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Thin Privilege or Lifestyle Consequences

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  • MikePTYMikePTY Posts: 3,814Member, Premium Member Posts: 3,814Member, Premium Member
    Privilege is a societal issue. The problem is your body is not a society, it's a biological system and doesn't recognize privilege.

    So while we have the privilege of being able to discuss this, people are still dying (early) due to the food choices they are making.

    So the person who is overweight arguing thin privilege is doing themselves no good with respect to their health by pointing to such a social issue. It does nothing to change what they are eating. It does nothing to make their neighborhood or community a better place to live.

    Just as it was said there will always be someone who has it worse, there will also always be those who have it better.

    The question is, what are people doing with what they have in hand? Are they using the information they have to improve their situation, or just spending time and energy complaining that someone has privilege while not taking control of what is under their control and changing their trajectory?

    What makes you think that they aren't trying to take control of their weight? The two things are not mutually exclusive. We don't help people get healthy by making things inconvientent for them. We only make it more difficult because they have battle the difficulties of day to day life on top of fighting a weight loss battle.
  • tbright1965tbright1965 Posts: 841Member, Premium Member Posts: 841Member, Premium Member
    Actually, I don't think I said anything about if they are or are not doing anything. I specifically commented on the citation of those privileges. That is a fruitless exercise with respect to addressing one's own weight.

    I can comment on the idea of calling out privilege without it meaning I know anything about what they are or are not doing.

    To suggest otherwise is the logical fallacy of non-sequitur.

    I specifically ask the question, what are they doing, which means I don't know, nor do I assume that I do know.
    MikePTY wrote: »
    Privilege is a societal issue. The problem is your body is not a society, it's a biological system and doesn't recognize privilege.

    So while we have the privilege of being able to discuss this, people are still dying (early) due to the food choices they are making.

    So the person who is overweight arguing thin privilege is doing themselves no good with respect to their health by pointing to such a social issue. It does nothing to change what they are eating. It does nothing to make their neighborhood or community a better place to live.

    Just as it was said there will always be someone who has it worse, there will also always be those who have it better.

    The question is, what are people doing with what they have in hand? Are they using the information they have to improve their situation, or just spending time and energy complaining that someone has privilege while not taking control of what is under their control and changing their trajectory?

    What makes you think that they aren't trying to take control of their weight? The two things are not mutually exclusive. We don't help people get healthy by making things inconvientent for them. We only make it more difficult because they have battle the difficulties of day to day life on top of fighting a weight loss battle.

  • jazzy550jazzy550 Posts: 264Member Member Posts: 264Member Member

    "As for the rest of your post, I'm not sure what you're talking with regards to "If you don't agree with me then you're mean and you don't follow the community rules and I'm gonna report you thread.". No one has said that and frankly there haven't been any posts that even come close to warrenting being reported (I say this as someone who has no problem with reporting posts). I don't think this thread has been nearly the echo chamber that you are implying it is."

    Someone reported me. Not that it matters as I thought it was silly but yes someone reported me.
  • aokoyeaokoye Posts: 3,497Member Member Posts: 3,497Member Member
    Humans select for attractiveness. We can't help it; we subconsciously believe it is how we get the best, most successful mate with whom to procreate. As a result, attractive people always enjoy many privileges however what is attractive is not timeless.
    This logic doesn't work very well if we apply it to other forms of privilege. Ie those related to sex, national origin, race, disability, etc.

    That said, even if you only apply it to weight (and I'm willing to give you the doubt that you're not applying it to other forms of privilege), that doesn't make said privilege something that's ok or that societies can't work to change on an institutional level.
  • aokoyeaokoye Posts: 3,497Member Member Posts: 3,497Member Member
    aokoye wrote: »
    Humans select for attractiveness. We can't help it; we subconsciously believe it is how we get the best, most successful mate with whom to procreate. As a result, attractive people always enjoy many privileges however what is attractive is not timeless.
    This logic doesn't work very well if we apply it to other forms of privilege. Ie those related to sex, national origin, race, disability, etc.

    That said, even if you only apply it to weight (and I'm willing to give you the doubt that you're not applying it to other forms of privilege), that doesn't make said privilege something that's ok or that societies can't work to change on an institutional level.

    Sure it does. Attractive people of either gender are better treated than unattractive; an able bodied person is treated better than a disabled person; race and national origin are both related to appearance as well—the closer to “white” you are, the more privilege you enjoy. Of course these are sweeping generalizations but if you look closely at any prejudice or privilege related to prejudice, I feel it can be boiled down to appearance. We are merely mammals looking for mates no matter how much we want to think we are more.
    Except it's not about attractiveness in most cases, it's about power, superiority, as well as the tendency for people to group themselves and others.
  • born_of_fire74born_of_fire74 Posts: 774Member Member Posts: 774Member Member
    aokoye wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    Humans select for attractiveness. We can't help it; we subconsciously believe it is how we get the best, most successful mate with whom to procreate. As a result, attractive people always enjoy many privileges however what is attractive is not timeless.
    This logic doesn't work very well if we apply it to other forms of privilege. Ie those related to sex, national origin, race, disability, etc.

