    jazzy550 wrote: »
    Nine states have an obesity rate of 35%! It's not an exaggeration.

    StateofObesity.org
    Though your choice of websites was a good one (the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is great), I am not sure how your post is relevant to the discussion. No one is denying that there are lots of obese people in the US.

    My post are relevant to what the guy on the video is talking about. I agree with him.

    Relevant how? The title of the page is, "State of Childhood Obesity" - the person who made the video said nothing about children (thankfully). The information in your link (which, again, is a good one) isn't communicated by way of aggressive or charged language, isn't focused on personal blame, is heavily oriented towards public policy, discusses ways in which public policy can encourage the lowering of rates of obesity, and makes claims based on actual data and research.

    Your link is only related to the video because both are talking about obesity. Otherwise they're pretty different.

    edit: if anything the link you provided is about people who would be negatively affected by thin privilege, have little to no control over their weight, and shouldn't be given advice by random people on the internet (as opposed to say, their pediatrician).
    edited December 2019
  • lynn_glenmontlynn_glenmont Posts: 7,559Member Member Posts: 7,559Member Member
    jazzy550 wrote: »
    Nine states have an obesity rate of 35%! It's not an exaggeration.

    StateofObesity.org

    That in no way supports either of your assertions (that everybody was thin in the 80s and that there are no old fat people).
  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Posts: 809Member Member Posts: 809Member Member
    sijomial wrote: »
    jazzy550 wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    jazzy550 wrote: »
    No! Look back in time. If there was "skinny privilege" then that means there's always been overweight people and that's not the case. Back in the early 80s and before everyone was thin.

    [edited by MFP Mods]

    Nope, I lived through the early 80s, although I was a kid. Lots of people were not thin, lots of people wanted to lose. Maybe we have a different understanding of what "thin" means, and certainly people overall were not as heavy as now, but no, not everyone was thin. My mom (who was high normal BMI or slightly overweight) checked out every diet book on the planet, and I was (a bit later) normal weight but not thin throughout my teens and completely depressed about my body.

    Anyway, back to the OP and responses, thanks aokoye, you may have saved me from watching.

    The percentage of overweight people in the early 80s and earlier was much lower than now. It's a fact! People who overeat do it to themselves. I made myself fat by eating. I don't understand where it started, in our society, that being fat is ok. It has nothing to do with vanity and everything to do with health; fat people are not healthy! This app is all the proof I need to understand that that people know they aren't healthy. You never see an old person who is fat, because fat people die young!

    But you didn't say less people, you actually said "Back in the early 80s and before everyone was thin. "
    And of course that statement simply isn't true.

    And yes you do sometimes see old and fat people. "Never" is also false.

    Hyperbole weakens your arguments rather than strengthens.

    I remember the old test taking trick our 3rd grade teacher told us. If a true/false question contains the words all, everyone, never or some other absolute is most likely false.

    Not sure what we are considering old. You do see obese people in their 60's but not so much in their 70's+. By that time they tend to die from the complications of obesity or they are so disabled they are in an assisted living arrangement and don't get out much.
  • jazzy550jazzy550 Posts: 264Member Member Posts: 264Member Member
    PS... The man in the video went over exactly what the title of this thread is, Skinny Privilege or Life Consequences. So I did stay on topic!
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