    That said, even if you only apply it to weight (and I'm willing to give you the doubt that you're not applying it to other forms of privilege), that doesn't make said privilege something that's ok or that societies can't work to change on an institutional level.

    Sure it does. Attractive people of either gender are better treated than unattractive; an able bodied person is treated better than a disabled person; race and national origin are both related to appearance as well—the closer to “white” you are, the more privilege you enjoy. Of course these are sweeping generalizations but if you look closely at any prejudice or privilege related to prejudice, I feel it can be boiled down to appearance. We are merely mammals looking for mates no matter how much we want to think we are more.
    Except it's not about attractiveness in most cases, it's about power, superiority, as well as the tendency for people to group themselves and others.

    Yes, and how do you suppose people decide whether they are superior or more powerful: what criteria are they using to group themselves together? Do they know your bank balance by looking at you? Do they know how much power you wield by looking at you? Do they know your ancestry to determine whether you are the same as them? These are not things people generally know about each other and, when they do, it is virtually never known at the time they make their first impression.

    When deciding how to categorize you and whether you are a member of their group or an “other”, people look at your clothes, your hair, your accoutrements and your stature; they look at your body language and evaluate your comfort level based on eye contact; they listen to the language you use and what accent you may have. Many characteristics that cannot possibly be determined accurately on the basis of appearance alone are nevertheless guessed at and used to rank and categorize you.

    psychod787: To many racists, a swarthy white lady is no different from a PoC lady at 50’ and possibly no different once engaged with, depending on the individuals. If you’ve never experienced negative consequences from this aspect of your appearance, that is fantastic! In many ways, we are expanding the definition of attractive already: TG models, plus sized models, the Dove campaign...
  • PWHFPWHF Posts: 213Member, Premium Member Posts: 213Member, Premium Member
    I think this topic got covered in a bit of depth recently in another thread, it's quite a polarizing one. The guy in the video seems a bit angry and he's probably cashing in on the controversy to get views - marketing innit...

    IMO the debate boils down to life choices being 'privilege' and if you buy into that or not. I get that some people are overweight not because of life choices but the majority of overweight people are that way because they choose to be that way.

    If they were complaining about something they could not control like 'tall' or 'pretty' or 'clever' privilege it might be more understandable. In the other thread someone raised a good question about the whole privilege thing - if someone has privilege what are they supposed to do about that? What's the expectation from the non-privileged?

    I'll stick to life choices are not 'privilege' but the guy in the video doesn't come off very well with his communication. Agree with the message but not the delivery.
    edited December 2019
  • jseams1234jseams1234 Posts: 1,139Member Member Posts: 1,139Member Member
    8b3950401ba1c4cd6ce51755f554c94b.png

    Interesting. I'm not over-fat by any means. I'm probably about 12-13% at the moment. Half of the data points in the graphic could apply to big and tall guys like me or bodybuilders in general... and I don't even want to talk about airplane seats. Luckily I almost always fly with my 5'2 wife and just encroach on her space. ;)
    edited December 2019
  • PWHFPWHF Posts: 213Member, Premium Member Posts: 213Member, Premium Member
    NovusDies wrote: »
    PWHF wrote: »
    I think this topic got covered in a bit of depth recently in another thread, it's quite a polarizing one. The guy in the video seems a bit angry and he's probably cashing in on the controversy to get views - marketing innit...

    IMO the debate boils down to life choices being 'privilege' and if you buy into that or not. I get that some people are overweight not because of life choices but the majority of overweight people are that way because they choose to be that way.

    If they were complaining about something they could not control like 'tall' or 'pretty' or 'clever' privilege it might be more understandable. In the other thread someone raised a good question about the whole privilege thing - if someone has privilege what are they supposed to do about that? What's the expectation from the non-privileged?

    I'll stick to life choices are not 'privilege' but the guy in the video doesn't come off very well with his communication. Agree with the message but not the delivery.

    Some people feel like it is not something they can control. I felt that way for a long time. Now that I am most of the way through my weight loss I realize that the secret was, among a few things, to actually stop trying so hard. That is not an easy lesson to learn when you have as much weight to lose as I did and people around you were assuming you were not trying hard enough. I believed it.

    I take responsibility for myself though. There are privileges to being less obese. The NSV thread is full of them. I have experienced many. That is not a society thing though it is a personal thing.

    I could not watch the entire video. The guy is a jackkitten. There may be truth to some of what he has to say but there was no point in saying it unless the video ended with him offering helpful advice. Being responsible for your choices is good but unhelpful if you are struggling with how to change them.

    I agree that it's unhelpful to tell people to just take responsibility and it's often a lot more complicated than that. I spent years battling addictions being told to just snap out of it or get over it would not have worked.

    I didn't watch all the video either, I got the jist early on and the tone of the message I don't think adds any value to anyone. I did see the bit where he mentioned he was previously obese and is obviously very proud of his transformation and the work that he put into it. I think this is what get's people's back up, when you've taken the tough path, worked really hard at it and stuck at it then someone who hasn't done that tells you you're 'privileged' to be enjoying the results of all that work it's going to provoke an angry reaction.

    It's all Internet drama and he's probably made that video for attention to sell his wares, and it seems to be working...
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